The Clean and Green Club, May 2016

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, May 2016
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This Month’s Tip: Words I Don’t Use
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Vocabulary is an important thing; it’s part of framing. I do believe that the words we use influence the outcomes we get. I want to share with you a few choice words and phrases that I either avoid altogether or use only to make a point—and yes, I recognize the irony that I’m dedicating my entire feature article to them—but only as a teaching exercise.

Sustainable/Sustainability: These words are everywhere in the green business world. But they talk about staying where we are. My vision takes us well beyond the status quo to a world that’s actively healing itself—reversing catastrophic climate change, turning hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war into peace.

Global Warming: Oh, it sounds so warm and comfortable and fuzzy and tender! While I don’t spend a lot of time jumping up and down about the need to change human patterns that influence climate—preferring to use the power of enlightened self interest to effect change, rather than guilt and shame—when I do, I refer to “catastrophic climate change.”

Killing It/Crushing It: I’m not interested in killing or crushing things, people, or organizations. I don’t see my success as require anyone else’s failure. I can thrive without hurting others, and you can too.

Niggardly: While I’ve looked at the origins of both words and they actually have nothing in common linguistically, I will never use that term other than to say why I don’t use it—because it sounds far too close to a nasty word to describe black people, and I don’t want to put out any kind of racist vibe.

Sucks (as a negative descriptor): This one came into use decades ago as an anti-gay-male slur, derived from a longer word that begins with “c.” ‘Nuff said.

Gendered pronouns to represent all people: I work toward gender-neutral language. Sometimes, because it’s easier than saying “he or she” or “his or her,” I’ll alternate. The first paragraph might use she and her, while the next switches to he, his, and him. Or I’ll write a paragraph in the plural, using words like “people,” “they,” and “their”—but grammatically, this requires that everything else is plural too. It’s not a construction I use often.

That’s Impossible: This is a special case, because actually I use this one in my speeches, writing, and media interviews—but I use it to prove its opposite. I talk about “impossible” as “the red flag in front of the bull,” defying me to prove it wrong. My most popular (and I think best) presentation is called “Impossible is a Dare” and it builds from this magnificent quote by Muhammad Ali:

“Impossible is just a big word thrown around by small men who find it easier to live in the world they’ve been given than to explore the power they have to change it. Impossible is not a fact. It’s an opinion. Impossible is not a declaration. It’s a dare. Impossible is potential. Impossible is temporary. Impossible is nothing.”

I use that same quote as a chapter title in my 10th book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, and as the theme for my most popular talk. I feel similarly about Can’t.

What are your banished words and phrases?

(With thanks to Marilyn Jenett and George Lakoff)

Order your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Find out more and order from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies directly from me). http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
Shel Interviews Thought Leaders
Michael Shuman, author of The Local Economy Solution, is the first person I’ve interviewed for a new series with thought leaders in enviro-friendly and/or transformational business. Michael talks about why most conventional economic development makes no sense and what to do instead. http://transformpreneur.com/2016/04/08/michael-schuman-why-most-economic-development-programs-are-a-disaster/
Hear and Meet Shel
GUEST ON THE ENRICHMENT HOUR WITH MIKE SCHWAGER, Thursday, May 19, 7 p.m. ET/4 p.m. PT http://wsradio.com/category/lifestyles/the-enrichment-hour-with-mike-schwager/ (and archived on that link afterward)

INTERVIEW WITH DR. WAYNE DORBAND OF ECOLONOMICS.COM via blab.im, Friday, May 20, 8:30 a.m. ET/5:30 a.m. PT (log on to blab and search for one of our names)

WEBINAR FOR INDEPENDENT PUBLISHERS OF NEW ENGLAND, “Green Audiences, Green Titles, Green Printing” Thursday, May 26, 6 p.m. ET/3 p.m. PT https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7842561726385736194
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About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of ten books…international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.

He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).

“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

Recent Interviews & Guest Articles:
Western Massachusetts Business Show with Ira Bryck, http://whmp.com/podcasts/western-mass-business-show-4-9-16/ Profiles of several companies that were founded to good in the world. Green companies as price leaders. How to get a copy of my $9.95 ebook, Painless Green: 111 Tips to Help the Environment, Lower Your Carbon Footprint, Cut Your Budget, and Improve Your Quality of Life—With No Negative Impact on Your Lifestyle at no cost.
 
Bill Newman: http://whmp.com/podcasts/the-101-best-dingers-in-baseball/ (segment starts at 28:28): A quick, intense 11-minute trip through the highlights of my work

Ask those Branding Guys: http://santafe.com/thevoice/podcasts/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world (segment starts at 9:23)
 
 
Todd Schinck, Intrepid Now, with a nice emphasis on the power of ordinary people to change the world: http://intrepidnow.com/authors/shel-horowitz-combining-principles-profits-grow-business-heal-world/ (segment starts at 2:28)

JV Crum, Conscious Millionaire, second interview: We cover my first activist moment at age 3, how I helped save a mountain, the next big environmental issue, and how a simple vow in my 20s changed my life http://consciousmillionaire.com/shelhorowitz2/ (segment starts at 3:25)

Jill Buck, Go Green Radio: http://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/92012/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world (segment starts at 0:52). The difference between socially responsible and socially transformative businesses, impact of a social agenda on employees, urban farming, new energy technologies…and a cool case study of how a dog groomer could green up.

Kristie Notto, Be Legendary: The perfect example of a business that addresses social issues, the hidden revenue model I showed a social entrepreneur, how a famous gourmet food company went head-to-head with a much larger competitor, what we can learn about engineering from nature, and why wars are solvable http://traffic.libsyn.com/belegendarypodcast/Be_Legendary_Podcast_-_Shel_Horowitz_for_itunes.mp3 

Guest on Leon Jay, Socialpreneurtv http://socialpreneur.tv/building-better-products/guerilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world (you’ll get to see what I look like when I’m overdue for a haircut/beard trim—a rare glimpse at Shaggy Shel)
 
Two-part interview on Steve Sapowksy’s excellent EcoWarrior Radio podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/pt.-1-guerrilla-marketing/id1080237490?i=363550688&mt=2/ (Listen to Part 1 before Part 2, of course)

The first of two excellent shows on Conscious Millionaire http://consciousmillionaire.com/shelhorowitz/
Another Recommended Book: The Responsible Company
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The Responsible Company: What We’ve Learned From Patagonia’s first 40 Years, by Yvon Chouinard and Vincent Stanley (Patagonia Books, 2012)

This thin book—the main text is only 92 pages—is not only crammed with a ton of great information (I took four dense pages of notes—more than I often do on books of 300 pages), but it’s also a joy to read. The book is extremely reader-friendly, with such touches as a warm and personal writing style, endnotes that reference the context so you don’t have to keep flipping back and forth, a list of further reading, and a super-comprehensive 12-page index.

Chouinard (Patagonia’s founder) and Stanley (its long-time marketing chief) start by pointing out the places where industrial society falls short:

  • Europe uses three times its share of the world’s resources, while the US consumes seven times its share (p. 19)
  • Rivers have been so dammed and polluted that many enter the seas through dead zones (pp. 19-20)
  • Every time we manufacture “crap,” we consume irreplaceable resources: human intelligence and natural capital (p. 27).

Reacting to humans’ negative impact on nature, Chouinard first manufactured high-quality mountaineering equipment. He started Patagonia as an alternative to sweating over hot metal forges for hours at a time; they saw clothing as both personally and environmentally more benign—until they started looking at the horrible environmental and social costs of chemiculture cotton. This started a journey to make Patagonia the greenest and most socially responsible company it could be, including

  • Switching all cotton to organic way back in 1996
  • Pioneering such employee perks as on-site daycare
  • Starting its famous take-back program for end-of-life products
  • Making sure that any job at the company was meaningful (defined as combining doing what we love and giving back to the world, p. 40)

And they extend this beyond the employee mix to all stakeholders—including the natural world (pp. 29, 32-34). Priding itself in its collaborative relationships with competitors, Patagonia has been instrumental in creating environmental standards for outdoor companies. It participates actively in two major industry trade associations: the Outdoor Industry Association and the Sustainable Apparel Coalition (p. 86). It also sees its customers as partners—and suggests that companies can accomplish a great deal when they romance their customers rather than B.S. them (p. 77).

One of the things I like best about this remarkable book is its overall attitude that doing the right thing not only promotes excellence, but expands our horizons. Without being preachy, the authors scatter aphorisms like

  • “To make a bad product is to do a bad business” (p. 35)
  • “Every time people in the company do something new that was formerly thought impossible, they contribute…to the sense that much will be possible in the future” (p. 40)
  • “The strongest thing your company can do is something no one else will do, or do well” (p. 78)
  • Collaborating industry-wide presents “a confluence of virtue and perceived opportunity” (p. 86).

There’s so much wisdom in this book! I expect to read it every few years. I recommend it heartily.

The Clean and Green Club, April 2016

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, April 2016
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Want to say thank you to me for all my hard work bringing you this newsletter since 1997? 

One way would be to order your copy of Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World by April 18 from Amazon–all sales before the pub date count in figuring out best-seller status, and I’m close to being a category best-seller. Would love to have your help in getting there. The book comes with cool bonuses, too: see http://impactwithprofit.com/giftsforreaders/ . Scroll down and you’ll see a green-tinted box (or plain text if you have HTML turned off) with the order link.

If you would like to do a very small and easy thing to help, consider donating a single automated Tweet and/or Facebook post, pre-written for you. It takes 30 seconds to sign up at https://www.thunderclap.it/projects/40108-business-solves-biggest-issues — just click one or more of those big red buttons.
This Month’s Tip: My Selfish Motivation for a Lifetime of Activism
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You know by now that I’m not only a marketer but a committed activist, working more than 40 years to create a better world. Now, here’s the part you might not know: I put those thousands of hours in, gave all those speeches, wrote all those books, started several movements and organizations—because I’m selfish.

But what differentiates me from, say, Donald Trump or the Koch Brothers (besides their obvious vast wealth and ultraconservative politics) is this:

—>I define making the world better as in my self-interest. I work to make the world better, so I (and my kids, their as-yet-unborn kids, my friends, and those who are suffering currently) can have a better world. That helps me and the people I care about.

It’s looked pretty much like this, going back to age 12 when I really got going with making the world better:


1969-75: peace in Vietnam. Because I didn’t want to go to war when I turned 18. I actually started mentally working on my Conscientious Objector essay when I was about 12. 

1970-present: environment, at least to a limited degree (I helped defeat my first nuclear plant in 1971, before I really knew very much). I thought clean air and clean water were not just nice-to-haves, but have-tos. How to bring them about if not by working for a cleaner environment?

1971-73: high school student rights/multiculturalism at my high school, and oddly enough, a side exploration in the Libertarian Party. Because my rights were at risk. I wanted freedom to dissent as a student, and freedom from draconian laws about things that were really no business of the government.

1973-85: LGB activism (we didn’t know more than a couple of Ts back then). The B part is about me.

1974-81: Safe energy/no nuclear power/no nuclear weapons. Because keeping the world from cataclysm is a part of those environmental have-tos.

1983-98: A lot of community board service on affordable housing, reinventing democracy, a free-form dance collective (the arts have always been part of my social change work), disability rights, and even a board advising the local District Attorney on civil rights issues from various minority perspectives. Worked with my city councilor to create the first nonsmokers’ rights regulations in our area. Also was involved in several mayor and city council races, including three where I ran as a council candidate, one where I managed a successful insurgent campaign (we won by seven votes), and a mayoral race where I wrote all the press releases. Because I wanted a better city and county to live in, and I saw the City Council as constituted in the early 1980s as a very repressive institution that did not represent the wave of new immigrants to town such as myself.

1999-2000: Founded and played key organizing/leadership roles in a group that saved a local mountain in just 13 months (I thought it would take 5 years). And it means that every time I drive by that site (just a mile from my house), I DON’T have to look at ugly houses going all the way up to the ridge line, or sit in traffic as they exit onto the main road.

2002-present: Reinventing the business world as an ethical, environmentally conscious partner in transformational social change
the last two years of it focused on turning hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war into peace, and catastrophic climate change into planetary balance. Because, thinking holistically, making business a partner in bettering the world betters conditions for the people and other critters that live here—and that includes me. And also because business has the resources, technology, and yes, motivation to do this work, where activists are often lacking some of those pieces.

So there you have my true confession: I make the world better, so I can live in a better world. And isn’t that as good a motivation as any?

What’s YOUR motivation to change the world?

Preorder your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Release date is April 19, just in time for Earth Day, and you can now preorder from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies from me). Learn all about this powerful book at http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
Shel Interviews Thought Leaders
Michael Shuman, author of The Local Economy Solution, is the first person I’ve interviewed for a new series with thought leaders in enviro-friendly and/or transformational business. Michael talks about why most conventional economic development makes no sense and what to do instead. http://transformpreneur.com/2016/04/08/michael-schuman-why-most-economic-development-programs-are-a-disaster/
Hear and Meet Shel
Connect with Shel


Find on Facebook


About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriteraward-winning author of ten booksinternational speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.

