Category Archive for Uncategorized

The Clean and Green Club, August 2013

 
Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, 

August 2013
Before we get into this month’s tip—I’ve noticed that surprisingly few of my newsletter subscribers also subscribe to my blog. This month, I’m making a blatant attempt to get you to subscribe, by reprinting a slightly modified version of something that first appeared on the blog. Starting back in 2004, I’ve generally blogged up to three times a week, covering the intersections of ethics, politics, media, marketing, and sustainability.In addition to the reprinted post that is my main article this month, some entries over the past two months that you might enjoy or find useful include:

  • How to use copywriting skills in complaint letters (a guest post from Jack Forde, who does the wonderful Copywriters Roundtable newsletter that I’ve subscribed to for about ten years)
  • Links to/comments on important articles about utility pricing for purchasing solar power from users, Massachusetts meeting its solar goals years ahead of schedule, and on the impact of fracking on water safety
  • An analysis of the benefits and drawbacks of urban farming, as well as a tour of an urban farm in the Bronx (two separate posts)
  • My positive review of the new Bruce Springsteen movie
  • A look at some of the top green innovations in today’s world
  • Pushback from Europe on the US’s GMO-friendly farm policies
  • Challenging the data assumptions of a pro-nuclear article in Forbes

I’m a realist and I don’t expect you to drop everything and jump on my blog two or three times a week to see what I’m posting. That’s why I offer a subscription. New posts show up in your inbox, and you can either read them there or click over (if you want to follow a link, for instance). All you have to do is visit the blog page, http://greenandprofitable.com/shels-blog/ , look over at the top-right part of the gray section, just across from the headline, find “Get the Blog via Email,” and enter your e-address. If you don’t want to give your e-address (which I already have, since you subscribe to the newsletter), you’ll see “Networked Blogs: Follow This Blog” also on the right but near the very bottom of the page. That feature lets you subscribe via Facebook—just click on Follow this Blog.

Bonus tip: if you blog, set up subscriptions and become a subscriber. Then you’ll not only have a way to reach people in their inboxes, but also have an archive of all your posts.

This Month’s Tip
Avoid D-I-Y D-I-Sasters

Some things should always be left to professionals. You don’t ever want to trust me to do any carpentry for you…or even have me paint a room. And the older I get, the more I move from a D-I-Y (do-it-yourselfer) to a have-it-done.

Writing your own press release is something most people should not tackle. Here’s a comment I just made on a self-publishing discussion list in response to an advocate of D-I-Y press releases:

When I write a press release for a client, I spend significant time with the book. Sometimes I read the whole thing. Sometimes I read sections I’ve asked the author to flag, plus the beginning, end, and some random sections. Plus a synopsis, for fiction, and a thorough look at the TOC [table of contents] and Index for nonfiction. And always I read the author questionnaire I send, and the supporting materials I always request (such as press coverage of the author)…I read enough to thoroughly immerse myself in the project. And my press releases for clients have been picked up by the New York Times, among many other places.Yes, the author has far more subject knowledge than I do. But *I* have the expertise in crafting a message that the media, and the public, will find exciting. Most authors don’t, and believe me, I’ve seen their attempts.

One of the *problems* is the formulaic approach F___ recommends. Those formulas yield terrible press releases straight out of the 1970s. I don’t follow the formulas. I write press releases with the idea that the reader says “Wow! I want more of this.” Writing a standard reverse-pyramid 5Ws press release (who, what, where, when, why)–the most common formula–doesn’t accomplish that.

My favorite press release out of the probably thousands I’ve written was for a book on electronic privacy. If I followed the 5Ws formula, my release would have had a headline like “Electronic Privacy Expert Releases New Book.” How fast is the reporter going to hit delete on a big-snore headline like that? My headline was “It’s 10 O’Clock. Do You Know Where Your Credit History Is?” Following a lead about the credit history “vacationing” in databanks of big corporations, the book finally showed up in the third paragraph.

I refer to this type of press release as “the-story-behind-the-story,” and other than my own books, I don’t know a lot of books that teach how to do this… My book, Grassroots Marketing for Authors and Publishers, does give that context, and gives a lot of book-specific examples, including a wildly successful press release by listmate Ruth Houston that violates all the rules–proving that F___ is right that *some* authors can do their own press releases very effectively.

Some can do their own layout, too. I have discovered after laying out two books in my early publishing years, that I’m someone who should not ever lay out my own book. And most authors should not ever write their own press release.

In an earlier post in the same discussion, responding to a post that called professional publicity services a waste of money, I describe the advantages of a third alternative between do-it-yourself and pricy full-service publicists:

R___’s point is well-taken. With any expenditure, you want to be sure the results justify the expense.

And she’s right that most book publicists who are any good are frightfully expensive. Typically, you can expect to pay between $2000-$10,000 a month, with a 6-month commitment required. It takes a lot of sales to justify a $12-60K expenditure.

However, it’s not an either-or. There is a third alternative between doing it all yourself and spending $60K on a professional full-service publicist.

That alternative is hiring a la carte: use a professional writer to create a get-noticed media release that is likely to wildly outperform anything you do on your own, and then either hire one of the publicists who is willing to work a la carte and just do the distribution/follow-up, or use a wire service, or do it yourself with a list compiled by a media list specialist (such as our own Paul Krupin of Direct Contact PR).

As an example, I charge $325 to write but not distribute a news release on a book. I refer out to others for the other pieces for a few hundred more, and the total cost is under $1K. So if you did, say, six releases in a year, you’d still pay less than for one month of a high-end publicist.

Oh, and regarding the likelihood of better results: I had one client do a comparison test. He sent my release to half his media list, and one he’d written to the other half. He became a fan and a steady customer when mine got 6 times as many media responses.

One further lesson: these two posts demonstrate examples of promoting my own services on a discussion group while not making enemies—because the self-promotion is in the context of—and directly relevant to—a discussion already underway.

Reminder: this first appeared on my blog, along with a lot of other great content. You can easily subscribe—just visit the blog page, http://greenandprofitable.com/shels-blog/ and scroll down until you see “Get the Blog via Email” near the bottom. If you don’t want to give your e-address (which I already have, since you subscribe to the newsletter), you’ll see “Networked Blogs: Follow This Blog” a bit higher on the page.


Connect with Shel on Social Media
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About Shel & This Newsletter

As a marketing consultant and copywriter… award-winning author of eight books… international speaker, blogger, syndicated columnist — Shel Horowitz shows how green and ethical businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green competitors. His most recent book is category bestseller Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet. Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company

He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).

“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Hear & Meet Shel

Saturday and Sunday, September 7-8, my friend Steve Schappert is organizing the first GreenFest in Middlebury, Connecticut. I am not currently scheduled to speak, but I think I’ll be there at least one day. If you’re attending, let me know. http://greenfest.ws/

Thursday, September 26, 4 p.m. ET/1 p.m. PT. “Incorporating Values in Copy: When, Why and What to Avoid,” Speaking at Marcia Yudkin’s No-Hype Copywriting Telesummit. She has a great lineup. No charge to attend the live calls, and a bonus session if you choose to purchase the recordings. http://shelhorowitz.com/go/NoHype/

Saturday, September 28, 10:15 a.m. “Do-It-Yourself Book Marketing,” Amherst Publishing Fair, 99 Main Street, Amherst, MA, amherstareapublications@gmail.com $10 includes all events and fair admission from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Planning way ahead: May 10, 2014, I will once again be presenting at CAPA University, a one-day book publishing program in Hartford. More info: gaffney AT kanineknits.com
Friends who Want to Help

The Magic of GOOD Water
If you’ve been to Las Vegas, you might have noticed that the water tastes and feels wretched. I drink a lot of water, ever since I had a kidney stone (BIG ouch) about ten years ago; in most of Vegas, I had to really work at getting enough fluid. But I went to a conference there recently, and I noticed that in the conference rooms, the water was among the best I’d ever experienced—but in other parts of the hotel, and in other places we went in the area, the water seemed unfit to drink. And this was especially awkward because in the hot desert climate, keeping hydrated is crucial. I drank a whole lot of water from the conference rooms and felt great.

Then I met the water magician who made it happen: Patrick Durkin. Patrick has done a whole lot of research on water, and has tremendous knowledge about how to reduce disease, rid your water of toxins, and enjoy a great tasting natural beverage. And it turned out that Patrick had arranged to treat the conference water so that we had something not just fit to drink, but fit for kings and queens.

Since our bodies are mostly water, the quality of the water we drink can have a huge impact on our health, our mindset, and of course, our taste buds.

I asked Patrick if he would share his water wisdom with you. And I asked him if it was OK for you to bring friends to hear this information. He said yes, and we set a date far enough out that you can help spread the word. Please save this date: Tuesday, September 24, 8 pm ET/5 p.m. PT. And sign up for the call at http://greenandprofitable.com/the-magic-of-good-water 

Another Recommended Book: Green Illusions: The Dirty Secrets of Clean Energy and the Future of Environmentalism

Green Illusions: The Dirty Secrets of Clean Energy and the Future of Environmentalism by Ozzie Zehner (University of Nebraska Press, 2012)

What if everything we believe about alternative energy turns out to be wrong?

Green Illusions is both one of the most grim and one of the most hopeful books I’ve read in years. Be warned: the first two-thirds or so is the grim part.

Zehner knocks down one sacred cow after another, arguing that most of our most cherished energy alternatives are not any better than the fossil-fuel and nuclear status quo. He attacks:
• Photovoltaics (solar cells that turn sunlight into electricity, often shortened to PV)
• Wind
• Ethanol and other biofuels
• Hydrogen
• Electric and hybrid cars
• Large-scale hydro and geothermal

On what grounds? Most of his exhaustively researched arguments—documented in 60 pages of end notes and a 20-page index—center around what he sees as a failure to count all the costs of a particular technology. Those costs are not measured only in dollars, but also in energy consumed, raw materials mined (including rare earth metals), pollution during manufacturing, transportation, petroleum products, time and opportunities spent, maintenance/repair, and, of course, waste generation and disposal. And he says many of the most optimistic projections are based on erroneous data, and cannot scale up to be a meaningful part of the world’s energy picture.

And while I am skeptical of some of his findings, I’m not willing to write him off as any kind of crackpot. After all, I’ve been arguing for years that we have to count all the costs, and my book on the many problems with nuclear power draws heavily on our failure to do so. A future book I’ve begun working on positions this question as key to solving many of the world’s great problems.

I don’t have the science background to really evaluate his claims or the counterclaims by proponents of alternate technology. But I’d say that certainly we ought to be looking at these issues. We ought to make sure that our investments in alternative energy are appropriate, provide a net reduction in use of fossil and nuclear, clean our environment, and lower our carbon footprint. I believe, despite reading this book, that alternate technologies are a big part of the solution, and will continue to improve. But proponents must anchor this belief in fact.

With a lens focused primarily on the United States, Zehner argues that many of these technologies are nothing more than boondoggles: wildly overpriced and poorly performing “solutions,” often government-subsidized, that actually consume more energy than they generate, once all the factors during their lifecycle are figured in.

He also argues—and this I agree with—that until we get out of the headspace of “productivism” and consumerism, the idea that we can simply generate, purchase, use, and throw away infinite amounts of stuff—we will never solve our energy problems.

He also worries that adding these many alternative technologies won’t actually reduce the demand for conventional fuels, because we are simply adding new capacity rather than replacing existing polluting and warming ones. And hybrid cars promote sprawl, which in turn increases energy demand substantially.

Now, for the hopeful part. Zehner sees many areas where we can change our mindset, slash energy use and carbon footprint, and actually make progress. For starters, he notes that even very developed parts of the world, such as Germany and
Scandinavia, use far less energy per capita than the United States does. Bringing US energy consumption down to European levels would not even interfere in any meaningful way with typical American lifestyles, and could be done quickly and easily with existing technology.

A lot of this could be accomplished with policy and regulation shifts. Right now, much US policy creates incentives for waste, overconsumption, and sprawl. He suggests a number of policy initiatives that would encourage conservation, sustainable development, and reuse.

He does identify some technologies, including smart electric grids, solar thermal or solar light concentration, and greater efficiency, that do in fact take us in a deeply positive direction. My experience as a homeowner bears this out. Our solar hot water system, installed in 2001 (in cloudy, cold Massachusetts) has performed very well. Our little 1kw PV system has been a disappointment. But some of my neighbors with large PV arrays claim significantly better results. I would think that in places like Arizona and New Mexico, solar PV’s performance ratios would be substantially better.