He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).

“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

NEW YORK BOOK LAUNCH EVENT for Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World: Green America’s Green Festival—New York, TOMORROW, Saturday, April 16, Javits Center. Mainstage talk at 11:30 a.m. followed by book signing. This is a great event; I’ve attended several times and this will be my third time speaking. Not just terrific speakers but also great organic food samples and cool products like the wallet and purse vendor who makes stuff out of old tires (I use one of those wallets that I bought there a couple of years ago).
GUEST ON THE BILL NEWMAN SHOW, WHMP 1400 AM & 96.9 FM, Northampton, MA and online, Monday, April 18, between 9-10 a.m. ET  http://whmp.com/podcasts/shows/bill-newman/

GUEST FOR ASK THOSE BRANDING GUYS, Monday, April 18, 1:15 p.m. ET/10:15 a.m. PT, http://www.santafe.com/thevoice/stream and live over KVSF (101.5 FM) Santa Fe, NM

INTERVIEW WITH TODD SCHNICK, http://intrepidnow.com, airs April 18 (and beyond)

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION DATE FOR Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World is Tuesday, April 19—and Earth Day is Friday, April 22

SECOND OF J.V. CRUM’S TWO INTERVIEWS ON CONSCIOUSMILLIONAIRE.COM, Tuesday, April 19 (almost no overlap between this and the earlier show listed at “recent interviews”) 


AN EXCERPT FROM Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, Brand Identity in a Global Economy, is scheduled to run Tuesday, April 19 at CarolRoth.com

WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS BOOK LAUNCH EVENT for Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, Wednesday, April 20, 7 p.m., Odyssey Bookshop, South Hadley. Come early if you want a seat; I’m expecting to fill the room.


HOW TO BUILD A MOVEMENT: INTERVIEW GUEST FOR KRISTIE NOTTO’S BE LEGENDARY PODCAST (f/k/a Kristie T), Wednesday, April 20, 3 p.m. ET/noon PT, http://awesomesaucemarketing.net/kristie-notto-chats-with-shel-horowitz/

SLOW LIVING SUMMIT, Brattleboro, VT, April 28-30 (theme: Food and Agriculture Entrepreneurship), http://www.slowlivingsummit.org/ My talk will be on the 30th @ 1:30 pm: “Impossible is a Dare: How Your Food Business Can Make a Difference on Hunger, Poverty, War, and Catastrophic Climate Change

GUEST ON THE BARRY MOLTZ SHOW, any time after Sunday, May 1, 6:30 a.m. ET http://barrymoltz.com/business-insanity-talk-radio-with-barry-moltz/

GUEST ON GO GREEN RADIO WITH JILL BUCK, Friday, May 6, noon ET/9 a.m. PT http://www.voiceamerica.com/show/1303/go-green-radio

GUEST ON THE ENRICHMENT HOUR WITH MIKE SCHWAGER, Thursday, May 19, 7 p.m. ET/4 p.m. PT http://wsradio.com/category/lifestyles/the-enrichment-hour-with-mike-schwager/ (and archived on that link afterward)

WEBINAR FOR INDEPENDENT PUBLISHERS OF NEW ENGLAND, “Green Audiences, Green Titles, Green Printing” Thursday, May 26, 6 p.m. ET/3 p.m. PT https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7842561726385736194



Recent Interviews & Guest Articles:

Guest on Leon Jay, Socialpreneurtv http://socialpreneur.tv/building-better-products/guerilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world (you’ll get to see what I look like when I’m overdue for a haircut/beard trim—a rare glimpse at Shaggy Shel)

Western Massachusetts Small Business Show with Ira Bryck http://whmp.com/podcasts/western-mass-business-show-4-9-16/

Friends Who Want to Help
Shift Network presents a telesummit, Earth Day Summit: Renewed Hope, Real Solutions and Reverence for Mother Earth, April 22 (Earth Day).

On April 22, esteemed green experts, spiritual leaders, innovators, activists, scientists and luminaries from around the globe are coming together to offer us all a renewed sense of hope, real solutions and reverence for Mother Earth. Join Starhawk, Kenny Ausubel, Vicki Robin, Chief Phil Lane, Jr., David Crow, Xiuhtezcatl Martinez and others for this no-charge online gathering — and find inspired actions for a healthy, sustainable and thriving planet. http://earthdaysummit.com/

Another Recommended Book: The Earth’s Best Story
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The Earth’s Best Story: A Bittersweet Tale of Twin Brothers Who Sparked an Organic Revolution by Ron and Arnie Koss (Chelsea Green, 2010)

This is a very well-written book—but not a pretty story. The twin brothers who founded Earth’s Best, the first company ever to produce organic baby food at commercial scale and with national distribution, planted a flag in the ground for 100% organic, top quality, and unwavering ethics.

Starting an organic baby food company turned out to be a whole lot harder than, say, manufacturing natural ice cream. Especially when you have no experience manufacturing anything at all (never mind the specific and very complex world of making baby food), you’re wildly undercapitalized, you discover that no existing manufacturing plant can keep the organic food separate so you have to build your own, your production equipment is beyond ornery, and you’ve chosen to locate in Vermont—3000 miles from the California base of most of the organic commercial growers that existed in the late 1980s US.

It gets even harder when you have to bring in venture capitalists with no understanding of the organic movement and no respect for the company culture, and you’re forced to give up control inch by inch over a period of years. These two very decent men got slapped in the face by the production issues and then knifed in the back repeatedly by the players they brought in to save the company.

Amazingly, Earth’s Best somehow survived, and was eventually sold to Heinz, and then to the natural foods conglomerate Hain Celestial. And it eventually became profitable, though long after the founders were forced out. And not so amazingly, the idea of natural baby food caught on, and all the major players eventually added natural and organic lines. For this, eco-conscious parents should give thanks to these brothers.

But the real reason to read this book is to learn from their mistakes. Use it as a negative playbook, so if you’re ever going for funding, you’ll know how NOT to get shafted. Too bad crowdfunding didn’t exist back then.

Of course, the book is told from their points of view. Those they battled with might tell a different story. And they made a number of errors, and then kept making them. Issues with sourcing and manufacturing had to be overcome, and sometimes that meant dumping unsatisfactory inventory for pennies on the dollar. These things happen. But their tolerance for incompetent, arrogant managers surprised me. And even worse, after getting burned multiple times, I’d have thought they would figure out that no oral promise is worth anything. Get. Everything. In. Writing.

I’ve read a lot of corporate histories, including several in the natural foods industry or other green sectors, and I don’t think I’ve ever read such a heartbreaking one. It’s an unfortunate reminder that too many people in power see business as worse than dog-eat-dog, and those of us who view high ethical standards and a compassionate approach as assets need to protect ourselves from others who are rapacious and uncaring.

The Clean and Green Club, March 2016

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, March 2016
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Do you have five minutes to help me better understand and serve your green/social change business needs? Please fill out this quick survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/9NHHMQ8
This Month’s Tip: What’s Really Involved in Launching a Book
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Bad news for authors who think the work is done when they turn in the manuscript. That’s when the real work just begins. There’s always so much to do for a book launch.

As you know, my 10th book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World comes out April 19. I could keep five of me busy, full-time, between now and the launch date.

Here’s a bit of a window on what I’ve been up to with it. I post this both as a guideline for how to launch a book and as inspiration that even though I’m doing most of this myself, I’ve been able to get quite a bit done—even while doing numerous non-book-launch projects as well (including ghostwriting a book and helping my daughter plan her wedding). This is only a partial list:

Last summer: 

  • Secured endorsements from 22 well-known people including Jack Canfield, Seth Godin, Ivan Misner (founder of BNI), Joel Makower (founder of GreenBiz.com), and the author of The New Rules of Green Marketing (among others). 
  • Obtained four guest essays from marketers Yanik Silver and Ken McArthur, as well as Cynthia Kersey (author of Unstoppable/Unstoppable Women) and Frances Moore Lappé (Diet for a Small Planet)
  • Began talking up the book and showing around the cover at live events and media interviews
  • Put up http://goingbeyondsustainability.com for the corporate market and http://impactwithprofit.com for entrepreneurs/startups
  • Secured cooperation from my charity partner Green America and support from Jeannie and Amy Levinson, wife and daughter of my late co-author Jay Conrad Levinson

December

  • Wrote and posted several press releases with different angles
  • Assembled and posted a full media kit: http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/media-center/
  • Prepared sample reviews in three different word lengths
  • Did the first of three bulk mailings to my list
  • Began to actively tout the book in my newsletter and on social media

Jan-Feb

  • FINALLY came up with the elusive brand I’d been trying to find for two years. I feel it accurately and interestingly describes the new work I’m doing showing business how to turn hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war into peace, and catastrophic climate change into planetary balance (this is what the new book is about)—and built a new website around this brand: http://transformpreneur.com
  • Booked in-person launch events in NYC (4/16, at a major green festival), Western Massachusetts (3/8 at a prestigious college, 4/20 at our best local bookstore), and Brattleboro, VT, 4/30 (at Slow Living, a very well-regarded environmental conference)
  • Booked about a dozen podcast and radio appearances and began to tape the first several
  • Went through 1500 media and 3300 personal contacts, selecting several hundred people to reach out to, personalizing my letters to them (not just with name but with a line or two specific to each). Some I invited to be launch partners, some to cover me in their media, and some to attend the local book launch (I still have room for people in all those categories, BTW)
  • Secured commitments to promote to their own lists and/or on social media from 85 people (as of March 1) with aggregate total list size of several hundred thousand
  • Wrote a bunch of tweets, newsletter solo mailings, newsletter blurbs, and social media posts, tweaking them for three different audiences: guest essayists, endorsers, and supporters
  • Hired a publicist, worked closely with him to shape a lengthy and unusual press release, and had him send out two blasts, to 5000 reporters each time—and answered each response individually
  • Renewed contact with a VA who had sold me ten hours of time a few years ago and told her I’m ready to use it on a social media campaign
  • Contacted a publisher where I had ad credits and arranged to use them
  • Submitted several articles to various publications and had most of them accepted

March (except for a trip abroad with probably very little Internet) and April will be equally busy.

Preorder your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Release date is April 19, just in time for Earth Day, and you can now preorder from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies from me). Learn all about this powerful book at http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
Hear and Meet Shel
Connect with Shel


Find on Facebook


About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriteraward-winning author of ten booksinternational speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.

He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).

“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

WARREN WHITLOCK HOSTS ME ON BLAB, Friday, March 25, noon ET/9 a.m. PT. This is an open conversation. You can turn your camera on and join in, or ask real-time questions in the chat, as long as you give your Twitter screenname. https://blab.im/y75eqa – this will be my very first time guesting on Blab.

GUEST ON THE BARRY MOLTZ SHOW, any time after Sunday, May 1, 6:30 a.m ET http://barrymoltz.com/business-insanity-talk-radio-with-barry-moltz/

GUEST FOR RONALD M. ALLEN’S MANAGING CHANGE SHOW, Monday, April 4, 10 a.m. ET/7 a.m. PT http://www.blogtalkradio.com/managechange/2016/04/04/shel-horowitz–going-green-raises-revenues-and-lowers-costs

GUEST FOR FRANKIE PICASSO ON THE GOOD RADIO NETWORK, Tuesday, April 5, 1 pm ET/10 a.m. PT. http://www.toginet.com/shows/MissionUnstoppable

GUEST FOR ADAM LERNER’S MARKETING PODCAST, Wednesday, April 13, 1 pm ET/10 a.m. PT (episode will be recorded and posted after production @ http://learnwithlerner.com)

NEW YORK BOOK LAUNCH EVENT for Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World: Green America’s Green Festival—New York, Saturday, April 16, Javits Center. Mainstage talk at 11:30 a.m. followed by book signing. This is a great event; I’ve attended several times and this will be my third time speaking. Not just terrific speakers but also great organic food samples and cool products like the wallet and purse vendor who makes stuff out of old tires (I use one of those wallets that I bought there a couple of years ago).

GUEST ON THE BILL NEWMAN SHOW, WHMP 1400 AM & 96.9 FM, Northampton, MA and online, Monday, April 18, between 9-10 a.m. ET  http://whmp.com/podcasts/shows/bill-newman/

Guest for Ask Those Branding Guys, Monday, April 18, 1 p.m. ET/10 a.m. PT, http://www.santafe.com/thevoice/stream and live over KVSF (101.5 FM) Santa Fe, NM

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION DATE FOR Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World is Tuesday, April 19—and Earth Day is Friday, April 22.

SECOND OF J.V. CRUM’S TWO INTERVIEWS ON CONSCIOUSMILLIONAIRE.COM, Tuesday, April 19 (almost no overlap between this and the earlier show listed at “recent interviews”)


An excerpt from Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, Brand Identity in a Global Economy, is scheduled to run Tuesday, April 19 at CarolRoth.com

Mid-April (air dates not set yet): Interviews with Todd Schnick, http://intrepidnow.com, and Leon Jay, SocialpreneurTV. I should have more complete information on these next month.

WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS BOOK LAUNCH EVENT for Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, Wednesday, April 20, 7 p.m., Odyssey Bookshop, South Hadley. Come early if you want a seat; I’m expecting to fill the room.


HOW TO BUILD A MOVEMENT: INTERVIEW GUEST FOR KRISTIE NOTTO’S BE LEGENDARY PODCAST (f/k/a Kristie T), Wednesday, April 20, 3 p.m. ET/noon PT, http://awesomesaucemarketing.net/kristie-notto-chats-with-shel-horowitz/

SLOW LIVING SUMMIT, Brattleboro, VT, April 28-30 (theme: Food and Agriculture Entrepreneurship), http://www.slowlivingsummit.org/ My talk will be on the 30th @ 1:30 pm: “Impossible is a Dare: How Your Food Business Can Make a Difference on Hunger, Poverty, War, and Catastrophic Climate Change

WEBINAR FOR INDEPENDENT PUBLISHERS OF NEW ENGLAND, “Green Audiences, Green Titles, Green Printing” Thursday, May 26, 6 pm ET/3 pm PT https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7842561726385736194


Recent Interviews & Guest Articles:

Two-part interview on Steve Sapowksy’s excellent EcoWarrior Radio podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/pt.-1-guerrilla-marketing/id1080237490?i=363550688&mt=2/ (Listen to Part 1 before Part 2, of course)

Book excerpt: Green Goods and Services Are Much Easier to Market: http://homebusinessmag.com/businesses/go-green/green-goods-services-much-easier-for-businesses-to-market/

Friends Who Want to Help

Are you an introvert? My friend Val Nelson is offering a small-group mastermind just for you: The Introvert SOULpreneurs Club: http://www.valnelson.com/services/introvert-group

Another Recommended Book: Business in Blue Jeans
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Business in Blue Jeans, by Susan Baroncini-Moe (Sound Wisdom, 2013)

With 34 years in business, I’m not really the market for another book on startup success. But many of my clients and readers are, and I often read books with that audience in mind (and wish I’d read a few in the very early days of my business).

This book is warm, approachable, and full of common sense, as well as a lot of Law Of Attraction and personal motivation material to get a new business up and running on solid footing. I found that many of the suggestions were clumped into certain sections of the book; I’d take a bunch of notes on successive pages and then go 10 or 15 pages without any notes. But even those less useful sections were still a good read.

The book contains several exercises. One I found especially useful is a new way of looking at brainstorming (p. 123). She also has a very small section on business helping the wider world, and I’m glad to see it there, even if it’s not very comprehensive. (My own next book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, goes into far more detail on this.)

Some of the wise nuggets I especially like:

  • Learn how to find the love often hidden in negative messages from friends and family
  • Understand that thinking Law Of Attraction thoughts isn’t enough; you also have to do the work 
  • Create a story that’s consistent with your reality AND with your customers’ experience of you
  • Seek out not only the intersection of your skills and interests and a market, but also for the intersections of both fiery passion and the warm gentle glow (much like a successful long-term marriage)
  • Develop great branding by first targeting your market as narrowly and carefully as possible (and recognize that if you’re in different markets, you probably need different branding and marketing even for the same product)
  • Use “lean in marketing”: be interested, not just interesting, and create a positive user experience
  • Recognize that search keywords, headlines, etc., should speak to the need (the hole your prospect wants to drill) rather than the tool you provide (the drill bit)
  • Acknowledge that more isn’t always better
  • Make sure all employees know that they are the customer service department
  • See mistakes as opportunities to fix things
  • Give value, even when you’re networking

The Clean and Green Club, February 2016

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, February, 2016
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Do you have five minutes to help me better understand and serve your green/social change business needs? Please fill out this quick survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/9NHHMQ8
This Month’s Tip: Three Words to Inspire My Year—Do You Have Some?
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Dean Cycon, CEO of Dean’s Beans, making music in Rwanda
Just as all the New Years resolution stuff is quieting down, six weeks into 2016, here I come with an article about it. What’s up with that?

  1. I already had Part Two of my two-part “Make Yourself Clear” series written and scheduled for January, and didn’t want to interrupt the flow.
  2. I thought it might be more effective if it didn’t get buried in a pile of inspirational New Year’s messages—just as I’ve advised clients to think about standing out in the pack by sending an annual greeting, not at Christmas but at some other time, like Thanksgiving, Valentine’s Day, or (best of all) the client’s birthday.
  3. This may be the most personal and vulnerable article I’ve ever written, particularly when I talk about the second word. I wanted to get your full attention.

Every year, bestselling author and social media visionary Chris Brogan challenges his huge reader base to come up with three words to provide focus for the coming year. This year, I decided to take the challenge. My three words are:

  1. Transform
  2. Win
  3. Love

Here’s what they mean to me, and why I picked them:

Transform

Transform is my top word because it’s so clearly the focus of my new work. A few days ago I even bought the domain, Transformpreneur.comsm, and I’ve already started putting content up (though it’s far from finished).

First, there’s the social transformation I want to bring about by transforming the business world. I want to end the biggest crises of our time, and I see the business community as the best lever. Appealing to enlightened self-interest—the profit motive—I want to make the bottom-line business case that just as going green saved costs and increased revenue, so too can turning hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war into peace, and catastrophic climate change into planetary balance

When I first started talking a great deal about going green and being ethical as profit boosters, around 2002, people looked at me funny. Now, it’s common business wisdom. I think the same will be true eventually for creating profitable products, services, and a company DNA that address these issues at their roots—especially since we already know how to do a lot of this.

Second, the transformation in my own business. I see consulting, speaking, and writing
on how business can bring about that transformation—including working with individual businesses or organizations to develop and market the right social change products and services for its own culture and markets—as a major part of my business in the coming year, and for the rest of my working life. 

While I’ve been thinking about these things for many years, have written books and given talks about it, I still have to find the markets that are willing to pay for what I know I can do for them. I go into the year with two quite different possible markets: small
entrepreneurial and startup companies, and large, established corporations/associations. I’ve developed two different websites for these audiences, because the agenda, methodology, timetable, and price structure will be very different.

All of this is a natural outgrowth of the green business profitability work I’ve done the past several years—but while it builds on the past work, it is different. I’m confident that I can make it work, but am still a bit fuzzy on the how. Which brings us to the second word:

Win

My original choice was “succeed,” but then I went to Chris’s post. He chose “win” as one of his words, and I think it’s like success, but stronger. It can also work as both a noun and a verb, as can my third word.

Also, I feel that on many levels other than the material, my life IS a success. I made a conscious decision about 30 years ago to have a happy life, and I’ve made good on that: I love the marriage I’m in, the house and community where I live, the places I visit, the local organic fresh food I eat, the books I read, the performances I watch, and so on. 

That decision rippled through all areas of my life. As early as 1985, it was the difference between feeling angry-frustrated-cheated when I had to spend an entire day of precious vacation mailing packages back to myself, as the old me would have felt—and thinking, even before I was married, about the wonderful story I’d have to tell my grandchildren.

But there are two areas where I need to replace that general feeling of success with a clear, strong victory: the economic underpinning of my business (which has now had two low-producing years in a row while I retooled for the transformation)
and the deeper impact of my work on the world.

The problem with having many interests and multiple skill areas is that it’s really hard to focus. When everything is fascinating, how do you choose? Yet, to succeed—to win—you have to close some doors so you can pass through the doors that remain open.

This is the lens: I’m using to help me choose what to focus on:

Over the past few years, I’ve worked hard to overcome a case of what my friend Noah St. John calls “success anorexia.” I’ve looked at my money/success blocks, and overcome a number of them. But, watching my own failures doing things that have worked really well for others, I realize there’s still some hidden piece, deep in my subconscious, that courts failure. I need to find that piece, hold it up to the light, make an alliance with the parts of it that act out of love (while redirecting them), excise the parts that are rooted in self-hatred, and have a clear win. This will be difficult, because I don’t even know what it is that’s holding me back. But it’s essential.

Once that hurdle is overcome, I want to look at how to broaden my impact. I have a great message and great examples of how we can solve these big problems. 

But for that to really change the world, I need to find hundreds of thousands, maybe millions of people who are open to that transformational message. None of my books have ever sold more than a few thousand copies. My blog and social media audiences total less than 30,000. The number of people who hear me speak in a year is much too small. 

Thus, the second big win I need is to get myself in front of a far larger number of people. (If you can help with the book launch, or if you’d like to earn commissions by bringing me speaking or consulting, please get in touch! 
http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/will-you-help-business-transform-the-world/) As an extra benefit, this will help with selling more books, doing more paid speaking to larger audiences, and getting more consulting gigs—in other words, contributing to the win I’m looking for in my own blocks. At age 59, I have a limited time to make a bigger impact on the world. I want to leave a legacy of creating deep transformational change, because I love this planet. And that’s a nice transition to the third word.

Love

Love of others and of self, love of the ecosystem and the planet. In my youth, I was a very angry, loud activist who felt utterly betrayed by governments and corporations and wasn’t good at finding common ground or seeking alliances with those who thought or felt differently from me. Over the years, I’ve learned how mistaken I was—starting all the way back in the 1970s. 

Some might say I’ve softened but I don’t see that way. I’ve learned to approach with love, respect, and an understanding that almost all of us want a better world; we just have different interpretations of what that means and how to bring it about.

Love is often about deep listening. It’s also about seeking a higher good for a greater number of people, without sacrificing the needs and desires of others. It’s about building the communication skills to allow environmentalists and Tea
Partiers to discover their common ground (something I talk about very specifically in my 10th book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World).

Going deeper, this is what allows even the most hate-filled opponents to go past the hurt and build a better world for everyone. Nelson Mandela was a master of this. So are the people who organize the various Arab-Israeli joint projects such as the magnificent Wahat al-Salam/Neve Shalom community in Israel, where Jews and Arabs study and work together—the name, in both languages, translates as “Oasis of Peace”—or Combatants for Peace, which pairs Arab and Israeli former combatants to travel around and speak about cooperation.

It’s easy to love those who agree with you. It’s much harder to love those you might blame for the death of a loved one or the loss of your land. I have tremendous admiration for those involved in these sorts of cooperative efforts and I want to be more like them.

(This is revised from a blog post written January 3, 2016.)

Preorder your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Release date is April 19, just in time for Earth Day, and you can now preorder from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies from me). Learn all about this powerful book at http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
Hear and Meet Shel
Connect with Shel
Watch Shel’s Ted Talk


Find on Facebook


About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriteraward-winning author of ten booksinternational speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.

He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).

“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

LIVE INFORMAL PRESENTATION TO TAMARA STENN’S CLASS ON SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP, Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA, Friday, March 8, noon. Contact me for details.

GUEST FOR RONALD M. ALLEN’S MANAGING CHANGE SHOW, Monday, April 4, 10 a.m. ET, 7 a.m. PT http://www.blogtalkradio.com/managechange/2016/04/04/shel-horowitz–going-green-raises-revenues-and-lowers-costs

GUEST FOR ADAM LERNER’S MARKETING PODCAST, Wednesday, April 13, 1 pm ET/10 a.m. PT

NEW YORK BOOK LAUNCH EVENT for Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World: Green America’s Green Festival—New York, Saturday, April 16, Javits Center. Mainstage talk at 1:30 followed by book signing at 3. This is a great event; I’ve attended several times and this will be my third time speaking. Not just terrific speakers but also great organic food samples and cool products like the wallet and purse vendor who makes stuff out of old tires (I use one of those wallets that I bought there a couple of years ago).

GUEST ON THE BILL NEWMAN SHOW, WHMP 1400 AM & 96.9 FM, Northampton, MA and online, Monday, April 18, between 9-10 a.m. ET  http://whmp.com/podcasts/shows/bill-newman/

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION DATE FOR Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World is Tuesday, April 19—and Earth Day is Friday, April 22.

SECOND OF J.V. CRUM’S TWO INTERVIEWS ON CONSCIOUSMILLIONAIRE.COM, April 19 (almost no overlap between this and the earlier show listed at “recent interviews”)

WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS BOOK LAUNCH EVENT for Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, Wednesday, April 20, 7 p.m., Odyssey Bookshop, South Hadley. Come early if you want a seat; I’m expecting to fill the room.