Like Twitter Forward

Since When Are Libraries Known for Brilliant Marketing?

This month’s marketing lesson comes from one of the best examples of marketing ju-jitsu I’ve ever seen.

In ju-jitsu (a/k/a jiu-jitsu), like many martial arts, you use the strength of your opponent, rather than your own strength, and deflect it back on him or her. You get to still be nonviolent and righteous, while your opponent is lying in a heap on the floor.

Similarly, in marketing ju-jitsu (a term that may have been coined by Max Lenderman in 2001), you can overcome an opponent with far greater resources who can afford to hire wildly talent advertising agencies and saturate the airwaves with the result.

In the business world, the classic examples are car rental giant Avis’s “we’re only #2 so we try harder” campaign, Volkswagen’s Small Wonder ads from the 1960s, and of course, the legendary Smash Big Brother ad that debuted the Apple Macintosh in 1984.

In the anti-business world, the day in 1967 Abbie Hoffman and the Yippies threw dollar bills on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange comes to mind, as do many of the Adbusters campaigns, such as Buy Nothing Day.

So what does this kind of guerrilla marketing have to do with libraries? Librarians are thought of as a quiet bunch who rarely make any kind of public stink (though this is actually not true—just ask progressive author and filmmaker Michael Moore, whose book Stupid White Men was saved by a national campaign by librarians).

Well, here’s a video (less than three minutes long) outlining a particularly intense use of marketing ju-jitsu: threatened by a Tea Party campaign to defund the library, supporters created a fake campaign in favor of book burning, even saying the event would include live music and refreshments generating massive backlash. They then revealed their true agenda: to raise consciousness that “closing a library is like burning books.” This in turn resulted in a massive outpouring of library supporters on Election Day that easily defeated the defunding initiative. And both the book burning announcement and the later clarification got lots of social media buzz and the attention of thee press nationally.

Go watch it now. I’ll wait.

Back? Good.

I’d love you to share the takeaways you got in the comments, below. Here are some of mine:

  • Memes have a lot of power. Revulsion against book burning is a deep-seated response to centuries of oppression. Whether in 15th-century Spain, 18th-century America, Nazi-era Germany, or the late Ray Bradbury’s fictional dystopia Fahrenheit 451, book burning is seen as an attempt to suppress and control thought.
  • Reductio ad absurdumarguments—taking a line of thinking past its logical conclusion iinto the realm of the ridiculous—still work.
  • Even without funding, an organized populace can defeat injustice, especially when we make it a mom-and-apple-pie issue. (This was the approach we used when we saved our local mountain.)
  • Please share yours in the comments, below.

The Clean & Green Club, April 2012

The Clean & Green Club April 2012
CONTENTS
Twitter, Part 2
Just for You
Hear & Meet Shel
Friends/ Colleagues
Book Review
Connect with Shel on Social Media:

Twitter

Facebook Profile

LinkedIn

Blog

Green and Ethical Marketing Facebook

Google+ 


 

About Shel & This Newsletter
As a marketing consultant and copywriter… award-winning author of eight books… international speaker, blogger, syndicated columnist — Shel Horowitz shows how green and ethical businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green competitors.

His most recent book is category bestseller Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet.

Shel also helps authors/publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.

Shel began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).

“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions–because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”

Twitter, Part 2: What to Tweet

Twitter Bird

A key principle: Twitter is about building relationships over time.

That means if all you do is shout sales messages, you’re wasting most of Twitter’s potential. Yes, if you have a popular brand or retail store, your customers do want information about bargains. But they also want to feel like a human being is talking — and listening.

Personally, I strive for a ratio that is no more than 10 percent blatant self-promotion. The other 90% is a mix of passing on links to interesting information (often by retweeting someone else, with acknowledgment), responding to requests for — or asking for — advice, commenting on news or trends, engaging directly with people (responding or passing on a tweet, saying thank-you to people who have retweeted me, mentioned me as someone to follow, or mentioned my latest book (Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green), or just bringing a smile with a quote or a cool picture.

However, if other people say nice things about me or my offerings, I will retweet and/or thank them, and I don’t count that toward the 10 percent.

I guess it must be working, as I get 20 to 50 new followers in a typical week, all of them earned organically, without any game-the-system crap.

Last month’s Twitter, Part 1 newsletter brought this comment from Sherry Lowry in Austin, TX (@sherrylowry on Twitter):

“I really love Twitter (or actually the Twitter-related tools) and was expecting when reading your March news to either

- see clips from your Twitter stream

- a chance to click right into or follow you

Ask and ye shall receive, at least this time. To follow me on Twitter, visit @ShelHorowitz or http://www.twitter.com/shelhorowitz

And here are five of my Tweets (all posted April 1). You’ll notice they illustrate several of the types above.

RT @TalkAboutIssues
Fact: President Ronald Reagan, an icon to most conservatives, supported increases in the debt limit 12 times over his two terms.#Obama2012 [Retweet]

Blog: How Southwest Airlines is Greening Their Planes http://greenandprofitable.com/how-southwest-airlines-is-greening-their-planes/ [passing on interesting links--in this case, an automatic post to Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn from my blog]

Fabulous! Beethoven’s 9 10,000 in the chorus, Japan http://www.youtube.com/embed/paH0V6JLxSI[passing on an interesting link that I found elsewhere]

@maddow I’m hoping for 39 x 3 more years of your speaking truth to power. Very happy birthday. [engaging directly, in this case with TV commentator Rachel Maddow]

RT @SW_Coalition: Denise Hamler of @GreenAmerica will be hosting@ShelHorowitz for a talk on green business at (cont) http://tl.gd/goltff [Retweet of someone else's tweet that promotes me]

I’m a pretty active Tweeter, so you can see lots more at https://twitter.com/shelhorowitz

Just For You: JV Telesiminar with Robert Smith  

June 19, 7 pm ET/4 p.m. PT

I’m a long-time fan of joint ventures (JVs), because they let you go to new markets and audiences on the arm of someone they already know and trust I used JVs to reach 5 million people for the launch of my most recent book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green — versus the roughly 25,000 I can reach on my own.

Robert, a JV expert, approached me recently about doing a program for you. I listened to one of his earlier programs and thought you would benefit by having me bring him in, You’ll learn:

  • How to set up Joint Ventures to make fast cash — sometimes in just a few hours using your phone book
  • Secret method for mailing 10,000 sales letters per month…at no cost…not even postage
  • An amazing strategy for telling 200 million people about your business for FREE
  • How to dominate your local market as a JV Dealmaker
  • How to use publicity to get potential joint venture partners to call you
  • Sneaky way to get $5000 a month in free radio promotions
  • From O to $1.5 MM using joint venture strategies

Robert Smith is president of Champion Media Worldwide, a public relations and marketing firm in Loves Park, IL. He has mastered the art of joint venture deals and teaches others how to spot hidden opportunities to help their businesses.

Hear & Meet Shel                     
 

Not one, but three major telesummits on environmental themes in April (Earth Day is that month, after all). Read on for details.

MONDAY, 4/16 I’m on the first day’s program for the Green Business Entrepreneurs Success Summit: How You Can Unite Purpose and Profit for a Sustainable Planet, organized by Lorna Li as an “alternative green MBA.” http://shelhorowitz.com/go/GreenBusinessEntrepreneurs/ My topic: Making Green Sexy: Guerrilla Marketing Tactics for Small Green Businesses, and I’m on at 5 pm ET/2 pm PT. Other presenters include Alisa Gravitz, Executive Director of Green America; Steven Hoffman, co-founder of LOHAS Journal and LOHAS Forum; Jacqui Ottman, author of The New Rules of Green Marketing, Elena Christopoulos, Interim President of the Green Chamber of Commerce (among others). No charge for this series!

4/21, Amherst, MA Exhibiting at the third annual Amherst Sustainability Fair, on the common, 10-4. http://www.amherstma.gov/index.aspx?NID=683  1200 exhibitors, live music…and fun.

4/26, Interview with Wendy Meyeroff — to listen, 347-884-8365; to ask questions before the show wendy@piggybankpromotions.com

4/29 Goodall and I are also among the presenters for the Better World Forum, another remarkable telesummit on the last two weekends in April — along with Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Deepak Chopra and others. Again, I feel very honored to be included. You can bring down the already-low cost ($49 another $10, to just $39 — if you use my link: http://shelhorowitz.com/go/BetterWorldForum/. I’ll be airing Sunday, April 29, 1-2 pm ET/10-11 am PT

5/1, Houston, TX Speaking at the Gulf Coast Green conference in Houston, May 1: “Making Green Sexy.” http://gulfcoastgreen.org/pages/default.asp

Also remember, if you set me up an engagement, you could earn a generous commission.

Friends/Colleagues Who Want to Help 
 

Spring of Sustainability 2012I’ve listened to several calls from ShiftNetwork’s latest telesummit, Spring of Sustainability, and they are amazing. I’m so proud to be one of the presenters, along with such planet-changers as Jane Goodall (legendary for her work in Africa with chimpanzees), Bill McKibben (climate activist and founder of 350.org), Vandana Shiva (Indian activist who took on Coca-Cola), Van Jones (former White House Green Jobs czar and funder of Color of Change), John Robbins (visionary who puts the Baskin-Robbins fortune to good use), Hazel Henderson (author of Ethical markets and many other key works), Frances Moore Lappé (Diet for a Small Planet and other books, decades of food and democracy activism) John Perkins (Confessions of an Economic Hitman), Thom Hartmann (progressive radio host and author), Aqeela Sherrills (campaigner against gang violence and government violence), Julia Butterfly Hill (she lived in a tree for months to save it from being cut down), Vicki Robin (Your Money or Your Life), Hunter Lovins (energy pioneer and co-author of Natural Capitalism), Joel Makower (founder of GreenBiz.com), John Trudell (American Indian and earth activist)…WOW! Many of the interviews will be aired between now and June 22; for those you’ve missed (including mine), you can unlimited access to the replays for a very reasonable price of about $2 per session ($147 altogether). http://shelhorowitz.com/go/SpringOfSustanability/

GreenAmerica’s GreenFest
comes to NYC for the first time, April 21-22. I spoke at this event in Washington, DC a year and a half ago, and loved it. Unfortunately, I have to miss it, as I’m exhibiting in Amherst that weekend and haven’t 
figured out how to clone myself. I’d originally planned to just come in for Sunday, but the best speakers are on Saturday. http://www.greenfestivals.org/ 

IPNE Publishing Conference
Independent Publishers of New England
The Independent Publishers of New England (an organization I founded sometime around 1999) 2nd Annual New England Publishing Conference “Embracing the Past, Imagining the Future” inBoxborough MA, April 27-28 with speakers Robert Gray (who writes for Shelf Awareness) and Chris Morrow (owner of Northshire Books).

A cram-packed two day opportunity to further your publishing plans withaccess to experts and ample time for networking at a bargain price.http://www.ipne.org

Another Recommended Book: Become an Award Winning Company
 

Become an Award Winning CompanyBecome an Award Winning Company: 7 Steps to Unlock The Million Dollar Secret Every Entrepreneur Needs to Know, by Matt Shoup (Shoup Consulting, 2012)

It sounds like a thin premise for a marketing book: go out and win some awards. After all, I cover the subject in just a few pages in some of my own books on marketing. In one of my books, winning awards shares a chapter on credibility building with getting endorsements and reviews.

But breaking a process down step by step is often a worthy endeavor, and in this case Shoup provides good food for thought.

The bulk of the book is devoted to the good things that can happen to an award-winning company that understands how to leverage and market those awards (including a bunch of interviews with CEOs of award-winning companies about the specific ways their achievement helped their business). A smallish section at the end goes through the how-to of actually winning awards. I might have reversed both placement and proportion, but maybe that’s because I do have a very clear understanding of the benefits already (and have won quite a few awards over the years).

Shoup himself sums up the case for winning awards nicely and succinctly on page 171: “As an award-winning company, you are going to be able to go out and attain massive success, exposure, credibility, free PR, and more business.” And a lot of the book shows how he and the CEOs he profiles have done just that.

More than the specifics, where this book really shines is in three consistent approaches to the success mindset:

1.To win awards, you must achieve excellence: base your company in high integrity, wow your customers, and establish a culture that drives the best people to join your staff and succeed with you.

2.This excellence allows you to thrive in economic downturns (he has a great rant on this) and to set and achieve goals a lot more easily.

3.Success doesn’t just happen to you; you go out and make it happen, and that means when you do win awards, it’s up to you to extract the maximum possible benefit from them in your marketing.

That last is important. Used properly, awards let you de-commoditize your business, get away from the tire-kickers and bargain hunters, and establish the value of working with an excellent company and being wiling to pay for it.

One thing that puzzles me: Shoup apparently gave no thought to becoming an award-winning *author.* The cover and interior design are amateurish, and the book would have benefited from one more edit (with someone who understands when a phrase like “award winning” should or should not take a hyphen). It would have been easy enough to spend a few hundred bucks more on a better production and then enter some good awards for the book, especially if he wants to build up the coaching and speaking parts of his own business (his primary line of work is running a house painting company).

GetResponse.com
http://www.GetResponse.com

The Clean & Green Club, March 2012

The Clean & Green Club March 2012
 
CONTENTS
Why Tweet?
…Next Book…
Hear & Meet Shel
Friends/ Colleagues
Book Review
 
New Format

Thank you for all your comments on the new format. Overwhelmingly, most respondents like the new HTML version. We will try to work on the display issues some people are experiencing.

We did have a winner of the e-book.


 

About Shel & This Newsletter
As a marketing consultant and copywriter… award-winning author of eight books… international speaker, blogger, syndicated columnist — Shel Horowitz shows how green and ethical businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green competitors.

His most recent book is category bestseller Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet.

Shel also helps authors/publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.

Shel began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).

“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions–because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”

         
  Why Tweet? 
(March 2012 Tip) 
 

Twitter BirdIf you’ve been reading my newsletter for several years, you know I’ve been marketing through social media all the way back to 1995. These days, a lot of my social media goes into Twitter.

People either love Twitter or hate it. My wife can’t stand it; I think it’s great.

Why?

  • You can have a big impact while investing almost no time
  • It’s easy to gain very targeted followers — and influential “followees” (people you follow)
  • Very short learning curve
  • Interface stays reasonably constant, and the changes are improvements that make sense (unlike Facebook, where you have to keep relearning how to do it, or frequently discover that the expensive tools and processes you invested in before the latest redesign are now them obsolete)
  • Third-party tools like TweetDeck (now owned by Twitter), MarketMeSuite, and HootSuite add enormous functionality: scanning the most important contacts quickly, searching topics, scheduling ahead, adding users to groups quickly
  • Trends, posts, and connections can easily go viral through the power of retweets and other devices — and as they do, you can easily expand your circles of influence
  • You can build real relationships with people by responding personally to their tweets
  • While there are lots of ways around the 140-character limit, it does force you to sharpen your brain and be concise
  • Oh yeah, and it’s fun!

I find Twitter a terrific research tool: I get a lot of my information on new trends in the green, business, and  political worlds by following links. I also find it a great way to get into conversations with people I haven’t met before, some of whom are very well-connected. Often, I’ll start a conversation on Twitter and then move it to 1-to-1 e-mail.

Twitter is also a great way to get noticed by speakers: if you tweet highlights of their talks or Twitter chat presentations — and either include a designated hashtag for the event (e.g., #sustainchat) and/or mention them by their Twitter handle (e.g., @ShelHorowitz), you’ll get on their radar. I can tell you that when someone puts @ShelHorowitz in a tweet, I go visit their profile unless it’s obvious spam, and usually follow back. And when someone at a networking event tells me he or she follows me on Twitter, I pay closer attention.

And yes, I’ve sold books, started conversations about my consulting, copywriting or speaking, and attended networking events that I learned about on Twitter.

This is the first of a three-part series. Next month, what you can tweet, and in May, what Twitter is NOT.

         
  Be in My Next Book with Your Book Marketing Success Story!    

I’m revising my 2007 book Grassroots Marketing for Authors and Publishers, and looking for a few more good recent success stories — the more “out-of-the-box,” the better.

I am thinking about chunking up the book into several smaller e-volumes, to take advantage of the Kindle/Nook market — and if this works well, I might repeat the strategy with my consumer book on frugal fun.

Anyway, please submit stories of 500 words or less, using this link to generate a subject line I’ll spot:
mailto:shel@principledprofit.com?subject=BookMarketingSuccessForGMAP

Submission constitutes permission to reprint in the book and in any publicity and warrants that you have the right to submit the material. If I use your material, you’ll get a copy of the mini-e-book that includes it.

         
  Hear & Meet Shel                       

Not one, but three major telesummits on environmental themes in April (Earth Day is that month, after all). Read on for details.

3/19 Triangle Variety Radio has me as a guest Monday, March 19, 8 pm ET/5 pm PT, discussing “Making Green Sexy: Marketing Strategies that Any Business Can Use to Profit in the Rapidly Growing Green Market. http://trianglevarietyradio.com/ and click “Log In To Our Radio Show” or Skype to 949-272-9578; (I’m told only Skype will work — which I find very odd)

3/24, Greenfield, MA Speaking on how artists and businesses can benefit from working together at Creative Economy Summit III: Fostering our Local Economy: Art and Business in Partnership March 23 and 24, 2011, Downtown Greenfield, MA, http://www.creativeeconomysummit.com/ — my session is from 2-3:15 pm Saturday, March 24

4/2 I’m still pinching myself that I am one of the speakers at the amazing Spring of Sustainability telesummit, along with environment rockstars like Jane Goodall (legendary for her work in Africa with chimapnzees), Bill McKibben (climate activist and founder of 350.org), Vandana Shiva (Indian activist who took on Coca-Cola), Van Jones (former White House Green Jobs czar and funder of Color of Change), John Robbins (visionary who puts the Baskin-Robbins fortune to good use), Hazel Henderson (author of Ethical markets and many other key works), Frances Moore Lappé (Diet for a Small Planet and other books, decades of food and democracy activism) John Perkins (Confessions of an Economic Hitman), Thom Hartmann (progressive radio host and author), Aqeela Sherrills (campaigner against gang violence and government violence), Julia Butterfly Hill (she lived in a tree for months to save it from being cut down), Vicki Robin (Your Money or Your Life), Hunter Lovins (energy pioneer and co-author of Natural Capitalism), Joel Makower (founder of GreenBiz.com), John Trudell (American Indian and earth activist)…WOW! Sessions start March 26 and go through June 22. My slot is April 2, 3-3:30 pm ET/noon-12:30 pm PT. http://shelhorowitz.com/go/SpringOfSustanability/ No cost, and all the calls get recorded. If you don’t sign up for this series, I have to question your judgment. Even if you only manage to listen to a few of these world-changing visionaries, why would you want to miss out?

4/16 I’m on the first day’s program for the Green Business Entrepreneurs Success Summit: How You Can Unite Purpose and Profit for a Sustainable Planet, organized by Lorna Li as an “alternative green MBA.” http://www.greenbusinessentrepreneurs.com/ My topic: Making Green Sexy: Guerrilla Marketing Tactics for Small Green Businesses, and I’m on at 5 pm ET/2 pm PT. Other presenters include Alisa Gravitz, Executive Director of Green America; Steven Hoffman, co-founder of LOHAS Journal and LOHAS Forum; Jacqui Ottman, author of The New Rules of Green Marketing, Elena Christopoulos, Interim President of the Green Chamber of Commerce (among others). No charge for this series either!

4/21, Amherst, MA Exhibiting at the third annual Amherst Sustainability Fair, on the common, 10-4. http://www.amherstma.gov/index.aspx?NID=683

4/26, Interview with Wendy Meyeroff — to listen, 347-884-8365; to ask questions before the show wendy@piggybankpromotions.com

4/29 Goodall and I are also among the presenters for the Better World Forum, another remarkable telesummit on the last two weekends in April — along with Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Deepak Chopra and others. Again, I feel very honored to be included. You can bring down the already-low cost ($39 through April 12, or $49 afterward) another $10, to just $29/$39 — if you use my link: http://shelhorowitz.com/go/BetterWorldForum/. I’ll be airing Sunday, April 29, 1-2 pm ET/10-11 am PT

5/1, Houston, TX Speaking at the Gulf Coast Green conference in Houston, May 1: “Making Green Sexy.” http://gulfcoastgreen.org/pages/default.asp

Also remember, if you set me up an engagement, you could earn a generous commission.

   
  Friends Who Want to Help  

ShiftNetwork’s latest telesummit, Spring of Sustainability, is going to be amazing, and I’m so proud to be one of the presenters. See description in the Hear & Meet Shel section. http://shelhorowitz.com/go/SpringOfSustanability/

Vrinda Normand is another one who puts on great telesummits, and hers are focused on marketing for conscious companies. Her latest, Irresistible List Building Summit, runs from March 13 (yeah, you’ve missed a few) through April 6 and includes people like Lisa Sasevich, Denise Wakeman, Kendall Summerhawk, Nancy Juetten, Christian Mickelsen, and Adam Urbanski. The headline: “How to Attract 1,000s of Your Ideal Clients Online So You Can Make the Big Impact You Were Born For” — nice use of Ultimate Benefits copywriting strategy there.  :-). Another event with no cost. http://shelhorowitz.com/go/VrindaListBuilding/

GreenAmerica’s GreenFest comes to NYC for the first time, April 21-22. I spoke at this event in Washington, DC a year and a half ago, and loved it. I intend to be there Sunday, but I’m not on the program.

Two Book Launches with Lots of Bonuses

360 Degrees of Influence: Get Everyone to Follow Your Lead on Your Way to the Top
by NYT Bestselling author Harrison Monarth

In 360 Degrees of Influence, Monarth provides everything you need to gain the trust and respect of those around you — no matter where they’re positioned in the organizational hierarchy — and expand your influence well beyond your immediate environment. Become the most psychologically astute person in the room — so you can be the most influential leader in the room. Learn how to:

  • Assess your current influencing power
  • Overcome resistance to your ideas and proposals
  • Know what people are thinking and feeling — even better than they do
  • Avoid the most common decision-making pitfalls
  • Create an influence strategy tailored to your organization’s hierarchy

March 22 is the launch for If I’m So Smart, Why Can’t I Get Rid of This Clutter? Tools to Get it Done! by Sallie Felton

Are you conquering your clutter — or is your clutter conquering you? Author and life coach Sallie Felton, walks you through the practical and organizational strategies that make it easy to stay organized; but this book goes deeper and uncovers the hidden reasons why it can be so hard to get clutter free and stay that way.

       
  Another Recommended Book: Writing to Make a Difference: 25 Powerful Techniques to Boost Your Community Impact, by Dalya F. Massachi  

If you want to communicate clearly, you have to write clearly. If you want to write clearly, you want this book.

While her focus is tilted toward grassroots and nonprofit/not-for-profit community organizations, about 98 percent of her advice is equally applicable to business — especially green, socially conscious, ethical businesses that need to communicate a bigger message than “buy my stuff.”

Massachi has a light touch that turns a could-have-been-deadly subject into an enjoyable read, and the textbook-like format is full of exercises, nice little interjections, personal experience, and such. Which makes it a lot more palatable than the grammar and style textbooks of my youth. I’d even go so far as to say that this is a book that I’d have liked to have written, and certainly one I wish I’d had when I was starting my career as a social-change and environmental action writer.

Still, I wanted to take it a little at a time, so I could absorb it properly. Now that I’ve gotten all the way through, I’m sure I’ll be referring to it when I hit a grammar snag.

Not to say the book is perfect. Some of the later chapters get a bit bogged down in grammatical minutiae, and there are a few places where I would argue with her style choices. Example: call me old-fashioned, but to me, the only time you’d use an apostrophe after a set of initials is as a possessive: “NGO’s” can *only* mean “belonging to an NGO” [Non-Governmental Organization]. But to Dalya, a generation younger than me, using that construction as a plural noun is a valid if unfortunate choice.

Be sure to read the appendices; otherwise, you’ll miss the excellent brief sections on writing for audio and video, as well as a wonderful list of “visionary” trigger words (right after a list of marketing trigger words) — these are the words that tug at our readers’ heartstrings and help us frame the narrative. And that’s something that far too often, progressives have been clumsy with.

A must for the shelf of any serious business or nonprofit writer, and even more so for employees or managers who are not writers but get thrown a writing project (if they don’t want to contact someone like Dalya or me to do it for them). Nicely indexed and crammed with resources, too. http://dfmassachi.net/.

 
GetResponse.com
http://www.GetResponse.com
 
 

Shel Horowitz’s Clean & Green Newsletter, December 2011

In This Issue…

If you celebrate any holidays in December, I wish you a joyous season.

Will YOU be the One to Get a Brand New $1299 Multifunction Printer from Dell?