SLOW LIVING SUMMIT, Brattleboro, VT, April 28-30 (theme: Food and Agriculture Entrepreneurship), http://www.slowlivingsummit.org/ My talk will be on the 30th: “Impossible is a Dare: How Your Food Business Can Make a Difference on Hunger, Poverty, War, and Catastrophic Climate Change

WEBINAR FOR INDEPENDENT PUBLISHERS OF NEW ENGLAND, “Green Audiences, Green Titles, Green Printing” Thursday, May 26, 6 pm ET/3 pm PT https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7842561726385736194

Recent Interviews:
The first of two excellent shows on Conscious Millionaire http://consciousmillionaire.com/shelhorowitz/ (the other will air first on my official launch date, April 19)

Behind the Business with Author & Speaker Shel Horowitz http://www.fslocal.com/blog/behind-the-business-shel-horowitz/

Friends Who Want to Help

OSHANA HIMOT (the business coach who has catapulted me exactly where I want to be in creating a career around healing the world) is again offering no-charge consultations (and her phone number has changed. She writes:

“I am a business and life coach and work with people in many fields, assisting them to expand their work. it is unique for each person – the best programs to create, the groups to work with, how to find customers and clients…

I work with people who would like to help create a better society and can benefit from coaching. For a complimentary consultation, call 602-463-6797 or email oshanaben@yahoo.com. Oshana Himot, MBA, CHT”

Another Recommended Book: Strategies for the Green Economy
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Strategies for the Green Economy: Opportunities and Challenges in the New World of Business, by Joel Makower (McGraw-Hill, 2009)


Is it really worth reading a book this old on a fast-changing subject like green business success strategy? In this case, the answer is yes. Most of what has changed only strengthens Makower’s arguments. I identified two major areas where the world is quite different now—but far more where his points are still spot-on. Note: I asked Joel if he agreed with my analysis, and his response follows my review.

What Has Changed

Perhaps the biggest change is that he found some of the greenest companies reluctant to talk about their green accomplishments, with many of them worrying so much about being accused of greenwashing (or about being tarred with the brush of bad quality that plagued some early green products) that they were unwilling to claim credit (and gain the resultant marketing advantages). These days, almost every major company is trumpeting its green achievements in its marketing, and often on its packaging too.

The second-biggest shift is in the economics of energy. Even with plummeting fossil fuel prices, clean renewable energy is increasingly cost-competitive with fossil fuels. Some new wind and solar projects are coming in at 4 cents a kilowatt—unheard of when Makower was researching his book. At that time, enterprise-scale or urban-scale green energy was still largely considered unproven in the corporate world

What’s Still (or Even More) Valid (partial list that could be much longer)

  • A shift away from pollution control to avoiding pollution in the first place (pp. 9-12)
  • The increasing adoption of biomimicry—one of the most exciting design philosophies to come down the road in decades (I’ll be reviewing an entire book on biomimicry a few months from now)
  • Certification labels and definitions of green standards are still a jumbled confused mess, people think they know more about the environment than they do, and “green hopes far outweigh green habits” (p. 37)—all of which hold back progress
  • The idea that small behavioral (and consciousness) changes can reap big dividends (p. 63)
  • The perception that municipal solid waste (household garbage) is our biggest waste problem, even though industrial trash accounts for a far larger portion (p. 112)
  • Similarly, many of the largest energy wasters (counting a product’s entire lifecycle) are surprising or hidden: for example, chilling sodas, heating water for laundry (pp. 117-119); changing the shape of its noodle enabled Hamburger Helper to save 900,000 pounds of paperboard per year (p. 141)
  • We have to market differently to different market sectors (something I stress in my own writing and speaking); for instance, many green products are sold successfully to people who don’t particularly care about the environment but care a lot about health or product longevity/quality
  • Just the act of a major retailer requesting a self-audit from its suppliers can create change (p. 147)
  • Companies can often work together far more effectively than separately to green their operations—pooling everything from leather tanning for athletic shoes (p. 197) to information
  • Enormous progress continues to be made on some fronts, such as the astounding 75 percent drop in energy use per dollar of gross domestic product between 1950 and 2008—but with the growth of the economy during that period, carbon and pollution dropped almost imperceptibly (p 208)

Makower also has some timeless advice about the greater meaning of business: maintain your passion and activism, refuse to betray your values for economic gain. In other words, don’t lose your soul in the name of sales. He also has lots of cool tools to either demonstrate our progress or help make a case for better business practices, such as the CRED formula (pp. 180-188) and 10 reasons why green business is here to stay (pp. 236-239).

Even employees pretty far down the food chain can have enormous impact; it was apparel buyer Carol Rose who got then-Walmart CEO Lee Scott interested in selling enviro-friendly products when she bought and rapidly sold 190,000 organic cotton yoga outfits (p. 139). While activists will still find fault with its labor practices, supply policies, and store siting, the company has gone on to be a leader in many green business fronts, selling more organic food than Whole Foods and getting many of its suppliers to redo their product packaging along sustainable lines.

Joel Makower Responds:
“I will push back a little on your contention that companies are now talking vociferously (my word, not yours) about their green achievements. I can assure you that this is still very much an arena where the overwhelming majority of companies are walking way more than they’re talking. It’s a sore spot among nearly all the Chief Sustainability Officers I know at big companies. They can’t get their Comms departments to let them talk about what they’re doing. So, it really hasn’t changed all that much.”

The Clean and Green Club, January 2016

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, January, 2016
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Do you have five minutes to help me better understand and serve your green/social change business needs? Please fill out this quick survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/9NHHMQ8
This Month’s Tip Do You Make Yourself Clear, Part 2: 10 Tips to Make Your Writing Clear
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Welcome to another year! For me, I expect a very exciting 2016, with the new book coming out, a busy speaking calendar, and some consulting clients on building deep yet profitable social change into a business.

Last month, I promised you some tips on writing clearly. Note that most of these are guidelines rather than rules. Skilled writers can often violate them and still get their message across. Unskilled writers, not so much.

  1. Reread and edit before publishing (even on social media). Catch the dumb mistakes like spelling and punctuation.
  2. Aim for sentences of 20 words or less, most of the time. You can do an occasional longer one.
  3. Smash out the jargon. If you’re using a word that only specialists know, get rid of it or clearly define it—unless you’re only writing for those specialists.
  4. Make sure your sentences have clear subjects and verbs. If you’re discussing an action, you often need an object for the verb, too. Example of subject and verb with no object: “He pulled away.” Example of one with an object: “She pulled the cart.” 
  5. If your sentence is crowded with lots of subjects, objects, and verbs—break it up into more than one sentence.
  6. If you’re using pronouns (he, she, it, them, his, her, their, etc.), make sure that who or what you’re referring to is totally obvious. If the reference is ambiguous, you’ll have confused readers.
  7. Active verb forms (like “pulled”) are usually clearer than passive ones (like “pulling” or worse, “the pulling of”)
  8. Vary the structure, rhythm, and tempo of your sentences. If everything sounds the same, it’ll be boring and you’ll lose readers.
  9. Only break grammar rules if you know what you’re doing. There are sometimes good reasons, like avoiding the stuffy pompousness of “whom” or the sexism of using “his” to mean “his or her.” But most grammar violations come from ignorance; they lower your credibility with educated readers.
  10. Let somebody else look it over before you publish. Fresh eyes can catch all sorts of things.

Preorder your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Release date is April 19, just in time for Earth Day, and you can now preorder from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies from me). Learn all about this powerful book at http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
Hear and Meet Shel

NEW YORK BOOK LAUNCH EVENT for Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World: Green America’s Green Festival—New York, Saturday, April 16, Javits Center. Mainstage talk followed by book signing. This is a great event; I’ve attended several times and this will be my third time speaking. Not just terrific speakers but also great organic food samples and cool products like the wallet and purse vendor who makes stuff out of old tires (I use one of those wallets that I bought there a couple of years ago).

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION DATE FOR Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World is Tuesday, April 19—and Earth Day is Friday, April 22. Expect several more events to be added in April, possibly including a return engagement at Gulf Coast Green in Houston.
 
WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS BOOK LAUNCH EVENT for Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, Wednesday, April 20, 7 p.m., Odyssey Bookshop, South Hadley. Come early if you want a seat; I’m expecting to fill the room.
 
Additional events on the Mount Holyoke College campus mid-day on April 19 and 20, for Tamara Stenn’s class on Social Entrepreneurship. Contact me for details.
Connect with Shel
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About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of ten books…international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.

He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).

“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”

SLOW LIVING SUMMIT, Brattleboro, VT, April 28-30 (theme: Food and Agriculture Entrepreneurship), http://www.slowlivingsummit.org/ My talk will be on the 30th: “Impossible is a Dare: How Your Food Business Can Make a Difference on Hunger, Poverty, War, and Catastrophic Climate Change

BOOK EXPO AMERICA, Chicago, May 11-13. Hoping to set up an event either at the show or at a local bookseller.

Friends Who Want to Help

DONNA CUTTING’s new book, 501 Ways to Roll Out the Red Carpet for Your Customers, recently came out (and includes a little contribution from me). If you’re looking for ways to ‘wow!’ your customers, the book gives you 501 easy-to-implement ideas to inspire loyalty, get new customers, and make a lasting impression.

I recommend 501 Ways to anyone who wants to ‘roll out the red carpet’ for their customers, but feels strapped for time, money, and energy. Power-packed with proven, ready-to-implement action ideas to enhance your customers’ experience and make your life easier. http://redcarpetlearning.com/store/

OSHANA HIMOT (the business coach who has catapulted me exactly where I want to be in creating a career around healing the world) is again offering no-charge consultations (and her phone number has changed. She writes:

“I am a business and life coach and work with people in many fields, assisting them to expand their work. it is unique for each person – the best programs to create, the groups to work with, how to find customers and clients…

I work with people who would like to help create a better society and can benefit from coaching. For a complimentary consultation, call 602-463-6797 or email oshanaben@yahoo.com. Oshana Himot, MBA, CHT”

Another Recommended Book: Ideaspotting
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Ideaspotting: How to Find Your Next Great Idea by Sam Harrison

In my file drawer of future writing projects, one folder is labeled “How to Find Your Next 10,000 Ideas.” I may or may not get around to ever writing that book. In the meantime, plenty of idea-generator books exist.

For me, finding ideas has always been easy. My wife and I were walking in the woods one day, and I told her ideas were literally under every rock and tree. She challenged me to prove it, and I brainstormed over a dozen ideas from things I spotted in the next 100 yards or so. I can look at a page of classified ads and find 20 or more ideas. Even as a child, I doodled hundreds of exotic car and house designs and sketched water- and air-powered vehicle engines when I was 10 or 12. For me, the challenge is having so many ideas that I never get around to implementing most of them.

But I recognize that many people get stuck on the idea side. So, after rejecting the first three books I thought I’d review for this month, and needing a quick read so as not to get behind, I plucked this one off the shelf. While it’s 256 pages, many of those pages are filled with illustrations, charts, worksheets, text graphics, and assignments. So it is, indeed, a quick read. I breezed through it less than a week.

And while I found a lot of it obvious, if you’re not in the headspace of constant idea bombardment, this will open up your mind.

The book offers certain key principles: observe, explore, interact, play with the different senses and arts, drill down (keep asking why and how), collaborate, substitute, embrace serendipity…

These obvious steps offer surprising insights. Harrison mentions a CEO who prepared for his new position by working a menial job in the company for a week, observing and interacting. Why doesn‘t every new CEO do this?

What do I mean by substitute? (It’s my term, not Harrison’s.) Change one of the variables, as in these examples: Borrow from different industries; drive-up windows have spread far beyond banks and restaurants. Replace a material; my local university is building a major edifice not out of steel and concrete but from wood. Change a parameter; gardens and even farms can move from the ground to rooftops.

One of my own principles is to work backward from the goal, to reverse-engineer the steps you need to get there. This is how the iPod was created—the goal was never a better Walkman, but 1000 songs in your pocket.

This kind of creativity has major implications in our quest to create environmentally benign businesses that address the most crucial problems of our time. As Amory Lovins often points out, if you work backward from the goal of a net-zero-energy home, you can design it so well that you don’t need a furnace or an air conditioner—and the savings on those capital costs can pay for the improvements.

You can even work backward to achieve multiple goals; several companies make solar-powered LED lanterns to replace kerosene lanterns in much of the Global South. Financed with the monthly payment that had gone for kerosene, they eliminate kerosene’s toxic fumes, carbon emissions, and severe fire hazard, provide cost savings (once the unit is paid for) and greater economic opportunity because the light quality is better, and even at retail costs of $20 or less, make a profit. So one product creates health, safety, environmental, and economic benefits.

Some of my favorites among Harrison’s ideas:

  • Let your brain help you see differently. Two among several examples: Take mental point-and-shoot snapshots of your surroundings. But also seeing with soft eyes, letting objects gradually slip into your peripheral vision.
  • Ask who your customer’s customers are, and how you can benefit them.
  • Dissect a product to see how it works.
  • Create a custom card deck of insights.
  • Make—and learn from—“good mistakes”
  • Learn from nature; “collaborate with a hibiscus.”
  • Refuse to accept boredom. If you’re bored, change your environment or add a stimulus.
  • Get rid of the thinking that something can’t be done just because it hasn’t been. Harrison quotes Wayne Dyer: “The answer to ‘how’ is ‘yes.’”