A few weeks ago, I received a gift of a very spiffy Dell 3335dn multifunction printer, which not only prints two-sided at high resolution from any computer on our network, but also scans, copies, e-mails, and stores documents in its memory. I have to tell you, even though I’ve gotten along just fine without in-house copying and faxing capabilities, I’m finding that I really enjoy having them.

Because the company is courting the green market for this printer (which not only can print both sides of the paper but also has some cool energy management features), Dell’s promotion team came to me and asked if I’d like to give one of these printers away. Of course, I agreed. But I put a condition on it. Rather than just give one away randomly, I’ll give it to the person who submits the best sustainability tip via my Twitter account during the giveaway days.

So you’ll be rewarded for your thinking processes, and probably not facing an enormous number of entries. In other words, if you give this your best shot, you’ll have a much better chance of winning than in most contests.

And five runners-up get a copy of my very useful e-book, Painless Green: 111 Tips to Help the Environment, Lower Your Carbon Footprint, Cut Your Budget, and Improve Your Quality of Life-With No Negative Impact on Your Lifestyle.

Disclosure: as is obvious from above, I got one of these printers as a gift and have been using it steadily ever since.

By entering, you agree to both my rules and Dell’s rules for the contest. You’ll find both sets of rules posted at http://painlessgreenbook.com/win-a-1299-printer-december-16-19-2011

Good luck!

This Month’s Tip: Market With Video, Part 1

In this two-part series, I’ll first introduce the context of video marketing in today’s world–which is quite different from even a few years ago. Next month, I’ll follow up with specific things to keep in mind when shooting a video, and some ideas for what kind of content to create.

There are probably at least 1001 ways to promote a product or a service with video–a medium that penetrates the brain like no other (as we’ve known since the popularization of television began more than 60 years ago). Video used to require considerable technical skill and a whole pile of expensive equipment. But these days, anyone can shoot and produce a video. All you need is a pocket video camera or (for interviews) even just a Skype account with the call recorder add-on; distribution is as simple as uploading to a video sharing site like Youtube, Vimeo, Viddler, Ustream, or their many competitors.

(Note: For some purposes, I still advise professional production; the quality will be way better. Your speaker demo reel, for instance, should absolutely be done by a pro, and so should anything that you expect to go head-to-head with footage shot by big studios. But you can do a lot with homegrown videos.)

Video is enormously popular. This list of more than 300 video sharing sites <http://www.reelseo.com/list-video-sharing-websites/> includes Alexa rank (how much they get visited) and Google Page Rank (a vague indication of how much search engines like them). Astoundingly, 46 sites have an Alexa rank better than 1000. That means out of the roughly 300 million websites in the entire world, 46 of the 1000 most-visited websites exist to share video. And many of these sites allow user submissions of videos.

Alexa’s own Top Sites page gives Youtube the number 3 position in both the world and the United States, trailing only Google (which owns Youtube) and Facebook (data checked 12/12/11).

On Youtube, and presumably other sites, you can set up a branded URL for your own channel, building name recognition. You can also easily embed a video hosted on any of these sites into your own web pages and even e-mails.

And don’t forget that these sites are typically non-exclusive. You can post the same video on multiple sites, which may be especially useful if there’s a niche video site covering your area of expertise.

Friends Who Want to Help

Guerrilla Marketing Intensive–$1000 discount just for you

My co-author, Jay Conrad Levinson, “the Father of Guerilla Marketing,” has a few seats left in his next Guerrilla Marketing Intensive, at his Florida home, January 23rd-25th. 21 hours of training over three days. Normally $4997 (payable in up to four installments)–but Jay’s manager (his daughter Amy) has offered a $1000 discount to my subscribers. Limited to just ten people, so this is pretty in-depth. https://gmarketing.infusionsoft.com/go/Int/shelhoro/ If you want my opinion about whether Jay knows his stuff, read my rave review elsewhere in this issue of Guerrilla Marketing Remix.

To get this special rate, just click this link: mailto:olympiagal@aol.com?subject=Discount?cc=shel@frugalfun.com to tell Amy you want the $1000 off for Shel’s subscribers (Also tell her whether you prefer an online payment link or prefer to call in your payment info).

Increase Your Happiness Quotient

Remember the hit song, “Don’t Worry…Be happy?” But how do you GET happy without worrying? Ana Weber’s book/course, “The Happiness Thermometer,” can give you more than a few clues to increase your happiness quotient without having to worry about it. http://3bl.me/rb3y6n

Coop-themed Poetry Contest for Middle Schoolers

Know a middle-schooler who likes to write? Cheese and milk co-op Cabot is doing a poetry contest for students in grades 5-8, on the cooperative spirit. Winner not only gets a cash prize, but his or her poem on a Cabot butter box. For details: http://potatohill.com/files/2011-PoetryContest.pdf

D’vorah Lansky Wants to Help with Your Book Promotion
Virtual Book Tour Course: http://3bl.me/ewsged

Hear & Meet Shel

December
January
  • 1/4/12: Visit http://bigamericangiveaway.com/–I’m that day’s Massachusetts sponsor, and I’ll have some cool stuff for you: a gratis copy of my e-book Painless Green, and a $25 gift certificate good toward any consultation or copywriting. Same Deal applies to the London page of http:// bigbritishgiveaway.com on January 17.
February
  • In negotiation to speak at conferences in Bangladesh and Switzerland. Nothing definite yet.
April
  • 4/2/12: I’m thrilled to announce that I’ll be doing a program for The Shift Network. For a year now, I’ve been listening to many of their calls, interviewing the creme de la creme of experts in sustainability and global consciousness. I’ll be part of the Green Business track of the ambitious Spring of Sustainability program, which also features such luminaries as Paul Hawken, Bill McKibben, Hunter Lovins, David Korten, Frances Moore Lappe and Duane Elgin. You will want to sign up for this entire series. I plan to listen to as many of the calls as possible. Watch for the registration link (no cost, I believe) in a future issue.
Also remember–if you set me up an engagement, you could earn a generous commission.

 

Another Recommended Book: The New Relationship Marketing by Mari Smith

About 80 percent of Mari Smith’s new book is about social media–but I’d say the other 20 percent might be worth the closest look.

That’s because Smith is not only a believer in meeting face-to-face, but a brilliant tactician who uses her prodigious online skills to totally win over the people she meets offline (at conferences, for example)–and tells you exactly how to do the same.

Using a powerful yet very accessible set of online research tools to steer her face-to-face encounters, Smith creates quite a bit of “wow factor” by integrating online comments about her presentation directly into the speech, in real time–and to not just show up very prepared to network with other speakers and attenders, but to have impressed them so much ahead of (as well as during) the event that they actually seek you out.

Smith outlines how she does this, step by step, in Chapter 7 of her new book, The New Relationship Marketing: How to Build a Large, Loyal, Profitable Network Using the Social Web (John Wiley and Sons, 2011). She titles the chapter, Go Offline to Optimize Your Online Marketing–but I’d actually flip that around. Really, it’s about going *online* to maximize your *offline* marketing.

While that chapter alone would be worth buying the book, it’s typical of the other good stuff, all based on the idea of using “radical strategic visibility” to build real relationships in business. She encourages businesses to think beyond B2B (business-to-business) and B2C (business-to-consumer) to “P2P”–people-to-people. For instance, she talks about how to get your A-list–the people you want to impress–to see you as a valued colleague…what parts of your social media presence you should and should not delegate, and why…how to recovery gracefully and with minimal damage from a social-media faux pas…how businesses with purely local clientele (such as restaurants) can market effectively on social media…identifying and cultivating “superfans” who will advance your brand perhaps better than you can do on your own.

And it all comes from an attitude of service, perhaps best summed up by this quote from pages 193-194: “Always be thinking about how you can tap into the intelligent network of people that will allow you to bring greater value to each and every individual and your community at large. Provide a better product and better service, and consistently build your social equity to establish your brand as the natural “go-to” for your field. You can become a top industry leader by utilizing the inclusion of your marketplace. If you’re really treating people as equals–whether it’s 10 or 10 million–then you are relating to each one with the greatest of respect by including and involving them.”

The book is also crammed with resources, both in the main text and in the appendix, and features a wonderfully comprehensive index (something I desperately wish more business books paid attention to).

 

Some of the links in this newsletter earn me a commission. I only promote products that I think will be useful to you.

About Shel and this Newsletter

As a marketing consultant and copywriter … award-winning author of eight books… international speaker, blogger, syndicated columnist — Shel Horowitz shows how green and ethical businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green competitors. His most recent book is category bestseller Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet. Shel also helps authors/publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.

Shel began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way). Shel brings you a mix of actionable marketing tips, profiles of successful green and ethical businesses, and reviews of worthwhile books.

Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter, November 2011

In This Issue…

Clean and Green Spotlight: An Avon Approach To Healthier and Wealthier Communities

Guest article by Olivia Khalili of Cause Capitalism, where this originally appeared.

The concept is simple and brilliant. When I came across Living Goods, my stomach flipped with the potential impact of the organization’s work. The mechanisms, intent and appeal match that of blockbuster social enterprises Kiva and charity: water.

Living Goods replicates Avon’s model of door-to-door selling, but instead of peddling lipstick and mascara to middle-class women, Living Goods’ Health Promoters sell affordable health products—from antibacterial soap to de-worming tablets to condoms to bednets—to the Ugandan poor. By providing a way for women to make a living by selling products that prevent unnecessary death from treatable diseases, Living Goods is fighting the double-headed dragon of mortality and poverty.

More than 10 million children die every year (pause for a second; that’s 27,398 deaths a day) from easily treatable conditions like malaria, TB and diarrhoeal disease. Products for prevention and treatment exist, but efficient and scalable delivery systems are lacking. Living Goods uses micro-enterprise and micro-franchising to get these products into communities and to keep them there. Health Promoters buy a business-in-a-box for $100-$250, which includes the products, as well as training, marketing and coaching. Living Goods and its partners—one of whom is the microfinance and development organization BRAC—provide affordable financing for the kits.

Malaria, as one example, deals a double blow by causing economic as well as physical suffering. Reoccurring and prolonged bouts with malaria prevent people from working. Living Goods is committed to inverting this cycle by incentivizing its Health Promoters (through profit) to make essential health products available to more people. The more a Health Promoter does this, the larger her profit and the greater the health impact she will have on her community.

Over the next five years, Living Goods aims to become financially self-sustaining and to replicate its model in other countries. Charles Slaughter, Living Goods’ founder and president, is very open to helping other social enterprises adopt or replicate the model. Partnering with the Poverty Action Lab* (PAL), Living Goods is tracking its impact through randomized control studies as it works to lower mortality rates for children under five by 15-30% in its target communities.

Child and community health, female economic development, financial sustainability, open-source replication, local support, microfinance micro-enterprise—these outcomes and mechanisms give me an adrenaline jolt. Why have I not heard of Living Goods earlier? If you’re as moved by Living Goods’ approach and mission as I am, you can sign up for its e-newsletter or make a donation. Living Goods doesn’t yet have a Twitter or Facebook presence (but I’m about to offer to help develop it for them).

*The New Yorker recently wrote a great profile on PAL and the organization’s co-founder Esther Duflo.

Friends Who Want to Help

Amazing $2500 Freebie from Sean D’Souza of Psychotactics

Of the many marketers I regularly follow and learn from, I consider Sean D’Souza one of the smartest (as well among the most entertaining). If you’ve been reading my newsletter for a while, you might remember I’ve referred to him often, and have posted several of his articles to my various websites.

Well, now Sean is giving away a 36-audio course he normally charges $2500 for—if you register for his excellent newsletter—I’ve been reading it for many years—by November 29. Not only will you get what promises to be a ton of useful information, you’ll get to listen to Sean’s quirky and enjoyable Kiwi accent (he’s a New Zealander) as he delivers it. I’ve listened to a lot of his audios over the years, and I always learn a lot about human psychology—and how we marketers can most effectively harness it.

This workshop, the Brain Alchemy Masterclass, explains why structure—not marketing—is critical to growing a business effectively.

Because he’s including so much material, Sean is rationing out the access codes over time, so he doesn’t wipe out his servers with too many people trying to download at once. (I signed up and I’m waiting eagerly for my code.) Here’s the link: http://www.psychotactics.com/free-goodies

The Best-Conceived JV I’ve Seen

Do you do Joint Ventures? As I hinted last month, I’m helping to orchestrate a particularly exciting one, involving celebrities, politicians, environmental education, kids, quilts and all sorts of other cool stuff that appeals to the media and will get you coverage and contacts. We’re planning ahead on this-want to get commitments this year for ramping up early next year and a launch that ties in with Earth Day next spring-but don’t wait to get involved. If you’d like to receive an invitation as soon as we’re ready, please use this link to tell me (and let me know if you think of yourself as more of a marketer, or more of an environmentalist).

Unfamiliar with Joint Ventures? Basically, we partner with you, you tell your own contacts (like the readers of your e-zine or blog), and if people make purchases from your link, you earn a commission.

Guerrilla Marketing Intensive – $1000 discount just for you

My co-author, Jay Conrad Levinson, “the Father of Guerilla Marketing,” has a few seats left in his next Guerrilla Marketing Intensive, at his Florida home, January 23rd-25th. 21 hours of training over three days. Normally $4997 (payable in up to four installments)—but Jay’s manager (his daughter Amy) has offered a $1000 discount to my subscribers. Limited to just ten people, so this is pretty in-depth. https://gmarketing.infusionsoft.com/go/Int/shelhoro/ If you want my opinion about whether Jay knows his stuff, read my rave review elsewhere in this issue of Guerrilla Marketing Remix.

To get this special rate, just click this link: mailto:olympiagal@aol.com?subject=Discount?cc=shel@frugalfun.com to tell Amy you want the $1000 off for Shel’s subscribers (Also tell her whether you prefer an online payment link or prefer to call in your payment info).

Coop-themed Poetry Contest for Middle Schoolers

Know a middle-schooler who likes to write? Cheese and milk co-op Cabot is doing a poetry contest for students in grades 5-8, on the cooperative spirit. Winner not only gets a cash prize, but his or her poem on a Cabot butter box. For details: http://potatohill.com/files/2011-PoetryContest.pdf

Hear & Meet Shel

November

December:

January

Also remember—if you set me up an engagement, you could earn a generous commission.

Another Recommended Book: Guerrilla Marketing Remix

Another Recommended Book: Guerrilla Marketing Remix, by Jay Conrad Levinson and Jeannie Levinson (Entrepreneur Press)

I have read many of the Guerrilla Marketing books, and written one of them (Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green)—and I have to tell you this new “best of collection” is extremely impressive. It’s really two books in one, each of which is well worth reading (and taking notes on).

Through page 158, Jay and Jeannie’s summarize their key lessons after many years in the forefront of marketing innovation. And then in part two, they’ve culled some of the best wisdom from the numerous Guerrilla books co-authored with other experts.

The Levinsons have never been afraid to be heretics, and by page 15, they’re already very much against the grain. That’s where they tell us to beware of humor in advertising—because a key Guerrilla Marketing principle (as well as a core principle of traditional advertising) is repetition, but repeated humor gets old very quickly. By the third or fourth time, it starts to be annoying.

Other insights from part 1:

  • Patience and planning, rather than miracles, are key to success
  • A major purpose of a marketing funnel is to “broaden consent” and get buy-in for the next step
  • Honesty is rewarded; phoniness comes back to bite you (something I emphasize in several of my own books)
  • You get better customers when you motivate for positive gain rather than to avoid negatives such as hurt or fear
  • Go back to the well; 34 percent of your previous customers will likely try you again if you take the trouble to court them, with respect
  • Use clever strategies to drastically lower the cost of advertising, and maximize the leverage you get from it (such as the one on pages 93-94)
  • Never confuse revenue with profit

This whole section is rich in practical, actionable advice—much of it broken down into easy checklists, like the 200 top marketing weapons (really closer to 150, as several are restatements and variations), 5 overarching strategies, 50 reasons to advertise, and 35 advertising mistakes.

In fact, the advertising chapter is so jammed with wisdom that I would recommend to any of my marketing clients considering buying advertising that they read it, read it again three days later, and then again after a week. It’s that good.

And then there are the riches of part 2. With collaborators like Seth Godin, David Garfinkel, Laurel Langemeier, and Alex Mandossian, it’s not surprising to find many gems But don’t forget to read the folks who are not household names. Some of the best advice came from people you may never heard of, like Frank Adkins and Chris Forbes, who did Guerrilla Marketing for Nonprofits, or Orvel Ray Wilson and Mark S.A. Smith’s incredible tips from Guerrilla Negotiating. Many of these contributions are very strong as well.

Full disclosure: I am a contributor to this book, and I fully hope that the excerpt from Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green will encourage new readers t buy my book—just as I will be looking to acquire several of the other books this marvelous volume exposed me to.

Highly recommended.

 

Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter, October 2011

News Flash: I Was Inducted Into the National Environmental Hall of Fame

Read all about it and see a picture at http://greenandprofitable.com/i-was-inducted-into-the-national-environmental-hall-of-fame-today/ I hope to post a video next week, if the videographer sends me something I can use. Several dignitaries in attendance, too.

Contents of This Issue:

A Marketing Ploy that Cut Through the Clutter

UPS dropped off a surprise package from Random House recently; it looked like a box that would be used to ship a case of books.

When I opened the box, I saw a smaller, unmarked, white box, shrinkwrapped and floating on a cushion of air-filled plastic bags. I cut the shrinkwrap, opened the box, and took out a black slipcase, unadorned except for a line of headline type saying “GUESS THE YOUNGEST AGE EVER TARGETED BY A MARKETER.” Just below and to the right, these words in a starburst: “Be the first to know with this fascinating sneak-peek.”

The press kit inside the slipcase inside the box on top of the outer boxFinally, inside the slipcase, another, very deluxe box.  The front cover answered the question on the slipcase. When I opened it, the inside cover had four panels of marketing copy, contact information, *and* a video player containing three video trailers and a screen about the size of an iPhone’s. Needless to say, the graphics on the whole thing were extremely professional. The main part of the box contained two cutouts: one held an advance review copy of a new book, Brandwashed, by Martin Lindstrom, and the other held a small red plastic infant bottle whose label, extremely reminiscent of the famous Heinz catsup bottle, declared,

“WHINES EST’D 2011 BRAND WASHING YOU’RE NEVER TOO YOUNG”

The two enclosures were topped with a custom plastic tray that had a cut out for the bottle and fit snugly but comfortably into the box.

I remembered that Lindstrom had personally e-mailed me two weeks earlier, asking if I’d be interested in reviewing his forthcoming book. He’d written,

Like you, I have long been a proponent of environmental responsibility and have sought ways to encourage others to take a more active role in making and keeping our communities more “green”. That is why I think you should take a careful look at the multi-million dollar world-of-mouth marketing experiment that I had funded and chronicled in Brandwashed. I wanted to study just how persuasive word-of-mouth marketing could be as pertaining to household decisions, and in the latter stages focused specifically on environmentally conscious products and services. The results were shocking!

I’d been impressed at the time that he not only sought me out but that he spoke directly to my key interest area: the intersection of marketing with the environment.

As book reviewers go, I’m pretty low on the food chain. Typically, I do one review a month, in this newsletter (whose circulation figures don’t exactly set the world on fire)—and then the reviews get posted on Amazon about a month later. To receive such an intricate package despite my low status in the book review world was a recognition that somebody, in this case a best-selling author and top consultant in my field, values my opinion enough to be sure he gets noticed—and that’s flattering.

I had a number of reactions to receiving this package, and as a marketer/environmentalist who educates other marketers and environmentalists, I’d like to share some of them with you. The insights you might gain from a look into my psyche may help you as you design your next campaign.

  1. Undeniably, it was effective. As it happened, I hadn’t yet picked out a book to review this month, and with half the month gone, I needed to start. Martin’s book didn’t even stop at the top of the pile; it went directly to my exercise bike, where I read while working out, and I started reading it that very night (see my review elsewhere in this issue).
  2. To make that impression cost quite a bit of money. I’m guessing the package cost at least $50 per copy to design, prepare, and send. Am I enough of an influencer to be worth that investment? It would be nice to think so, but I don’t know.
  3. Obviously, the campaign is reaching people who do have a great deal of influence. On October 6, less than 10 days after publication, the book not only has 41 reviews on Amazon, but the #1 and #2 slots on three subcategories for marketing books and an enviable overall rank of 283. His earlier book, Buyology, is also doing quite well at the moment, probably with a little help from Amazon’s “people who bought also bought” trick.
  4. While the marketer in me is quite impressed, the environmentalist part of my brain is appalled. This was a very resource-intensive effort involving unrecyclable mixed materials and weighing seven pounds. In tiny print on the back of the player box, it notes that you’re not supposed to throw this out in the trash and should return the box to the video player company for processing. Not a lot of reviewers will even see that note, and fewer still will go through the trouble to find a suitable box, address a label, and pay for the postage to return it. Reviewers get dozens of packages per day, and many cases, get them pre-opened by a mailroom employee. The slipcase and the two outer boxes can be recycled with my other cardboard, but the rest of it is problematic. This is especially ironic, given Lindstrom’s personal message to me.
  5. After experiencing this elaborate and expensive press kit, I am surprised by the book cover, which in my opinion is both unattractive and unimaginative. If a client came to me with this cover, I’d have advised a different concept.
  6. Targeting is key. This book was well-targeted to me, and Lindstrom’s personal message was even more targeted. Had I received a similar press kit for, let’s say, a book about Britney Spears’ hairstyle shenaningans, I would have been annoyed instead of intrigued, and the whole thing would have gone into the recycle bin without a second look.

How would you react if you received a package like this? Click on this link to tell me, or to make any other comments. Please tell me if I have permission to publish your comment publicly. I’m thinking of gathering the responses into a blog post (which is also an easy way for you to get a link from my site—just include your URL in the e-mail).

 

Friends Who Want to Help

The Best-Conceived JV I’ve Seen

Do you do Joint Ventures? As I hinted last month, I’m helping to orchestrate a particularly exciting one, involving celebrities, politicians, environmental education, kids, quilts and all sorts of other cool stuff that appeals to the media and will get you coverage and contacts. We’re planning ahead on this–want to get commitments this year for ramping up early next year and a launch that ties in with Earth Day next spring–but don’t wait to get involved. If you’d like to receive an invitation as soon as we’re ready, please use this link to tell me (and let me know if you think of yourself as more of a marketer, or more of an environmentalist).

Unfamiliar with Joint Ventures? Basically, we partner with you, you tell your own contacts (like the readers of your e-zine or blog), and if people make purchases from your link, you earn a commission.

30-minute No-Cost Consultation with Scott Cooney from Green Business Owner, and a Cool-Looking Sustainability Game, Too

Scott gave me one of these consultations, and I very much appreciated his fresh perspective. He’s also just developed a very spiffy-looking game on sustainability themes, set in Hawaiii. To get your consult, visit GreenBusinessOwner.com, and then click on the Consulting link on the top menu. For the game, go directly to this link.

Two Book-Publishing Conferences:

D’vorah Lansky’s Online Book Marketing Conference

Check out the amazing speaker line-up for the 3rd Annual Book Marketing Conference Online–I now almost all of them and can vouch for their good work. And this one has a series of free preview calls, too.

* Kathleen Gage: “Become an Online Bestselling Author in Today’s Crowded Author’s Market”
* Carolyn Howard-Johnson: “Your Awards: How to win them and then use them to set your book apart”
* Brian Jud: “Selling More Books, More Profitably to Non-Bookstore Buyers”
* Lynne Klippel: “Going Beyond the Book: Fast, Easy Product Creation for Authors”
* Jill Lublin: “Be the News”
* Connie Ragen Green: “How to Repurpose Your Existing Content to Become a Bestselling Author”
* Marnie Pehrson: “Using Social Media to Create a Buzz About Your Book”
* Penny Sansevieri: “Maximize and Monetize Social Media -3rd Annual Book Marketing Conference”
* Felicia J. Slattery: “How Authors Can Create a Signature Speech to Build Platform and Sell More Books”
* Dana Lynn Smith: “The Secrets to Planning a Profitable Virtual Book Tour”
* Steven E. Schmitt: “How I made millions by listening to my intuitive voice”
* Noah St. John: “Attract More Money Blueprint: Your Hidden Power for More Wealth and Happiness”
* Denise Wakeman: “The Secret to Author Blog Success: How to Dominate Your Niche with a Book Blog”

Get the details at: http://www.bookmarketingmadeeasy.com/center/idevaffiliate.php?id=139

Publishing Conference in Nevada Next Month

This is taken directly from a press release I received: PubWest, the leading trade association for small- and medium-sized book publishers, is pleased to announce the full agenda for the PubWest Conference 2011 in November. The programming includes notable keynotes by Len Riggio, Chairman of Barnes & Noble; Tyson Cornell of Rare Bird Lit; and Kevin Smokler, author of the forthcoming essay collection Practical Classics. Sessions include intensives on Digital Publishing and Creating EPUBS with Adobe InDesign CS5.5, Exploration and Discussion of the Chicago Manual of Style’s New 16th Edition with Alice Levine, Evaluating the Effectiveness of Social Marketing, Optimizing Digital Production Workflows, Improving Your Publishing Company’s Profitability, Product Line Branding and Permissions, “Green” Publishing, Faceoff between Traditional and New Social Media, Enhanced E-Books, Metadata and Discoverability, plus lively and interactive roundtables held by professionals in the industry.