The Clean and Green Club, December 2015

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, December 2015
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Do you have five minutes to help me better understand and serve your green/social change business needs? Please fill out this quick survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/9NHHMQ8

Now Through the End of the Year: Print Editions of Two of Shel’s Best Books (and an award-winning novel by his wife) for Just $4.95 per Copy


Perfect holiday gifts for the entrepreneurs, managers, marketers, and business students in your life—and for your own personal library. Also great to buy in bulk and donate to your favorite educational institutions and charities.
Nobody has to know that you only paid $4.95 each (plus shipping) for these award-winning and classy books from respected publishers. Grassroots Marketing: Getting Noticed in a Noisy World (Foreword Magazine Book of the Year Finalist)(Chelsea Green) retails for $22.95, and Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green (Independent Publisher Magazine Groundbreaking Indie Book)(John Wiley & Sons) retails for $21.95.

My wife, award-winning novelist D. Dina Friedman, decided to join the fun and make one of her novels available at the same price (and hers is a hardback!). Playing Dad’s Song, published by Farrar, Strauss, and Giroux, tells the story of a boy who faces crises ranging from a school bully to the death of his father in 9/11, and finds his way back to his center through music. It’s perfect for kids aged 9-15.

Because we’ve recently taken the rights to these books back, you can have print editions of these critically acclaimed books for less than a quarter of their original prices. Sometimes, there is more power in spreading a message widely, and low prices can make that happen. Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green, especially—with its message of business success through green and ethical business practices—has a role to play in changing the culture, and I want to see that change ignite.

The holidays are coming and everyone loves easy, frugal, useful gift ideas. (Note: if you’d like to be more generous, the gift of a strategic green/social change profitability consultation or copywriting project from me could be life-changing.)

Read more about these amazing books at
http://www.guerrillamarketinggoesgreen.com/ (Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green) CODE: 4.95guerrillabook
http://frugalmarketing.com/gmtoc.shtml (Grassroots Marketing). CODE: 4.95gmbook (it comes with a two-chapter update covering social media, no extra charge)
http://ddinafriedman.com/dinas-books/playing-dads-song/ (Playing Dad’s Song) CODE: 4.95pdsbook

Then visit http://shelhorowitz.com/shels-green-products-and-services/ to place your order. Make sure to use the proper coupon codes.

Note: Paperback only; ebook editions are available at the usual undiscounted price (still a great value). Quantities are limited to what we have in stock. If you’re interested in a bulk purchase, let’s talk. If you’d like your books signed and inscribed, please tell us what to say.

This Month’s Tip: Do You Make Yourself Clear, Part 1
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I was scouting my library for the next book to review and spotted a title by one of the world’s most prominent green economists. Great, I thought—until I started reading.

When I review a book in this newsletter, I read it all the way through. By the second paragraph, I was stumbling over so many obtuse sentences, I knew I wasn’t going to be able to tolerate 300 pages of this. The language was so ponderous, it felt almost like reading a foreign tongue. And I have a degree in communications, am trained in journalism, and I’m an avid reader, reading at least four and as many as 12 books each month of 2015.

Authors of nonfiction generally want to communicate and convince.

Yet, if this book is written too thickly for me, imagine trying to convince a tradesperson who reads two or three novels a year that the message of this book is worth all the work.

Here’s a 111-word excerpt from the paragraph that convinced me not to bother reading the book (it continues for another four lines):

The power of the concept of sustainable development is that it both reflects and evokes a latent shift in our vision of how the economic activities of human beings are related to the natural world—an ecosystem which is finite, non-growing, and materially closed. The demands of these activities on the containing ecosystem for regeneration of raw material “inputs” and absorption of waste “outputs” must, I will argue, be kept at ecologically sustainable levels as a condition of sustainable development. This shift is resisted by most economic and political institutions, which are founded on traditional quantitative growth and legitimately fear its replacement by something as subtle and challenging as qualitative development.

The problem isn’t just a matter of sentence length, but that’s a piece of it. Jamming three long sentences together with no break is certainly part of the problem. Long paragraphs compound the situation. I would have started a new paragraph with “This shift.”


But the biggest problem is the convoluted, meandering thought process. A good edit could easily fix this. To prove the point, I’ve rewritten his first sentence (dropping the word count from 44 words to 22):

Sustainable development’s true power is the way it anchors human economic activities to the natural world—a finite, stable, and closed ecosystem.


You can still get a complex message across with simple, understandable language; you don’t have to talk down to your reader. Consider these two paragraphs:

When you look deeply, a lot of the causes of hunger, poverty, war, violence, and catastrophic climate change turn out to be about resources: who uses how much, whether they’re taken sustainably, how fairly they’re distributed. When we address resources systemically, we’re able to transform hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war and violence into peace, and catastrophic climate change into planetary balance.

We actually know how to do this. Passive-energy construction expert David Bainbridge estimates that not only can we reduce the typical building’s energy footprint by 90 percent on new construction, but we can even cut the footprint on existing buildings by 50 to 70 percent. We knew how to build near-zero net-energy buildings at least as far back as 1983, when Amory Lovins built his house. We understand how to significantly increase crop yields without using chemicals and without compromising quality.

I like to think the above excerpt from my forthcoming book Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World takes some pretty complex concepts and makes them understandable—even with sentences of 36 and 38 words. 

Just to be fair, I’ll be the first to acknowledge that my writing could also use tightening. I think my original is easy to understand, but I could have written it even more clearly, starting by knocking seven words out of the first sentence:

Look deeply: hunger, poverty, war, violence, and catastrophic climate change often turn out to be about resources: who uses how much, whether they’re taken sustainably, how fairly they’re distributed.

Finally, one more example (from a different book) of what not to do:

The [name of tool] provides data profiles of four sample generic companies as starter sets with which to initialize the online simulator dashboard and worksheets.

One sentence, and I’m already lost!

Next month, we’ll look at some specific dos and don’ts to keep your writing clear.


Connect with Shel on Social Media
Follow on Twitter

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LinkedIn

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About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriteraward-winning author of ten booksinternational speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.

He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).

“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Hear and Meet Shel

NEW YORK BOOK LAUNCH EVENT for Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World: Green America’s Green Festival—New York, Saturday, April 16, Javits Center. Mainstage talk followed by book signing. This is a great event; I’ve attended several times and this will be my third time speaking. Not just terrific speakers but also great organic food samples and cool products like the wallet and purse vendor who makes stuff out of old tires (I use one of those wallets that I bought there a couple of years ago).


OFFICIAL PUBLICATION DATE FOR Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World is Tuesday, April 19—and Earth Day is Friday, April 22. Expect several more events to be added in April, possibly including a return engagement at Gulf Coast Green in Houston.

WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS BOOK LAUNCH EVENT for Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, Wednesday, April 20, 7 p.m., Odyssey Bookshop, South Hadley. Come early if you want a seat; I’m expecting to fill the room.

SLOW LIVING SUMMIT, Brattleboro, VT, April 28-30 (theme: Food and Agriculture Entrepreneurship), http://www.slowlivingsummit.org/ My talk will be on the 30th: “Impossible is a Dare: How Your Food Business Can Make a Difference on Hunger, Poverty, War, and Catastrophic Climate Change

BOOK EXPO AMERICA, Chicago, May 11-13. Hoping to set up an event either at the show or at a local bookseller.

Preorder your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Release date is April 19, just in time for Earth Day, and you can now preorder from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies from me). Learn all about this powerful book at http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
Friends Who Want to Help

DONNA CUTTING’s new book, 501 Ways to Roll Out the Red Carpet for Your Customers, comes out this week (and includes a little contribution from me). If you’re looking for ways to ‘wow!’ your customers, the book gives you 501 easy-to-implement ideas to inspire loyalty, get new customers, and make a lasting impression.

I recommend 501 Ways to anyone who wants to ‘roll out the red carpet’ for their customers, but feels strapped for time, money, and energy. Power-packed with proven, ready-to-implement action ideas to enhance your customers’ experience and make your life easier. http://redcarpetlearning.com/store/

OSHANA HIMOT (the business coach who has catapulted me exactly where I want to be in creating a career around healing the world) is again offering no-charge consultations (and her phone number has changed. She writes:

“I am a business and life coach and work with people in many fields, assisting them to expand their work. it is unique for each person – the best programs to create, the groups to work with, how to find customers and clients…

I work with people who would like to help create a better society and can benefit from coaching. For a complimentary consultation, call 602-463-6797 or email oshanaben@yahoo.com. Oshana Himot, MBA, CHT”

Another Recommended Book: Evolved Enterprise
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Evolved Enterprise: How to Re-think, Re-imagine & Re-invent Your Business to Deliver Meaningful Impact & Even Greater Profit by Yanik Silver (no publisher named, 2015)

When Yanik Silver sent an advance manuscript of his new book, I liked it so much that I adapted a whole chapter as an essay in my own new book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World. He’s one of four outside contributors.

My enthusiasm is apparently shared by a very influential group. Alongside my blurb, he’s got people like Tony Hsieh (founder of Zappos); John Paul DeJoria (co-founder of Paul Mitchell); and my brilliant friend Sam Horn (author of Tongue Fu and several other excellent books).

It’s focused very strongly on how business can have an impact in the wider world, and makes an excellent complement to Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World. But its focus is quite different; with the exception of the shared chapter, there’s almost no overlap. Although Yanik comes out of the world of big-money Internet marketing, his book has an almost spiritual feel—reinforced by the mandala-like concept wheel that opens several chapters. He even uses the term “Transcending” as the third of the three stages of an evolved enterprise; the others are Transactional and Transformational (pp. 48-56).

He draws many lessons in marketing AND management through his own experience and those of his Maverick and Underground members—as well as thought leaders from Thomas Edison to Richard Branson. Edison, he points out, created an entire ecosystem of his ventures, all of which supported each other (p. 93); in the modern world, Zingerman’s does the same thing, with a bakery supplying bread to the flagship deli, for example (pp. 86-88). Tony Hsieh notes the importance of building a culture—not just hiring for values, but firing over them (p. 185). On the same page, Yanik shares a powerful insight about leverage: “little hinges swing big doors.” And a long guest essay by Joe Mechlinski is just filled with powerful leadership insights (pp. 195-207).

It’s a lot about how the good feeling you have making a difference in the world—and the fun you can have while doing it—translates into measurable bottom-line profits. The fun piece is very important to Yanik, a self-described adventure junkie. There’s a long an honorable tradition around this; he notes that the Dalai Lama has referred to himself as a “professional laugher” (p. 104).

That fun often translates to really creative ideas around building a deep and lasting community, internally and externally. Whether it’s exotic branded swag (such as the green Speedos that have become a part of Yanik’s Maverick brand), a unique collective experience, or even the ability to earn some sort of merit badges, as Harley riders do (pp. 170-171)—these can have vast marketing impact.

Creative marketers, he says, have to fall in love with customers and prospects (p. 160), and to use that love to do the unexpected. I’ve said for years that your real brand is not your slogan, logo, colors, etc., but the prospect/customer’s perception of you. Yanik puts it a bit differently: “It’s what other people are saying about you” (p. 161). This could take the form of genuine caring, such as Zappos not just refunding the purchase when a customer’s husband died in an accident before she could give him the brand new pair of boots she’d bought him, but sending flowers for the funeral! (p. 143).

How do you find ways to inject that creativity and that love? Yanik offers not only the usual tools, but also “community decoders” such as origin stories, in-group lingo and rituals, creeds, barriers to participation, sharing the inside story, artifacts, exceptional experiences, AND a higher purpose (pp. 163-180).

He looks quite a bit about the choices we business owners can make in our consumer role. Example: choosing to hire a firm that employs disadvantaged workers to fill goodie bags for a conference (p. 50).

And much of the work is backed up with rock-solid numbers that validate our choices to use our businesses to do good in the world. I knew about Patagonia’s Don’t Buy This Jacket” campaign and mention it in my new book. But I didn’t know that the company’s sales leapfrogged 40 percent in the next two years (pp. 150-151). He has numbers for many of the best known case studies of social entrepreneurship and business creativity.

It would be nice if we could find these numbers easily. Unfortunately, Evolved Enterprise doesn’t have an index, although it has several blank pages at the back where one could have gone. It also could have used a better interior design and one more proofread. Despite these minor flaws, this book crams a lot of wisdom in, breaks it up with a lot of humor and visual concept examples, and could knock years off your social entrepreneurship learning curve. I recommend it strongly, and especially in tandem with my own Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World.

The Clean and Green Club, November 2015

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, November 2015
Like Twitter Pinterest GooglePlus LinkedIn Forward
Do you have five minutes to help me better understand and serve your green/social change business needs? Please fill out this quick survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/9NHHMQ8

Now Through the End of the Year: Print Editions of Two of Shel’s Best Books (and an award-winning novel by his wife) for Just $4.95 per Copy


Perfect holiday gifts for the entrepreneurs, managers, marketers, and business students in your life—and for your own personal library. Also great to buy in bulk and donate to your favorite educational institutions and charities.
Nobody has to know that you only paid $4.95 each (plus shipping) for these award-winning and classy books from respected publishers. Grassroots Marketing: Getting Noticed in a Noisy World (Foreword Magazine Book of the Year Finalist)(Chelsea Green) retails for $22.95, and Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green (Independent Publisher Magazine Groundbreaking Indie Book)(John Wiley & Sons) retails for $21.95.

My wife, award-winning novelist D. Dina Friedman, decided to join the fun and make one of her novels available at the same price (and hers is a hardback!). Playing Dad’s Song, published by Farrar, Strauss, and Giroux, tells the story of a boy who faces crises ranging from a school bully to the death of his father in 9/11, and finds his way back to his center through music. It’s perfect for kids aged 9-15.

Because we’ve recently taken the rights to these books back, you can have print editions of these critically acclaimed books for less than a quarter of their original prices. Sometimes, there is more power in spreading a message widely, and low prices can make that happen. Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green, especially—with its message of business success through green and ethical business practices—has a role to play in changing the culture, and I want to see that change ignite.

The holidays are coming and everyone loves easy, frugal, useful gift ideas. (Note: if you’d like to be more generous, the gift of a strategic green/social change profitability consultation or copywriting project from me could be life-changing.)

Read more about these amazing books at
http://www.guerrillamarketinggoesgreen.com/ (Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green) CODE: 4.95guerrillabook
http://frugalmarketing.com/gmtoc.shtml (Grassroots Marketing). CODE: 4.95gmbook (it comes with a two-chapter update covering social media, no extra charge)
http://ddinafriedman.com/dinas-books/playing-dads-song/ (Playing Dad’s Song) CODE: 4.95pdsbook

Then visit http://shelhorowitz.com/shels-green-products-and-services/ to place your order. Make sure to use the proper coupon codes.

Note: Paperback only; ebook editions are available at the usual undiscounted price (still a great value). Quantities are limited to what we have in stock. If you’re interested in a bulk purchase, let’s talk. If you’d like your books signed and inscribed, please tell us what to say.

This Month’s Tip: Two Books That Changed My Life—And How I Seized an Opportunity
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Yes, I do have a main article for you—but not here. The article is in two parts because I want you to think about the first part, draw your conclusions, and then examine the second part. I don’t know a good format to do that in an email newsletter, so I’ve put it on my blog. You will find it very worth the trip: http://greenandprofitable.com/two-books-that-changed-my-life-and-how-i-seized-an-opportunity/ (be sure to click to the second part after you’ve read this part).

Oh, and by the way, let me know if you like going to the blog. If the feedback is good, I might do it more often.


Connect with Shel on Social Media
Follow on Twitter

Facebook Profile

LinkedIn

Blog

Green & Ethical Marketing Facebook

Google+

About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriteraward-winning author of ten booksinternational speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.

He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).

“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”

Friends Who Want to Help


The Coming Business SHIFT That Could Change Everything

My friend Yanik Silver’s new book Evolved Enterprise impresses me a great deal. In fact, I blurbed an advance copy and got him to let me reprint one whole chapter in my own new book Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World.


I’m half-way through reading the final version, which I’ll review next month. Meanwhile, he sent this blurb:

It’s time for evolved entrepreneurs, visionary creators, and change makers to rewrite the rules of business for the 21st century.”

Imagine a whole new way for your venture to align purpose and profits, merging head and heart (and maybe even a bit of your inner child).

This is a counterintuitive blueprint to create a “baked-in” impact across your entire company by delivering an exceptional customer experience, creating a culture of fully engaged team alignment, and actually driving your bottom line!

Get Yanik Silver’s new book Evolved Enterprise here – www.EvolvedEnterprise.com

Hear and Meet Shel
I’ve been so busy getting the book done that I haven’t been booking talks lately. But that’s about to change! As the book launch draws closer, I expect to have several engagements. And remember—if you connect me with a paid speaking gig (OR a sponsor who will fund no-pay engagements), you can earn a very nice commission. Please write to me if you would like to help.

Preorder your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World


Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Release date is April 19, just in time for Earth Day, and you can now preorder from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies from me). Learn all about this powerful book at http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
Another Recommended Book: Be Audacious
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Be Audacious: Inspiring Your Legacy and Living a Life That Matters, by Michael W. Leach (Graphic Arts Books, 2015)

This may turn out to be a more personal review than my usual—because I’ve been pretty much living a lot of the principles Leach espouses, for decades, and because it’s been many years since I’ve reviewed an inspirational self-help book in this space. I think the last one, many years ago, was Jack Canfield and Janet Switzer’s amazing The Success Principles.

Yes, we arrived in the same place. However, our paths to this epiphany—our experiences and our perspectives—are very different. Leach is a former athlete who faced unimaginable physical problems, including a near-death illness. He had undiagnosed learning disabilities and was slow to discover the power of reading. He’s a Montana native raised in a rural area, and at publication time, he was 35. And he writes to a generation younger than his own; much of the book uses language that resonates with teens and 20-somethings. And he’s someone who—despite his decision to break away from them—seems to expect “haters” who will dump on him for taking the road less taken, and who call him irresponsible for bypassing the traditional 9-to-5. He seems to encounter them constantly.

By contrast, I’m a whole generation older, at 58. Though I’ve lived in the country for 17 years, and in a small college town for the previous 17, I was raised in apartment buildings in the Bronx (a crowded part of crowded New York City). I was an avid reader who got through a tough childhood with the help of books. And I never found a team sport I wanted to play. When forced to play baseball, I was picked last or almost last, and exiled to the outfield where my low abilities wouldn’t do much damage.

I gave up trying to conform to other people’s expectations in my thought patterns by the time I was 13. I do conform on some of the things that don’t really matter, like what I wear and how I keep my hair—but I think the biggest strength I bring is my ability to think differently, to see both the forest and the trees, to see opportunities for my clients that arise out of completely different situations or industries.

And I’ve found that the more I’m in integrity with my life and my message, the more people respect what I’ve done already, what I’m doing, and what I hope to do: use the profit power of business to turn hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war into peace, and catastrophic climate change into planetary balance. (Is that audacious enough for you, Michael Leach?)

Where we have common ground is in our dedication to preserving and improving the environment, growing out of our mutual love of nature. In our desire to think bigger and act bigger so we can have real impact on the world (a lesson it took me much longer to figure out than it did Michael). And in our adoption of the principles he lays out. To name a few:

Embrace Multiple Passions/Use the “Slash” Model
Michael’s book (his second) could be categorized as self-help/inspiration/memoir. He uses his own experience as a teaching tool throughout the book, as well as case studies from the kids he’s coached, the people he’s encountered on his speaking tours, or those he guided through the wilderness.

Michael doesn’t fit neatly into little boxes. He uses lots of slashes to join together his different parts into a “renaissance soul” (a term coined by my late friend Margaret Lobenstine to describe a Ben Franklin/Da Vinci/Oprah/Buckminster Fuller/Thomas Jefferson type who explores numerous interests and passions. He describes his own set of slashes (ranger/naturalist, fishing and wildlife guide, freelance writer, basketball coach, and founder of a nonprofit) several different ways in the book, and even breaks down the nonprofit role into “executive director/programming coordinator/chief fund-raising coordinator” (p. 178).

My set might look like this: speaker/writer/consultant/practical visionary/social change activist/community organizer/marketer. Or I could apply a completely different set of labels (parent/vegetarian foodie/traveler/student of cultures—to name a small slice of the possibilities) that would be just as accurate. But for me, it all boils down to the core mission: I help people understand that doing the right thing is an opportunity, not a sacrifice—and I model the possibility of environmentally and socially conscious life and work.

For both of us, all of these slices of ourselves are based in passion—in “permapassion,” to use a term called by Leach’s friend Scottie B. Black. I love this word’s linguistic combination of permaculture and passion. And those passions have to go beyond pure hedonism. Yes, take joy in what you do. And at the same time, keep sight of your higher purpose; channel your energies toward the passions that can change the world.

“If Your Self-Talk Isn’t Helpful, Change It” (p. 103)
While it certainly isn’t the whole story, the idea popularized in the book/movie, The Secret, that our thoughts control our destinies has some truth. If you hit yourself over the head with all the reasons you can’t do a thing, you’re not likely to get it done. But if you focus on the reasons you can accomplish what you want to, those paths have a way of opening. And if you dream those big, audacious dreams, you have a responsibility not to sabotage yourself.

Work like an Onion (p. 177), and work yourself out from the your soul to the wider community.
I might flip this one inside-out. Yes, work from the inside out, but also from the outside in. Keep going deeper and deeper until you find the inner truth.

See Happiness not as Entitlement but as Opportunity (pp. 241-242)
You can start creating happiness in others—and in yourself—by doing little good deeds, as simple as smiling or holding a door open. As you learn to think and act bigger, more exciting changes will arise.

Leach focuses a lot on adversity creating resilience. And he’s experienced a lot of adversity. That’s one path; I’ve found plenty of other ways to build resilience. Again, there are many paths.

I could say much more about this book, but this already is longer than most of my reviews. Go get it and decide for yourself.

The Clean and Green Club, October 2015

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, October 2015
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Now Through the End of the Year: Two of Shel’s Best Books (and an award-winning novel by his wife) for Just $4.95 per Copy 


Perfect holiday gifts for the entrepreneurs, managers, marketers, and business students in your life—and for your own personal library. Also great to buy in bulk and donate to your favorite educational institutions and charities.

Nobody has to know that you only paid $4.95 each (plus shipping) for these useful and classy books from respected publishers. Grassroots Marketing: Getting Noticed in a Noisy World (a Foreword Magazine Book of the Year Finalist, published by Chelsea Green, known for its wide list of books on green business and green living) retails for $22.95, and Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green (only the fifth book to be named a Groundbreaking Indie Book by Independent Publisher Magazine, published by John Wiley & Sons—one of the top business book publishers in the world, in business for more than 200 years—and republished in Turkey and Italy) retails for $21.95.

My wife, award-winning novelist D. Dina Friedman, decided to join the fun and make one of her novels available at the same price (and hers is a hardback!). Playing Dad’s Song, published by Farrar, Strauss, and Giroux, tells the story of a boy who faces crises ranging from a school bully to the death of his father in 9/11, and finds his way back to his center through music. It’s perfect for kids aged 9-15.

Why am I selling these critically acclaimed books for less than a quarter of their original prices? Several reasons:

  1. I’ve always been about giving you the maximum value I can. These books will build your skills and those lucky enough to get them as gifts.
  2. Sometimes, there is more power in spreading a message widely, and low prices can make that happen. Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green, especially—with its message of business success through green and ethical business practices—has a role to play in changing the culture, and I want to see that change ignite.
  3. We’ve recently taken the rights to these books back and their original publishers have withdrawn them from publication. That means that not only am I the only source of new copies, but also that I am no longer beholden to those publishers in what I can charge. Thus, I can pass savings on to you.
  4. My forthcoming 10th book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, takes the main concepts in Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green and expands and updates them, so I no longer feel comfortable asking full price for that title. And Grassroots Marketing is an older book that doesn’t cover social media (though with every purchase through my own website, I give away a two-chapter update that does).
  5. The holidays are coming and everyone loves easy, frugal, useful gift ideas. (Note: if you’d like to be more generous, the gift of a strategic green/social change profitability consultation or copywriting project from me could be life-changing for the recipient.)
  6. Quite frankly, we’re thinking about a major cleanout now that the kids are grown and out of the house, and that means we need to create more room in the attic.

Read more about these amazing books at
http://www.guerrillamarketinggoesgreen.com/ (Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green) CODE: 4.95guerrillabook
http://frugalmarketing.com/gmtoc.shtml (Grassroots Marketing). CODE: 4.95gmbook
http://ddinafriedman.com/dinas-books/playing-dads-song/ (Playing Dad’s Song) CODE: 4.95pdsbook

Then visit http://shelhorowitz.com/shels-green-products-and-services/ to place your order. Make sure to use the proper coupon codes.

Note: quantities are limited to what we have in stock. If you’re interested in a bulk purchase, let’s talk.

This Month’s Tip: Check Your Calendar
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Would you ever schedule a marketing seminar or a meeting for Christmas Day? Easter Sunday? Of course not. Yet, too often, we set our calendars without paying attention to other people’s priorities. If your audience is mainstream and primarily male, don’t schedule it on Super Bowl Sunday or during the World Series. If you want to do a lunch meeting in a Muslim community, it won’t be well attended during Ramadan.

Writing this on September 24, one of the top-of-mind issues for me is how many events took place yesterday, every one of them organized by people who should know better. I think I was personally invited to attend about 12 events—all of which I declined.

What was so special about September 23, 2015 that I don’t think people should have even scheduled events? Hint: it’s an event that actually started the evening before.

The evening of September 22 into the evening of September 23 was Yom Kippur in the year 5776, which began with Rosh Hashana, another very important Jewish holiday that started the evening of September 13 and continued through sundown on the 15th. Yom Kippur is actually the holiest day of the Jewish year. It’s the day when every Jew is expected to get things right with God, with ourselves, and with other humans—a day spent in fasting, prayer, and solemnity. People fully observing the holiday will not even be booting their computers or phones that day. Orthodox Jews would not even set foot in a car or public transportation, though Reform, Conservative, and Reconstructionist Jews will drive to synagogue.