Registration: www.pubwest.org/conference. More info: kent@pubwest.org

The Living Organization

Tough times call for better ideas – Packed with powerful insights, tools, and practices, this book is a potent resource for aspiring, emerging, and seasoned business leaders alike. Norman Wolfe reframes and broadens our understanding of how organizations can create better results. Every leader, every CEO, board member and senior executive will benefit from the practical guidance this book provides. The Living Organization – check it out: http://bit.ly/puW6nt

Hear & Meet Shel

October

  • Speaking at Bioneers-By-The-Bay, wonderful conference October 21-23 in New Bedford, MA, http://www.marioninstitute.org/connecting-for-change My talk is Sunday October 23: signing books at 12:30-1 p.m. at Bakers Books tables inside the Butterfly Exhibition Tent, then presenting Getting Buy-In: Building Stakeholder Consensus for Sustainability, at Bristol Community College, 800 Purchase St., Conference Room. Note: this is the very first time I’m giving this talk, aimed at activists, government leaders, and green business owners. Lots of good nitty-gritty stuff about how to analyze and reach your market.
  • October 28 and beyond, my interview on Good And Green Radio will be available at http://wgrnradio.com/archive-good-and-green-radio-with-susan-davis/
November
  • I’ll be walking the floor in the afternoon at the Green Expo Opportunity Fair in Springfield, MA, at the MassMutual Center. Let me know ahead if you’d like to meet there.
  • November 15, 8:00 pm ET/5 pm PT, January Jones interviews me: 818-431-8506
  • November 16, 7 pm ET/4 pm PT: Interviewed on Your15Minutes Radio’s “Brand This” with Shaun Walker and Reid Stone, www.your15minutesradio.com
  • November 17, 11 a.m. ET/8 am PT: Interviewed by Susan Rich on “Get Noticed Now.”
January
Remember-if you set me up an engagement, you could earn a generous commission.

Another Recommended Book: Brandwashed

Brandwashed: Tricks Companies Use to Manipulate Our Minds and Persuade Us to Buy, by Martin Lindstrom (Crown, division of Random House, 2011)

Both as a marketer and as a consumer, you want to understand the psychology of modern-day marketing (and especially the particular marketing subset called advertising). Without a clear picture of just how deeply manipulated we are, at a level not even dreamed of when Vance Packard wrote The Hidden Persuaders back in the 1950s, you will be defenseless against the continual assault on your wallet.

Martin Lindstrom, an industry insider who has helped big brands go deep into their consumers’ minds and come out the other end with fistfuls of money, turns his attention to explaining how these companies get inside your brains, and what they do once they get there.

While he certainly pays attention to the traditional buy triggers, like fear, sex, celebrity, spirituality, fear, and nostalgia—each of which gets its own chapter—the real news in this book is the evolution of companies’ knowledge about us, and how they manipulate every aspect of your “buyer experience,” through a huge range of tools, to create the desired effect: a ravenous, insatiable hunger for the company’s brand.

This well-written and well-researched book should give anyone pause. But perhaps the scariest part is how early it starts. Marketers have known for many years that buying habits and brand loyalties acquired in childhood can shape lifelong preferences. That’s why, for instance, computer companies value the elementary education market so highly.

But it starts much earlier than that. Literally, the music you hear, the smells you experience in the womb can influence your choices all through life. And peer pressure has been documented at 14 months old.

The positive side of this is that these sensual memories can help with things like stroke recovery. But the Big Brotherish part of it is disturbing. Add in such factors as the deliberate manipulation of fear to literally make us stupid and not only do you have a commercial marketer’s paradise, but also (here I’m extrapolating from Lindstrom) the easy ability to whip up patriotic fervor to justify evil actions by governments (think about the manufacture of anti-Jewish sentiment during the Holocaust, or anti-Muslim sentiment in the US following 9/11, with the media cheering on the crackdown in both cases).

Another key insight: when we encounter arousing images, we perceive ourselves as sexier. (This is what psychologists call “transference.”) No wonder so much of advertising features sultry women and hunky men. And according to his research, straight men are a major, if hidden, market that responds to those pictures of hunky men. Also, the male who is conscious of his own beauty and spends lavishly on personal care products/services is a hot new trend.

Celebrity marketing is related to this; we perceive ourselves as increasing our status and power when we read and watch those with high status and power—they are our idealized future selves. Celebs (including various royal families) feed into this and deliberately manage their personal brands very carefully.

Concerned about privacy? Basically, it no longer exists. Data mining is far more sophisticated now, and companies can create incredibly detailed profiles not just segment-by-segment, but person-by-person. They know who you are, what you wear, what you eat, where you work, where you are (if you use a cell phone), and how long you’ve spent on which web pages. Not only do we voluntarily reveal enormous amounts of information about ourselves to companies like Facebook and Google (and some companies have learned how to subvert the privacy safeguards and harvest this), but there’s plenty of data collection going on without our consent, too. And data mining companies sometimes require their customers to provide more data if they want the service.

But wait! There’s more!

  • Some products, notably in the cosmetics industry, do the opposite of what they promise, thus feeding more purchases because the wearer thinks, “I must not have put enough on.”
  • 60 percent of teens think they can buy their way to happiness with the right brands (and many of them will outright reject unbranded items)
  • While brands are seen as a path to self-esteem, knowingly buying a counterfeit lowers self-esteem
  • Nostalgia marketing has hooks back to our earliest childhood; we long for simpler times before we had grown up worries, and will welcome even products we ignored at the time
  • GPS-like devices on shopping carts allow stores to track individual movement patterns in the store—while digital price signage allows companies to actually change prices to reflect trends at different times of day
  • Receiving advice that seems to be expert shuts down our critical thinking, even if the expertise is weak or is really celebrity in disguise)—and word-of-mouth from a trusted friend or colleague *definitely* counts heavily

Lindstrom ends the book with a complex experiment he set up, giving a real family a mission to influence the buying habits of their friends.  The results are shocking; go read the book to learn what happened, and to learn many more startling tidbits than I had room to describe. (See, now I just implanted a suggestion to you. I’m not being paid in any way to recommend this book and am not using my Amazon affiliate code. But I’d love to see whether my self-perception as a trusted expert translates into sales that bear out Lindstrom’s hypothesis, despite my transparency about it —so if you buy the book on my say-so, please drop me a note: mailto:shel@frugalfun.com?subject=IBoughtBrandwashed .) Please tell me if I have permission to publish your comment publicly. I’m thinking of gathering the responses into a blog post (which is also an easy way for you to get a link from my site—just include your URL in the e-mail).

Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter, September 2011

 

In This Issue…

9/11 and the Lost Opportunity

I have spent much time over the last 10 years reflecting on 9/11, the choices that were made at that time, and the dreadful consequences of those choices: hundreds of thousands dead, two countries largely destroyed, and the economy of a third–my own country–in shambles. I took the 10th anniversary as a day to think about what might have been, how President Bush (and the country) could have seized the moment and stepped into greatness. I’d welcome your comments on the blog page at http://greenandprofitable.com/911-bushs-lost-opportunity-for-world-peace/

And yes, I recognize that not everyone reading this will share my opinions. Honest disagreement and healthy discussion are good things (ad hominum attacks are not).

Direct Mail that Got Me to Write Back

Bonus Direct-Mail Tip:

Since my subject is effective direct mail…

If you use an e-mail program like Constant Contact that supposedly renders beautiful HTML, make darned sure your “view in a browser” link actually works. Those renderings are unreadable in my e-mail program, though beautiful on the web. If the link to the web version doesn’t work—and that happens at least 15 percent of the time—I hit delete, and all your hard work adding me to your list is lost.

A Bulk E-Mail That Worked For Me

As a marketing consultant, copywriter, and teacher of effective marketing, I’m always on the lookout for great examples.

This is a cold-pitch that showed up in my e-mail recently, and I thought it was so brilliantly done, I asked permission to share it. And we’re actually even in dialogue about his core services. If we can find something that’s appropriate for me to use at personal appearances, I might even become a customer—and the last time I bought promotional products was something like 1988.

Wish I could take the credit for it—but I’m guessing Josh didn’t even use a copywriter, just wrote from his heart. Here’s the letter, and then some analysis; feel free to add your own comments below:

From: "Josh Frey" <joshfrey@onsalepromos.com>
Subject: Just Checking In Shel ...
X-Pass-two: yes

Hi Shel!

Hope you and yours had a great Labor Day weekend!  I was was up in NYC celebrating my
Aunt and Uncle's 60th anniversary (I know, that's a pretty impressive number of years
to be married!).

Anyway, I just wanted to check-in to see if you had any upcoming needs for September
and the Fall...for trade shows, events, corporate outings, recruiting fairs, etc?  

Our team would be happy to research and price out some ideas and items for you or any
of your colleagues at Principled Profit if you all have any needs.

Thanks for the opportunity and let me know if we can be of service.  Have a great week.

Josh

P.S. Here is a link to an awesome deal on Starbucks style 16oz. Acrylic Tumblers -
BUY 96 GET 96 FREE!  Only $6.50 per tumbler.  For more details, click here:

http://trk.cp20.com/Tracking/t.c?NH0e-LHqe-pJtXA6

P.P.S. This tumbler deal is over 75% off of what Starbucks charges!  You can buy these
on Amazon for 22 ea... or with us for $6.50.  Plus, you get your logo on the tumbler.
Don't believe me...check it out:

http://trk.cp20.com/Tracking/t.c?NH0e-LHqf-pJtXA7

Josh Frey
CEO and Founder, On Sale Promos
202-237-2828 cell
joshfrey@onsalepromos.com
5100A Macarthur Blvd, NW
Washington, District of Columbia 20016
United States

You are subscribed to this newsletter as shel@principledprofit.com. Please use the link
below to modify your message preferences or to unsubscribe from any future mailings.
We will respect all unsubscribe requests.

http://trk.cp20.com/Tracking/t.fo?NH0e--i1g-pJtXA6&sl=1v

powered by Campaigner

What I Liked:

  • It’s just so darned friendly and personable, starting with a tidbit about his family and ending in the same casual way by wishing me a great week. My immediate reaction: do I actually know this person after all? (Answer: not as far as I know, and frankly, that could have backfired—but for me, it actually worked—maybe in part because I do know two people with the same last name, including a client)
  • It’s helpful: he’s checking on my needs and showing a willingness to do preliminary work on my behalf, without any commitment from me to buy.
  • It’s inclusive: he invites me to think about my colleagues.
  • It’s short!
  • It’s specific; not only does he name four types of events for which he can supply product and a specific period of time, but he gives me a sample deal to check out.
  • Plus he gives me the Amazon link to price-compare, where I can see that he is much, much cheaper than a site known for price-leadership.
  • He mail-merges my name appropriately and not to excess—just the subject line and salutation.
  • He includes full contact, including a cell phone—nice touch

What I Didn’t Like:

  • As far as I know, I never subscribed to his newsletter. Adding without permission is not only annoying, it’s actually illegal. Now, maybe I was wrong and did sign up; if so, he might have included a merge field that told me when and how I agreed to receive it. If I didn’t, though, a more appropriate method would be to say this is a one-time mailing and offer me the option to subscribe: a positive opt-in rather than a negative opt-out.  [Following up, I found out he took my card at a conference.]
  • The subject line, though effective in getting me to open the mail, was annoyingly unspecific. Because my name was merged in, I did open it. Without the merged name, I probably would have deleted. But I have no idea from the subject about the content of the e-mail. Of course, if it had said he was trying to sell me promotional mugs, I would have deleted too. Getting the subject line right is an art and the subject of much discussion among copywriters.
  • I always get a little ruffled when people take liberties with punctuation (okay, so I’m old-fashioned!). He needs commas before my name in both places.

What did YOU think of Josh’s approach?

Another Recommended Book: Outliers, by Malcolm Gladwell

Outliers: The Story of Success, by Malcolm Gladwell (Little, Brown & Co., 2008)

The best-selling author of The Tipping Point and Blink claims in this book that success is made as well as born, and that rare indeed is the person who succeeds without considerable support and resources from others. “Outliers are those who have been given opportunities–and who have had the strength and presence of mind to seize them,” he states on page 267.

He points to super-successful overachievers in a wide range of fields, from star Canadian hockey players to computer genius entrepreneurs Bill Gates of Microsoft and Bill Joy of Sun Microsystems, and shows how their success is directly related to specific (differing) factors in their upbringing, their environment, the accident of when, where, and to whom they were born. And he ends by tracking his own family history, and showing how the choices of previous generations helped him become the person he is.

A key observation is that sufficient practice and menteeship maeks a difference, and that those who are given opportunities to log in 10,000 hours in their field–from the Beatles playing 8-hour sets as a fledgling band in Hamburg to New York’s Jewish lawyers of a certain generation pretty much inventing the field of corporate takeovers because they were denied jobs by the genteel Protestant firms of the time and had to go where the “white glove” lawyers would not.

Perhaps the best poster-boy for his argument is Chris Langan, a certified genius with an IQ of 195, but a person who, according to Gladwell, was severely hindered by a distinctly wrong-side-of-the-tracks upbringing that neither acknowledged nor nurtured his gifts—leaving him with very limited social skills and poor adaptive mechanisms. Langan not only does not appear to strive for (or achieve) material success or even intellectual accomplishment, he actually crashed against the bureaucracy early on and dropped out of college. Gladwell contrasts him with the career of atomic scientist J. Robert Oppenheimer, and shows how Oppenheimer’s background gave him the street smarts to talk his way out of far more incriminating troubles, and to achieve success on his own terms, while Langan could not overcome the handicap of growing up in an anti-intellectual beer-and-television culture.

Similarly, Gladwell demonstrates that ghetto kids often actually test better for in-class learning than kids from higher up the class ladder (maybe because they have a bigger mountain to climb)–but the gains they make in class aren’t sufficient to make up for their stagnation while kids raised in an atmosphere of “concerted cultivation” continue their learning after school and during vacations, immersing themselves in books, travel, the arts, and other opportunities.

The encouraging factors can be socioeconomic, but also ethnic, chronological, or coincidental. Gladwell look at why the Chinese language and a society b ased on rice cultivation propel success in math…why Korean pilots’ accident rates improved dramatically when they were retrained to overcome a cultural bias toward authority, and why American planes are safer when the First Officer, and not the captain, is at the controls…why month of birth makes a huge difference in your chance of success as a hockey player in Canada.

Gladwell did not write the book as an academic exercise; he wants us, as a society, to stop squandering our children’s gifts and to make sure that we have systems in place to encourage everyone to explore their creativity, harness their gifts, and make a difference in the world:

Our world only allowed one thirteen-year-old unlimited access to a time-sharing terminal in 1968. If a million teenagers had been given the same opportunity, how many more Microsofts would we have today? To build a better word we need to replace the patchwork of lucky breaks and arbitrary advantages that today determine success–the fortunate birth dates and the happy accidents of history–with a society that provides opportunities for all…Multiply that sudden flowering of talent by very field and profession. The world could be so much richer than the world we have settled for.

Shel Horowitz’s latest book is the award-winning and category best-selling Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet (co-authored with Jay Conrad Levinson)

Hear & Meet Shel

September

October

November

  • November 15, 8:00 pm ET/5 pm PT, January Jones interviews me: 818-431-8506

Remember–if you set me up an engagement, you could earn a generous commission.

Friends Who Want to Help

Watch this Space for Something Really Exciting

They are *almost* ready to give out the details, so expect a special mailing: an invitation to a very exciting JV (Joint Venture) that has the potential to bring messages of easy environmental sustainability to a whole lot of people that haven’t “gotten it” before. Several A-list celebrities have lent their names to the project, which will have a whole lot of media attention nationwide. And there could be some very nice commissions for you, as well.

Private Teleseminar for My Readers:

How to Make Money with Membership Programs with Kathleen Gage

You’d pay quite a bit to get teaching of this quality, but for you–no charge. Allow at least two hours, because Kathleen is going to share a LOT of information. (And yes, she’s hoping you decide to buy her longer, deeper program). But even while co-hosting, I intend to take notes. I’ve tried a couple of different membership program launches that haven’t taken off, and I’m hoping Kathleen will shine some light on what I need to do different. She’s done a gazillion and has done very well with them.

Mark your calendar now:

Monday, October 17th, 10am PT / 1pm ET

And remember to check next month’s newsletter for the registration link.

Check out the amazing speaker line-up for the 3rd Annual Book Marketing Conference Online

* Kathleen Gage: “Become an Online Bestselling Author in Today’s Crowded Author’s Market”
* Carolyn Howard-Johnson: “Your Awards: How to win them and then use them to set your book apart”
* Brian Jud: “Selling More Books, More Profitably to Non-Bookstore Buyers”
* Lynne Klippel: “Going Beyond the Book: Fast, Easy Product Creation for Authors”
* Jill Lublin: “Be the News”
* Connie Ragen Green: “How to Repurpose Your Existing Content to Become a Bestselling Author”
* Marnie Pehrson: “Using Social Media to Create a Buzz About Your Book”
* Penny Sansevieri: “Maximize and Monetize Social Media -3rd Annual Book Marketing Conference”
* Felicia J. Slattery: “How Authors Can Create a Signature Speech™ to Build Platform and Sell More Books”
* Dana Lynn Smith: “The Secrets to Planning a Profitable Virtual Book Tour”
* Steven E. Schmitt: “How I made millions by listening to my intuitive voice”
* Noah St. John: “Attract More Money Blueprint: Your Hidden Power for More Wealth and Happiness”
* Denise Wakeman: “The Secret to Author Blog Success: How to Dominate Your Niche with a Book Blog”

Get the details at: http://shelhorowitz.com/go/bookmarketing/

Up close and personal with my celebrated co-author, Jay Conrad Levinson, Father of Guerrilla Marketing

Jay is having one of his famous intimate 21-hour intensives at his lovely Florida home, September 26-28. Only 10 people will be allowed in. http://3bl.me/ysqdva . Jay describes it as “a three-day face-to-face training personally conducted by me in our home here on a lake just northeast of Orlando, Florida. It’s intense because it’s from noon till 7 pm three days in a row – 21 hours with lots of hands-on, devoted to making you a true guerrilla marketer.”

Some of these links are affiliate programs and earn me a commission. All of them are things I feel good about recommending.

 

Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter, August 2011

 

In This Issue…

Can You Help Me Out (and Get Paid?)

I find myself looking for a few different types of people to work as part-time independent contractors. You can pick up some income, working from the comfort of your own computer and telephone, while helping to spread the message that green and ethical behavior is not only the right thing morally, but also a great way to grow your business.

* Webmaster: Format and post content, administer newsletters, revise content as necessary, research and install/troubleshoot new tools and scripts. Note: most of our sites are now in WordPress, which makes changing appearance or content very easy. But some of our older sites-the ones with the most articles-are in old-fashioned HTML, so some basic familiarity is necessary. This will probably take about five hours a week. USD $10/hour.

* Speech Booker: Commissioned sales: 25% of the speaking fee (my standard rate is $5000 for a 60- to 90-minute speech, plus noncommissionable travel expenses).

* Other Commissioned Sales: Sell my monthly Green And Profitable and Green And Practical columns to corporate and media clients. Sell my membership program. Sell foreign rights for books and information products. Commissions vary depending on the product.

Contact me to learn more: shel at greenandprofitable.com, or (8 a.m. to 10 p.m. US Eastern) 413-586-2388.

Not Just USP… ESP

If you’ve been in marketing any length of time, you’ve no doubt come across the concept of a USP: Unique Selling Proposition. A USP is the core reason why people would choose you rather than someone else; the classic example is Domino’s Pizza: fresh hot pizza, delivered to your door in 30 minutes or less. It’s not about the flavor or the quality, but about the speed and convenience.

Another well-known example, and I like this one because it’s not only a USP but also a memorable slogan, is FedEx’s 1978-83 slogan, “When it Absolutely, Positively has to be there overnight.” Its staying power is clear; I still remember it 28 years after the company stopped running those ads. Why did they abandon it, anyway?

In the green world, USPs might emphasize product attributes (e.g., organic and fair trade, biodegradable, recycled, low energy), longevity in the green market (such as Marcal’s “saving trees since 1950″), and/or manufacturing frameworks such as carbon-neutral, zero waste, etc. And in the green market, the more of these claims you can honestly make, the better your reception will be—but it has to be done in a way that’s not clunky or cumbersome. (If this is something you struggle with my book, Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green will help, and I’m also available for private consulting.)

However, we can go a lot deeper. Paul John Castle, a fellow member of the LinkedIn Green discussion group, introduced me to Grant Leboff’s concept of an Emotional Selling Point, which he describes in his book Sticky Marketing.

We already know that people buy based on emotions and justify with rational arguments. I think this ESP concept could have a lot of resonance. See, for example, this blogger writing about what a stuffed giraffe meant to his pregnant wife. Here’s an article by Paul Simister on ESPs, which gives a nice clear explanation and is a good place to begin your exploration.

Another Recommended Book

Another Recommended Book: Ethical Marketing and the New Consumer, by Chris Arnold (John Wiley and Sons UK, 2009)

From the perspective of an ad agency creative marketer who has worked with some very big brands, Chris Arnold reaches many of the same conclusions I do in Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green (also published by Wiley, but in the US, and a year later): that ethical and green positioning is good for business, but that these businesses have to understand what they’re doing, what they’re saying, and to whom. AND that given products of comparable price and quality, customers will buy the one with social impact claims. In other words, when price and quality are equal, the ethical brands win.

Customers have zero tolerance for greenwashing these days–so making false claims, claims with a grain of truth but no substance, or claims that are at odds with other facets of your company’s operation–like the bank he criticizes for running ads for a “green” loan program featuring gas-guzzling SUVs–simply don’t make any marketing sense. He offers oodles of good examples.

Arnold’s book is partly organized by industry, so there are chapters for food packaging, food nutrition, clothing, cleaning products, and even insurance. Who knew there was such a thing as a green insurance agency? These chapters are scattered among other chapters devoted to marketing skills, trends and philosophies, and chapters focused on ethics ideas (ranging from fair trade to the influence of Quakers and Puritans on the corporate landscape). Some of the skills-oriented chapters have very good material, like his process for identifying a company’s strongest green and ethical talking points and building a campaign around them. And his advice to the UK fashion discounter Primark on how to build an ethical profile (p. 224) is worth getting the book just for that.

He is frank in discussing the need for green and ethical brands to perform as well or better than traditional brands. As someone who bought some early, primitive, and not-very functional biodegradable diapers when they first came out around 1989 or 1990, I can tell you from personal experience that customers demand quality: when we buy green, we DO want cleansers that clean, food that tastes great, clothes that look great and are comfortable to wear, and yes, diapers that can be relied on to hold in the mess. I did not go back for a second package of those diapers!

Fortunately, green products have come a long way since then–something that Arnold doesn’t always recognize. He sees many green products still under the stigma of poor quality. I personally think that food, in particular, usually looks, smells, and especially tastes better when it’s organic and local and fresh, that natural body care products feel better on the skin, and that green home products tend to increase comfort.

Arnold’s best strength is his creativity, boldness, and sense of play. He describes some absolutely wonderful campaigns, including a publicity stunt involving putting a 21-foot condom on a statue as part of a college safe-practices awareness campaign. Humor, he says, not only sells product, but also helps convey potentially depressing ideas very effectively. And that bridges to a long and useful discussion about using emotions and even NLP (Neurolinguistic Programming) techniques to capture the prospect as not only a thinking, but also a feeling individual. He asks: are your ads good enough that people would pay to see them?

The best news in his book may be the sense of opportunity in the green market as it begins to go mainstream. He says half of all Americans would go greener if they knew how–so we, as green marketers, get to show them! How cool is that? He also posits that a bold campaign reaching a small group of influencers may be a better (and more affordable) strategy than a big but bland campaign aimed at the general public. He wants to show the public, through the people they want to emulate, that ethical buying and ethical product use are revolutionary steps in the best sense of the word, and that thrills me.