And yetsuch a small percentage of people planning meetings and events even bother to check a Jewish calendar, which takes about eight nanoseconds on Google, before scheduling events on these extremely sacred days. Considering that Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur always occur between the very end of August and the first third of October, it isn’t very hard to figure this out ahead of time. If you’re planning an event during that time, you should check. No, it should not be up to your Jewish friends and customers to inform you after the fact. You should preemptively find out when those dates are, and schedule around them. And you certainly should not wave a finger in the faces of the Jews in your circle and get annoyed when your secular priority is pushed aside for a meeting with God.


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About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriteraward-winning author of ten booksinternational speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.

He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).

“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Being part of the business world in the 21st century requires cultural sensitivity. Most of us don’t live in monocultures any more. Obviously, you can’t check your dates against every possible holiday in every possible culture, but you can pump your proposed date (and the following day, since many cultures start events the night before) into Google with the word “holiday.” As you can see on the screen shot, even just searching for “september 23 2015 holiday” instantly matched with Yom Kippur. Googling “super bowl 2016” tells me I will not be scheduling any events for February 7. Do these simple searches before you commit resources for a conference space or other venue.

Friends Who Want to Help

30-minute no-charge session with a master business and life coach
Posting this on behalf of my friend, colleague, and masterful coach Oshana Himot. I have benefitted enormously working with her. She’s really helped me crystalize the idea that I can shift my focus to turn hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war into peace, and catastrophic climate change into planetary balance—through the profit motive. Without her, I wouldn’t have done my TEDx talk, “Impossible is a Dare” (hear the talk and see the slides at http://www.business-for-a-better-world.com/tedtalks/ )
nor would I have written the new book.

She writes: “If you create change for society in positive waysI’m a skilled coach who can help you get through the stuck places and go forward… With a mix of both business and life coaching skills, and MBA, and a diversified set of tools, I help you find the unique and wonderful person you are–and the amazing, powerful person you’d like to become. What you would like to achieve.

“How can this can benefit you? Schedule a complimentary 30-minute session and find out. You can reach me at602-463-6797 or through email at: oshana@oshanasjoywork.com.“

Debbie Allen’s new book on Positioning—Yours at NO Cost
I’ve got an exciting gift for you! Download Debbie Allen’s brand new book, EXPERT POSITIONING: How to Dominate Your Competition and Gain High Paying Clients at no cost. Expert Positioning is a great way to stand out and market your business; I’ve personally built my business with it. Debbie’s been in the expert space for decades. Her new book walks you through the process to setting up your expert business so you can easily gain higher paying clients and make more sales. Get your free copy now at www.ExpertDomination.com 

Hear and Meet Shel
I’ve been so busy getting the book done that I haven’t been booking talks lately. But that’s about to change! As the book launch draws closer, I expect to have several engagements. And remember—if you connect me with a paid speaking gig (OR a sponsor who will fund no-pay engagements), you can earn a very nice commission. Please write to me if you would like to help.


Check out the stellar looking Guerrilla Marketing Reunion with a lineup that includes Seth Godin, Jay Conrad Levinson’s widow Jeannie Levinson, Joel Comm, Loral Langemeier, and several other luminaries, November 2-4 in Orlando. Price is very reasonable. I’m going; how about you? http://guerrillamarketingfamilyreunion.com/ (Oh, and let me know if you’re a nonsmoker who’d like to share a hotel room.)
Another Recommended Book: A New Psychology for Sustainability Leadership
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A New Psychology for Sustainability Leadership: The Hidden Power of Ecological Worldviews, by Steve Schein, Ph.D. (Greenleaf Publishing, 2015)

Much has been written about the mainstreaming of sustainability efforts in the corporate world. But very little has been written about the mindset and worldview of the people making that change.

Thus, this repurposed doctoral dissertation steps into the breech. It opens a much-needed conversation about the shifts we need to take—not just our own small groups but the entire business culture—so that sustainability thinking percolates even more deeply into the culture. Schein spends a lot of energy calling for a more eco-focused worldview, including integrating sustainability thinking into the standard MBA curriculum—not just the MBA programs in sustainability.

To Schein—and I agree with him on this, if you remember last month’s book review of Alex Epstein’s book—the biggest shift we need to take is from an anthrocentric (human-focused) to an eco-centered (planet-focused).

How far do we have to go? Schein, in a book with this year’s copyright, says the average resident of the United States eats 400 pounds of petroleum per year, once we factor in all of the Big Ag practices that make up most of our food supply (“machinery, fertilizers, pesticides, processing, and transportation”, p. 6). On the same page, he cites Lester Brown’s warning that food and water shortages can lead directly to political instability.

Most of the book is quotes from interviews he conducted with executives in the corporate and NGO worlds charged with developing and carrying out the corporate sustainability program, and his narrative interpreting and analyzing the results.

He sees the job of Chief Sustainability Officers, or eco-minded CEOs as translating sustainability into the rest of the business world (p. 146). Noting that we desperately need business models aimed not at corporate growth but on profitably reducing the negative consequences of human intervention (p. 76), Schein calls out five different ways (pp. 72-84) his interviewees have self-identified their worldviews:

  1. Awareness of ecological embeddedness—that a business vision must encompass the environmental context
  2. Awareness that planetary ecosystems are vulnerable
  3. Belief that nature has intrinsic value
  4. Holistic, systemic consciousness
  5. Earth-centrism

This level of thinking, he says, evolves over time—and he speculates that one reason so much sustainability thinking is bubbling up right now is simply that people are living longer and have more time for their thinking to evolve. On this, I’m not so sure I agree; I see this consciousness fairly evolved among my children’s generation, but what does evolve is the ability to work in complex, sometimes-frustrating, often-hierarchical organizations to make the change.

Schein’s book should be seen as opening the conversation, rather than a definitive Great Work. His action steps are rather limited, and the book has a few key flaws: small sample size (only 75 corporate and NGO sustainability professionals), an inexcusable failure to identify the sources of each quote—which, in turn, makes it impossible not just to track who said what in terms of the specific challenges and accomplishments of that person’s company—a flaw he acknowledges on page 186—but also impossible to follow up with any interviewee beyond the book (seeking a mentor, interviewing for a book, etc.), the lack of an index, and repetition of several interviewee quotes in such a short text.

One nice thing is the inclusion of a questionnaire that future researchers can use in expanding the dialog. Another is his reminder of Buckminster Fuller’s observation that any of us can be a “human trim tab” (the part of a large ship that makes it easier to turn the rudder, p. 167); any one of us can be an agent of real change.

The Clean and Green Club, September, 2015

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, September 2015
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Can a Book Launch Change the World?
Only if…
1. The book contains powerful new ways of looking at the world, powerful solutions to make and spread change
2. Enough people read the book and start discussing those ideas

Books have often changed the world. Think about The Tipping Point, In Search of Excellence, or even way back to Silent Spring, Tom Paine’s Common Sense and Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin. I could list hundreds more examples.

My forthcoming 10th book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, can change the business world—with your help. It scores well on #1, showing how businesses can not just go green, but actually make a difference AND a profit turning hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war into peace, and catastrophic climate change into planetary balance.

I’d love your help with #2! And there are several incentives to participate. Please visit http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/will-you-help-business-transform-the-world/ for all the details.

A bit more about the book: Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, my second collaboration with the legendary Jay Conrad Levinson (Father of Guerrilla Marketing), comes out in March, with endorsements by Jack Canfield of Chicken Soup, Seth Godin, the founders of BNI and GreenBiz.com, the author of The New Rules of Green Marketing (among others), and essays from the authors of Unstoppable/Unstoppable Women and Diet for a Small Planet as well as marketing superstars Yanik Silver and Ken McArthur.

This Month’s Tip: Types of Partnerships
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Every entrepreneur wants new sources of revenue with almost no risk, yet only a small portion understand how the magic of a good partnership can bring this about. As an example, many partnerships are built around payment for results; rather than paying thousands of dollars to advertise in the media with no guarantee of results, you only pay your partners commissions for the sales they actually achieve for you.

Open your mind to infinite possibilities! Last month we talked about who makes a good partner. Now, let’s look at the myriad ways to structure a partnership.

Partnerships can be extremely simple, or very complex. Either way, they typically fall into three main categories, with thousands of subgroupings. So obviously, this is not a comprehensive list ;-):

Marketing, Branding, and Fundraising

  • Referral, with no commission (see the example from my own early days in last month’s newsletter)
  • Referral, with commission
  • Affiliate (where software tracks commissions for you)
  • Package stuffers: you include an offer from another business when you mail out your orders or bag them at a retail counter (with or without a tracking code)
  • Co-marketing multiple products and services from multiple vendors, as individual offerings
  • Co-marketing multiple products and services from multiple vendors, as a single value-added and/or discounted package (as the separate companies with a word processor, spreadsheet, and database did years ago when they created a suite to compete with Microsoft Office)
  • Partnering with a charity/NGO to donate a percentage of sales, time-limited (“dine with us Tuesday and we’ll donate 10% to the food pantry”) or otherwise conditional (“every 50th caller raises another $100 for United Way”)
  • Partnering with a charity/NGO to donate a percentage of sales, ongoing (“portion of the proceeds will be donated to Rainforest Action”)
  • Producing the same product under multiple brand labels (supermarket private-label brands, car companies)
  • Organizing events with a charity partner and bringing in media partners (radio and TV stations, newspapers, popular Internet sites) to publicize the event at no charge
  • Joining forces to create and promote theme-based events, geographical groupings, or other promotions that benefit all participants (maps showing groups of artisanal food businesses or antique shops, themed festivals for craft beer or renewable energy, Taste of the City/Neighborhood restaurant fairs
  • Similar efforts for geography-based communities, neighborhoods, or even individual streets without an overriding theme, such as this example of a street in St. Augustine, Florida: https://www.facebook.com/AvilesStreet

Operations and R&D

  • Joining forces to address different parts of a complex project (the massive energy efficiency retrofit of the Empire State Building involved companies with expertise in window remanufacturing, temperature controls, insulation, and overall green building design)
  • Co-creating new products and technologies (the PowerPC computer chip that ran many computers in the 1990s was a joint project of Apple, IBM, and Motorola)
  • Engaging corporate and NGO leaders in a joint visioning/revisioning process to develop much greener, more socially conscious approaches in business (this month’s recommended book has dozens of examples; I also consult on this)
  • Presenting a unified front to address big problems (as European car manufacturers did when they agreed on strategies and processes to take back used up vehicles at the end of their useful life and reuse the parts, pointing out to the government that having their cooperation would work better than an adversarial relationship)
  • Mergers and acquisitions

Financial

  • Cooperative ownership
  • Pay-upfront memberships such as CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) farms
  • Stock options/employee ownership plans
  • Traditional financial partnerships, such as silent partners, angels/VCs, and IPOs—and the more consumer-oriented models such as mutual funds that create partnerships with thousands of members
  • Issuing scrip; your customers and neighbors can buy “currency” usable only at your business, typically for 10 to 20 percent less than the face value
  • Local currency networks, such as Ithaca Hours (Ithaca, NY and vicinity) and BerkShares (Berkshire County, MA)
  • Computerized barter networks
  • Time trade networks, where an hour of a doctor’s labor is worth the same as an hour of a babysitter’s

Connect with Shel on Social Media
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About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriteraward-winning author of ten booksinternational speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.

He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).

“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”

Friends Who Want to Help

30-minute no-charge session with a master business and life coach
Posting this on behalf of my friend, colleague, and masterful coach Oshana Himot. I have benefitted enormously working with her. She’s really helped me crystalize the idea that I can shift my focus to turn hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war into peace, and catastrophic climate change into planetary balance—through the profit motive. Without her, I wouldn’t have done my TEDx talk, “Impossible is a Dare” (hear the talk and see the slides at http://www.business-for-a-better-world.com/tedtalks/ )
nor would I have written the new book.

She writes: “If you work to change society in positive waysI’m a skilled coach who can help you work through the stuck places and go forward… With a mix of both business and life coaching skills, and MBA, and a diversified set of tools, I work with you as the unique and wonderful person you are–and the amazing, powerful person you’d like to become. What you would like to achieve.

“How can this work can benefit you? Schedule a complimentary 30-minute session and find out. You can reach me at 602-463-6797 or through email at: oshana@oshanasjoywork.com.

Debbie Allen’s new book on Positioning—Yours at NO Cost
I’ve got an exciting gift for you! Download my friend Debbie Allen’s brand new book, EXPERT POSITIONING: How to Dominate Your Competition and Gain High Paying Clients at no cost. Expert Positioning is a great way to stand out and market your business; I’ve personally built my business with it. Debbie’s been in the expert space for decades. Her new book walks you through the process to setting up your expert business so you can easily gain higher paying clients and make more sales. Get your free copy now at www.ExpertDomination.com 

Hear and Meet Shel
I’ve been so busy getting the book done that I haven’t been booking talks lately. But that’s about to change! As the book launch draws closer, I expect to have several engagements. And remember—if you connect me with a paid speaking gig (OR a sponsor who will fund no-pay engagements), you can earn a very nice commission. Please write to me if you would like to help.