I do have to temper my endorsement, though. First, the book is very UK-centric and somewhat less accessible to readers elsewhere. Of the five companies mentioned most often (sometimes positively, sometimes negatively), four of them–Marks & Spencer (which he calls M&S), Sainsbury, Tesco, and Primark are largely unknown in the US. The fifth is McDonald’s, which comes under sharp examination around obesity and other issues. People in the green world know M&S’s Plan A sustainability drive, and maybe people in retail foods have heard of the supermarket giant Tesco–but probably not the others. In fact, the vast majority of his examples are UK-centric. His language, also, is a bit off-putting, full of British slang and lacking punctuation that those of us in the US feel increases readability. And second, even though it’s published by a major house, the book is sloppy. The writing is disorganized and repetitive, and the copy-editing was perfunctory, leaving glaring inconsistencies, misspellings, and an occasional obvious blooper (like 63 instead of 66 years between the 1903 Wright Brothers flight and the 1969 moon landing).

Despite those flaws, I strongly recommend the book.

Get your copy here: Ethical Marketing and The New Consumer

Hear & Meet Shel

Replay:

September

October

Negotiating on several other speaking engagements. Remember-if you set me up an engagement, you could earn a generous commission.

Friends Who Want to Help

Watch this Space for Something Really Exciting

Not at liberty to give out the details, but as a subscriber, you’ll be getting an invitation to a very exciting JV (Joint Venture) that has the potential to bring messages of easy environmental sustainability to a whole lot of people that haven’t “gotten it” before. Several A-list celebrities have lent their names to the project, which will have a whole lot of media attention nationwide. And there could be some very nice commissions for you, as well.

Up close and personal with my celebrated co-author, Jay Conrad Levinson, Father of Guerrilla Marketing

Jay is having one of his famous intimate 21-hour intensives at his lovely Florida home, September 26-28. Only 10 people will be allowed in.  http://3bl.me/ysqdva . Jay describes it as “a three-day face-to-face training personally conducted by me in our home here on a lake just northeast of Orlando, Florida. It’s intense because it’s from noon till 7 pm three days in a row — 21 hours with lots of hands-on, devoted to making you a true guerrilla marketer.”

Want to create more business on LinkedIn?

This series of templates and guides will help you beef up your profile, have a more authoritative presence in discussion forums, and generally make it more likely to actually do business. In fact, while I was reviewing this material, I stopped what I was doing twice–once to change my profile headline, and once to make some changes in the way my Green And Ethical Business group is set up–and I’m not exactly a LinkedIn newbie (in fact, I was member #150225 out of more than 100,000,000). www.InstantLinkedInMarketingTemplates.com/shel

Did You Know There Are 156 Ways to Wash The Dishes?

That’s right and, more importantly, there are just as many ways to use social media.   There is no “right” way to use social media, nor is there only one way to succeed at it.  That’s why my colleagues have put together “Social Media Connect,” a collection of ideas and strategies, gleaned from some of the top people in Internet marketing and social media, including yours truly.

This is one resource you won’t want to miss out on.  And, remember to grab your bonus copy of “Blogging 4 Cash” as their thank you for joining: http://shelhorowitz.com/go/socialmediaconnect/

 

Some of these links are affiliate programs and earn me a commission. All of them are things I feel good about recommending.

Shel Horowitz’s Clean & Green Newsletter, July 2011

There were some delivery problems with last month’s issue, so some information is repeated here. the main articles, however, are new, as are several of the items in other sections.

In This Issue…

  • Can You Help Me Out (and Get Paid?)
  • Special Price On Shel’s Award-Winning Book
  • Do You Qualify for a No-Cost Consultation with Shel?
  • How to Get Media Coverage From Reporter Query Sites
  • Another Recommended Book: Elizabeth & Hazel
  • Hear & Meet Shel
  • Friends Who Want to Help

(Some of the links in this newsletter are affiliate links-if you want to know about any particular link, please ask.)

Can You Help Me Out (and Get Paid?)

I find myself looking for a few different types of people to work as part-time independent contractors. You can pick up some income, working from the comfort of your own computer and telephone, while helping to spread the message that green and ethical behavior is not only the right thing morally, but also a great way to grow your business.

* Webmaster: Format and post content, administer newsletters, revise content as necessary, research and install/troubleshoot new tools and scripts. Note: most of our sites are now in WordPress, which makes changing appearance or content very easy. But some of our older sites–the ones with the most articles–are in old-fashioned HTML, so some basic familiarity is necessary. This will probably take about five hours a week. USD $10/hour.

* Speech Booker: Commissioned sales: 25% of the speaking fee (my standard rate is $5000 for a 60- to 90-minute speech, plus noncommissionable travel expenses).

* Other Commissioned Sales: Sell my monthly Green And Profitable and Green And Practical columns to corporate and media

clients. Sell my membership program. Sell foreign rights for books and information products. Commissions vary depending on the product.

Contact me to learn more: shel at greenandprofitable.com, or (8 a.m. to 10 p.m. US Eastern) 413-586-2388.

Special Price on Shel’s Award-Winning Book, Grassroots Marketing: Getting Noticed in a Noisy World

This Foreword Magazine Book of the Year Award finalist is a one-stop guide to low-cost, high-ROI marketing methods. Detailed coverage of copywriting, design, marketing online, selling in person, expertise-based marketing, and much more–plus a supplemental e-book that covers social media marketing in detail Please visit http://www.frugalmarketing.com/gm.shtml to see the complete table of contents and index, reader and press reviews, and more. It’s a very solid 306-page 7 x 10 book with lots of examples and visuals. Big, yes–but also easy to read, easy to grasp, and easy to implement. A great way to jump-start your marketing.

List price is $22.95–but right now, you can grab a copy for just $12.00 plus shipping (that’s the same price my publisher charged for a smaller and less comprehensive book I wrote many years earlier, and a savings of better than 47 percent.

And if you want to train your whole team, pay just $10 per book if you three or more, or $8 each if you buy ten or more. What a deal!

To order, visit http://www.frugalmarketing.com/cart/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=65&products_id=180 and enter the code for the quantity you want:

single copies at $12 each: GM12

3 to 9 copies at $10 each: GM10

10 or more copies at $8 each: GM8

Do You Qualify for a No-Cost Consultation with Shel?

I am giving away four 15-minute consultations this month on any aspect of marketing, book publishing, or green business. They will go to the first four people to respond with appropriate answers to the brief five-question survey at http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/9R5TYLC

How to Get Media Coverage from Reporter Query Sites

Last month, I showed you six places where reporters go to actively find the perfect sources for stories they’re working on (or producers looking for guests). Now, learn how to get the most value out of the contacts you initiate.

• Respond as instantly as possible (except for Radio GuestList—in most cases, they have an ongoing need, and you’ll stand out more by waiting until the deluge dies down). These queries may draw 200 responses, so the fastest in get the closest consideration. Consider setting up a separate e-mail address to receive and respond to queries, and check that account every hour from 6 a.m. to 6 pm. US Eastern Time (or better yet, turning on audio notification just for that account).
• Stay on topic and relevant—don’t try to make a fit where one doesn’t really exist. That means paying attention to such factors as geographic needs, size of company, or anything else the reporter might specify in the query (yeah, it would be nice if more reporters put the restrictions in the headline).
• Give the reporter something to quote right in your query (I usually do between 2-5 bullet points or one very meaty paragraph).
• Mention your relevant credentials.
• Set up Google and Yahoo Alerts for your name, book title, and perhaps main topic keywords (if not too general), so you can see if you get quoted—reporters won’t always tell you.

Another Recommended Book: Elizabeth and Hazel

Another Recommended Book: Elizabeth and Hazel: Two Women of Little Rock, by David Margolick (Yale University Press, forthcoming September, 2011).

Although this is not a business book, it has deep implications for business—and especially for those businesses trying to rehabilitate their image after a history of polluting, unfair labor practices, or other unethical behavior. For every Walmart that successfully pulls itself out of the pit, there are many BPs whose efforts at going clean turn out to be nothing but greenwashing. And managers at those sorts of companies may well want to spend a couple of hours with this book.

Elizabeth and Hazel starts at a very ugly moment in American history: a white girl (Hazel) is captured mid-scream as she curses Elizabeth, the unbowed black girl in front of her, one of nine students chosen to integrate Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas, on her first day of school, in 1957—when both girls are just 15. The book follows these two women, separately and together, for more than 50 years. And it explores how the photo, and Elizabeth’s miserable year at Central, influenced both their lives, with both good and bad consequences.

Unlike many of her peers, Hazel begins to feel remorse, and within a few years, contacts Elizabeth to apologize. Eventually, they form a friendship, touring together as eyewitnesses and participants in history—but later, the friendship unravels. Reconciliation, it turns out, is a very messy business, especially when one side holds grudges not only against her white tormentors, but against some of her allies whom she saw as manipulating her situation to advance their agenda without regard to her own needs—while the former tormentor has a need to move on but doesn’t grasp the deeper psychology of the trauma she helped create.

It should be required reading for any diplomat or therapist trying to end a long feud, from a family conflict on-up to the centuries-old race and ethnic hatreds that lead to war. For healers looking for a glimpse of how violence can create long-term trauma and destroy brilliant potential in the victim, but also how it can eat away at the perpetrator. And yes, for business owners who want a positive role in the world, whether or not they are typically seen as having already earned it.

Pre-order now: http://yalepress.yale.edu/yupbooks/book.asp?isbn=9780300141931

Hear & Meet Shel

July:

  • Clamshell Alliance Reunion and Planning Conference, World Fellowship, Conway, NH, July 22-24, http://www.worldfellowship.org/prog2011.shtml#22-Jul . Help plan a clean energy future and shut down the nukes! I have been a strong opponent of nuclear power since 1974, when I researched and wrote a college paper, and discovered how horrible it is. If Fukusjhma didn’t convince you, maybe the Associated Press year-long study on nuclear safety will. Links to three of the four parts of the AP report are on my blog, at http://greenandprofitable.com/latest-ap-nuke-safety-report-population-growth-not-factored-in/ and http://greenandprofitable.com/nuclear-safety-procedures-are-absolutely-unacceptable/.
  • Leading a teleseminar, Making Mainstream Media Your Book Launch Partner, on getting free publicity–for D’Vorah Lansky’s Book Launch Formula telesumit (20 speakers). http://3bl.me/n3wgtb Tuesday, July 26, 3 p.m. EDT
  • Another teleseminar, on effective and profitable uses of Twitter for National Association of Independent Writer and Editors: “Twitter for Writers: Greatest Thing Ever or Waste of Time?”  Here’s an excerpt from the course description, which you can’t see unless you’re a member:
    Shel usually spends between 5-20 minutes a day on Twitter. Yet he has 4,510 followers (all organically acquired–no cheats or automated software) on Twitter as of 6/30/11, gets retweeted frequently, has Twitter connections with some of the top names in marketing and publishing, has been a featured guest on several high-profile TweetChats–and used Twitter to help propel his most recent book launch to reach an estimated 5 million people. Join Shel as he shows you
    - Four different types of Tweets and how best to use them
    - Three super-effective tools that will vastly increase your efficiency with social media
    - Strategies to stay active, get noticed, and still keep Twitter from taking over your life
    http://3bl.me/petqfa (cost of this program is applied to membership, if you join). Wednesday, July 27, at 3:30 p.m. EDT.

September

October

Negotiating on several other speaking engagements. Remember–if you set me up an engagement, you could earn a generous commission.

Friends Who Want to Help

Want to create more business on LinkedIn? This series of templates and guides will help you beef up your profile, have a more authoritative presence in discussion forums, and generally make it more likely to actually do business. In fact, while I was reviewing this material, I stopped what I was doing twice–once to change my profile headline, and once to make some changes in the way my Green And Ethical Business group is set up–and I’m not exactly a LinkedIn newbie (in fact, I was member #150225 out of more than 100,000,000). www.InstantLinkedInMarketingTemplates.com/shel

Every day, I take a few moments to review the things I’m grateful for. I think this actually helps create more things to be grateful for. Kim Serafini’s new book i am gr8ful for you is a collection of fun photos, inspirational thoughts and meditations. A great thing to keep in your bathroom, or perhaps right by your bed to look at at the very beginning and end of the day. http://iag4.info/y/22310

We all know someone who’s been burned by work-at-home scams–yet 137 million people worldwide successfully telecommute. Leslie Truex’s new Jobs Online: How to Find and Get Hired to a Work-At-Home Job helps you learn about jobs that match your skills, interests and hobbies–*and* how to separate the genuine offers from the rip-offs. Plus you’ll find hundreds of companies that take applications continuously. http://3bl.me/2kqk4p