Just announced: a stellar looking Guerrilla Marketing Reunion with a lineup that includes Seth Godin, Jay Conrad Levinson’s widow Jeannie Levinson, Joel Comm, Loral Langemeier, and several other luminaries, November 2-4 in Orlando. Price is very reasonable. I’m going; how about you? http://guerrillamarketingfamilyreunion.com/ (Oh, and let me know if you’re a nonsmoker who’s interested in sharing a hotel room.)
Another Recommended Book: The Necessary Revolution
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The Necessary Revolution: How Individuals and Organizations Are Working Together to Create A Sustainable World, by Peter Senge, Nina Kruschwitz, Joe Laur, and Sara Schley

Most of the books I’ve been reviewing the last several years have been published relatively recently, often within three years. With a 2008 copyright, this book is outside of that pattern. And while there are pieces of it that are a bit dated—for instance, evaluating and praising BP’s actions on behalf of the environment pre-Deepwater, and of course the dramatic shifts in the fossil fuel climate due to new (and very invasive/destructive) technology and the concurrent shifts in the economy following the recession.

Yet about 90 percent of this book is still intensely relevant, and the orientation toward holistic approaches and working together from different sectors on common goals (e.g., corporate and NGOs or corporate and major government regulators) yields terrific examples and remarkable insights. I like the way it pays attention to both results and process, and demonstrates repeatedly that inclusivity —when combined with holistic thinking and powerful visioning—creates better, longer-lasting, more future-focused results. In other words, it’s not about being less bad, but about rethinking an entire way of doing things to create a greater good in the first place; they see the solution as based in innovation, not coercion—something Buckminster Fuller, who suggested that we humans learn to live on our energy income (i.e., renewables) rather than energy capital (fossil fuels), would agree with (p. 8). By working backward from the world we want to achieve, rather than patching the failures of today’s world, we can leapfrog the incremental small gains and totally rethink and reshape the business world, and heal the planet. So give it a whirl, even if you think 2007 data is too old.

Some of what you’ll learn will be about the changes brought about by the 20th century industrial model—like the shocking statistics that the number of cars in the world leapt from 50 million in 1950 to 800 million less than 60 years later (six times the growth in population), or that (as of 2007) 90 percent of all raw materials ended up as waste (p. 16).

But that second statistic is cause for hope, because it opens up the possibility to use resources far more effectively. If we can bring that 90 percent down to, say, 10 percent, that means we need far less mining, fewer landfills, less energy and water in manufacturing, use, and disposal, and many other benefits.

You’ll also learn powerful stories about individuals who led their organizations not just to a new understanding of how business can profit while serving a higher social and environmental good, but to new products and services—as well as new corporate structures and partnerships (with competitors, trade associations, NGOs/nonprofits, and government agencies), new tools for inclusive decision making and product creation, and new ways of doing business—based in that understanding. If you’ve followed what I’ve written about practical visionaries like Amory Lovins and Dean Cycon (both cited) over the years, or what I’ve written about partnership success strategies, it will not come as news.

Let’s make that hope much more concrete, by sharing just a few of the numerous case studies in the book:

  • After a bunch of folks from Xerox went on a guided wilderness retreat, they saw a Xerox copier rusting in a landfill. This caused an epiphany: they could design copiers that sent nothing to the landfill. Putting this into action meant addressing such issues as product lifecycle and energized the group to reinvent copier technology. While the defunct copier they saw had more than 2000 parts and was not easily disassembled, the Lakes Project model this team developed had just 200 parts and came apart easily for reuse and recycling, and kept 122,000,000 pounds of material out of landfills in a single year (pp. 288-289).
  • BMW, which had been developing plans to collect and recycle worn-out cars, expanded to create a consortium of all car manufacturers in the European Union, developed practical methods to design cars for eventual disassembly and reuse, and then went to the EU government as a united front, with workable plans for the makers to take end-of-life responsibility for their products. The EU adopted their recommendations, which avoided certain regulations the manufacturers felt were unrealistic or too restrictive while accomplishing the agreement to collect and recycle with essentially no pushback from industry—because industry designed the program (pp. 230-232, 248). 
  • Alcoa piloted a massive water reuse project in one plant, and saw an 85 percent reduction in water consumption (p. 182).
  • Meanwhile, Coca-Cola partnered with the global environmental group WWF to examine its total water footprint—including, for instance, the huge amount of water needed to grow its sugarcane. (It turns out that other beverages, including coffee and milk, also have enormous water footprints, once we factor in inputs like the amount a cow drinks.) This initiative got urban corporate executives, environmentalists, residents of environmentally sensitive areas, bottlers, and farmers talking to each other in new ways. (pp. 77-95; the case study doesn’t really address the results of the initiative, which was pretty new at the time).

Senge et al tell us it’s crucial to dream big, and to work from a primarily positive vision—that falling a few points short of a massive, world-changing goal is a much greater success than meeting a goal that’s too easy and doesn’t build change (pp. 293, 325-326).

A key point is that innovations, and movements, typically don’t originate at the centers of organizational power—there are exceptions, of course—but at the periphery, with production workers, managers of small units, etc. (p. 364), developing “creative tension” (pp. 294-296). Often, meaningful change happens when one employee champions the cause and makes it happen. Thus, the book features multiple Toolkit sections, which provide an illustrated overview of specific tools that help organizations grapple with these issues—including companies unaccustomed to giving line workers or unit managers a meaningful say in policy. One example is the five pages about understanding when participants are taking on any of four different roles in a meeting (pp. 276-280).

The authors include a zinger at the very end that could be its own book: a brief section (pp. 374-377) on the need to take these group process skills out beyond the human experience, and to not just take the needs of other species into account, but to design processes that include non-human partners. Reading about Amory Lovins’ active collaboration with apes who had learned to communicate with humans, co-designing an ape-friendly living environment, made me jump out of my chair and yell “Wow!”

There’s much more in this book. Go out and get it, read it carefully, and take lots of notes (I took five pages, and I have tiny handwriting).

The Clean and Green Club, August 2015

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, August 2015
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This Month’s Tip: How to Select Partners
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It’s been two years since we’ve visited one of my very favorite marketing strategies: forming partnerships with others who already reach the market you desire to reach.

Let’s talk today about how to select partners. You’ll find the best results when you and your marketing or operational partners both have a common understanding of how the partnership will help every partner. And your chances of that increase if at least one of these criteria is true:


1. Your products or services complement each other: You appeal to the same demographic/psychographic, but with products and services that work well in tandem (or in groups–like a one-stop wedding shop with florist, caterer, photographer, band, etc.).

2. You have similar offerings but join together to “make the pie higher” for all of you: cooperative advertising with several partners in one big ad that none of you could afford on your own, a big restaurant festival with 50 participants.

3. Similar customer/fan base with not too much overlap. This is the success secret of many Internet marketers. They promote each other’s products and each gain new fans.

4. Complementary operational expertise–like the partnership between FedEx and the United States Postal Service. FedEx is really good at logistics, and the PO is really good at last-mile delivery. So FedEx does the intercity air transport for Express Mail (and I think Priority as well) and the PO finishes the job. 

5. Charity/for-profit partnerships with organizations whose mission is aligned with your brand identity. A construction firm can partner with Habitat for Humanity, a restaurant with a food pantry. I’m using this strategy myself. I partnered with Green America for the release of my 8th book, Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green, and we’re doing it again for my forthcoming Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World. I get in front of their 100,000 or so members multiple times, and they get a portion of the first royalty check.

In short, the possibilities are limitless, and make the most sense when they’re carefully thought out and advance the interests of all parties.

Note that for option 1, you don’t have to work only with people who only offer services and products that you don’t. can even have overlap. Here’s an example the very early days of my business—1981-85, when it was primarily a typing service. I had referral partnerships with several other typing services. Any of us would be glad to type a college term paper or a business letter, but there were other areas that some of us liked and others couldn’t stand. The services I referred clients to happened to like transcribing tapes, which was a task I loathed. And they in turn hated working with resume clients who wanted more than straight typing.

Eventually, once I got my first computer in 1984, I was able to make resume writing my primary offering. From 1985-95, writing resumes while-you-wait was the largest profit center in my business, until I began to supplant it with writing marketing materials for businesses and authors/publishers, and later with the green and social change marketing I’m known for today.

Side note: I actually still offer all the things I used to concentrate on except straight typing. I don’t go out of my way to chase the business, but I still write resumes, press releases, book covers, and web pages when I’m asked. But while I’m glad to have had a “second college education” by typing those thousands of pages, I don’t miss that piece at all, and haven’t typed a term paper or thesis since around 1990.

Next month, we’ll look at the wide range of possible partnerships.


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About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriteraward-winning author of ten booksinternational speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.

He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).

“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
A Book I Recommend Only to Know Your Enemy
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The Moral Case for Fossil Fuels by Alex Epstein

In the 13 years I’ve been reviewing a book per month, this is my first negative review. Normally, if a book I’m reading is not good enough to share with you, I move on to one that is. There have been months it’s taken three tries to find a book worthy of reviewing.

But there’s been a lot of buzz about this book, and I felt it important to dispel some of the blatant falsehoods he’s spreading.

Epstein is a master at framing—and, if you’ve followed me for a while, you know that I also pay a lot of attention to framing. It’s a key marketing tool for ideas, especially—but also for products and services. I also give credit to Epstein for creating a well-written book that’s enjoyable to read. And I even agree with some of his arguments:

  • Humans live better because we’ve been able to harness energy—which has led to major improvements in shelter, agriculture, flood control, disaster response, etc.
  • Thus, cheap, plentiful energy has saved millions of lives and improved the quality of life for billions more.
  • Climate activists need to be careful of our science and not make outlandish claims. He points out that the 97 percent climate-scientist consensus that climate change is real and that human behavior is a factor in climate change is not the same as claiming that the same 97 percent feel an immediate need to act. The number is undoubtedly high, but there are some scientists who recognize that humans have increased CO2 levels but don’t see that as a problem.
  • CO2, which plants breathe and turn back into oxygen for us to breathe, is good for plants
  • Most energy company communications grant environmentalists the moral upper hand and don’t try to counteract the public’s image of these technologies as something that should be phased down. Epstein, a master at framing, says this is because the fossil and nuclear companies have failed to present the compelling moral case for their use. I say it’s because, in the face of better, cleaner alternatives, there is no such case for the moral superiority of a dirty technology; we have better ways of achieving our very real energy needs.
  • Humans can have a positive impact on climate change.

But Epstein ignores “inconvenient” facts that don’t fit his worldview, and makes assumptions I don’t agree with:

  • We can’t rely on clean renewables to meet the power demand. Solar and wind are too intermittent, and hydro requires flooding too large an area. Actually, we can. While, historically, solar, wind, geothermal, etc., have only generated a small sliver of our energy, they’re growing exponentially, and new technologies make them more affordable and more efficient. Amazing new developments in battery technology—as well as using the electrical grid itself to store power—solves the intermittence problem. And in-line hydro can capture the power of water without the need to build dams and flood farmland. Many experts believe we can meet 50 to 80 percent of our power society with clean energy within a fairly short time, when we reduce demand through deep conservation.
  • We must examine everything from the point of view of its effects on humans. I prefer to look at the effects on entire ecosystems, of which humans are a part. Other members of the ecosystem are entitled to life and health, too—and this helps humans as well. We don’t know what cures for diseases might be lost if the wrong plant goes extinct. And we do know that removing one predator from the food chain can sometimes have disastrous consequences.
  • Government meddling has kept nuclear from playing a major role. Actually, government subsidies and incentives (such as the Price-Anderson Act, which artificially lowers both the cost and the liability of nuclear insurance—switching financial responsibility for catastrophic accidents to property owners and taxpayers) are the only thing that keeps this extremely dangerous industry afloat.
  • The steep increase CO2 levels has not caused major problems. But the steep rise in CO2 levels is exponential, and the planet responds in geologic time. The 65 years between hitting 300 and 400 PPM is a microsecond in the earth’s time—and far shorter than the time from 200 to 300. We don’t know yet what the consequences are, because the earth is still reacting. And if that exponential curve continues to shoot up (800 PPM in another 65 years?), atmospheric carbon will continue to shoot up.
  • Major environmentalists including Amory Lovins, Bill McKibben, and others are a bunch of Luddite anti-progress know-nothings full of contempt for human beings and an evil agenda of undermining any impact technology could have. Absolute nonsense. Environmental leaders have for decades promoted the positive use of technology. Lovins in particular has built his entire career around using technology to reduce the need for fossil and nuclear by not just transitioning to safe, clean renewables, but designing more efficiently so that we can get the same or better results with dramatically reduced energy input. Many of these practical visionaries embrace a holistic world view that sees the importance of ecosystems, recognizes that humans have often been ecosystem disruptors, and sees human progress as key to helping get the world back in balance.