Category Archive for Green Living

The Clean and Green Club, June 2017

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
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Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, June 2017
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This Month’s Tip: Marketing Your Ideas Is 24/7
A famous copywriter known for his grumpy persona posted on Facebook his unhappiness with people who post pictures of their meals. He got an earful from foodies, of course.

But I responded as a marketer. I want people to experience more delicious meals made with local organic ingredients, and by the way, without meat. I’ve been vegetarian for 43 years and see vegetarianism—particularly when based in local, organic foods—as one of the easiest ways to slash your carbon footprint. I don’t preach about it, but I remind myself constantly of Buckminster Fuller’s quote, “You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.”

This was my comment on his Facebook post:

Here’s why I do it. A lot of my work as a marketer is to foster ideas that make the world better—like the idea that eating locally grown organic foods can be appetizing. I carry these ideas beyond my paid work and see a well-photographed plate with a tasty-sounding description as a part of my activism that uses my marketing skills. I’m selling the sizzle, so to speak. And interestingly enough, many of my food posts get high engagement. It’s not uncommon to get 20 or 30 likes and several comments from people far away wishing they could come share my food. It’s also a vicarious pleasure for many people, just like sharing travel pictures. And finally, since the caricature of social media is the boring “what I had for breakfast” tweet, I want to prove that it’s possible to talk about what you’re eating in an attractive, even seductive manner. But I find Facebook a much better platform that Twitter. Need more room than 140.

Why did I post this, really? Because I am always looking for ways to put my ideas in front of new audiences. On some level, I’m a marketer every waking moment. And I hope you are too.

Marketing can be fun. And we can all learn from each other.

Here are a few examples of my foodie Facebook posts. Let me “focus group” you: do you find these capture your interest? Do they make you want to explore new foods? Am I succeeding as a spokesperson for this idea? Please share on the Comments page and we can all learn from this.

I’ll start with one that contained eight pictures (including the three just below). Obviously, some of the text refers to pics of the garden harvest that I’m not including here.

 

Who could believe that all these frost-sensitive veggies (1st pic) were still in my garden on October 24? Even a tiny (but absolutely delicious) zucchini. It’s supposed to go down to 34°F tonight, so I harvested everything fragile. In the harvest pic, you can see some of the beans have speckled pods. Those pods were too tough to eat, but the beans inside were great (2nd pic). 3rd pic is probably the last near-100% from-our-garden dish of the year (except I cheated with a bit of organic local shallot grown three miles up the road). Beans in pods, beans removed from the tough pods, tomatoes harvested green last week and now finally ripe, and that itsy-bitsy green non-polka-dot zucchini (I’m dating myself, I know—who gets the reference?) Served it with (local organic) sweet potato and organic (nonlocal) lentil tacos and a green salad, shown here when it was all still from Next Barn or our garden. Later, I added olives and hazelnuts. And while I was waiting for Dina to come home, I sliced up and began drying our remaining supply of home-grown jalapeños, most of which actually got to ripen and turn red on the vine. The ones I picked today were green. #locavore

 

Another great #locavore dinner: frozen corn and zucchini with dried tomatoes, local cheddar cheese, and salsa; sweet potato, tot soi, shallots, garlic, and ginger in peanut sauce; spinach-arugula-carrot salad with goat gouda, local brie, sunflower seeds, local home-roasted squash seeds flavored with cayenne and salt, and local apple. All the veggies and fruits other than what was in the salsa were local and organic. The zucchini, tomatoes, butternut squash were from our own garden. Two of the three cheeses were local. The peanut butter was locally ground but not locally grown. I don’t think anyone does peanuts around here. But there is a farm that does local organic ginger, and we buy it exclusively.

New on the Blog
 
 
 
 
Hear and Meet Shel
Proud to be a speaker at Marc Guberti’s Content Marketing Success Summit, June 6-17. Other speakers include Ray Edwards, Ana Hoffman, and Jay Papasan. Take a look at the whole program at http://shelhorowitz.com/go/ContentMarketingSuccessSummit/ — or jump directly to the All-Access Pass s you can listen anytime from now to forever: http://shelhorowitz.com/go/ContentMarketingAllAccessPass/

The Web Bender, Jack Humphrey, and JV Queen Gina Gaudio-Graves
interview me on Leverage Masters Radio Tuesday, June 27, noon ET/ 9 a.m. PT. Listen by calling 646-478-0823, or listen live online at http://www.BlogTalkRadio.com/jvqueen , or later on replay at http://TheLeveragists.com

Order your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Find out more and order from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies directly from me). http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
 
Download a free sampler with several excerpts, the complete Table of Contents and Index, and all the endorsements.
Another Recommended BookPractical Bliss
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Practical Bliss: The Busy Person’s Guide to Happiness by Lisa Broesch-Weeks (InBliss, 2016)

Several times a year, an interviewer asks me, “what was the best decision you ever made?” I always answer, “the decision in my 20s to have a happy life.” That decision influenced everything else from that day forward. I believe it has been the key to my productivity, and the change I’ve made in the world.

Yes, it was a conscious decision. And yes, you can choose that path as well.

My client Lisa Broesch-Weeks can help you get there. She sent me a copy of her book, and as soon as I saw the title, I knew I’d like it. As a busy person, I love the idea of happiness for busy people, and I love the idea that bliss can be practical. She uses “bliss” and “happiness” pretty much interchangeably, seeing bliss as simply a more complete version of happiness (p. 96). I see more of a difference: bliss is more of a temporary high, while happiness, to me, is an ongoing state—but for this review, I’ll accept her near-merging of the terms.

Happy people. Lisa says, have figured out how to advance their purpose—which will be a verb, not a noun (pp. 44-48) and will be widely different for different people—with every part of their lives. And their purpose is not tied to serving one particular individual (p. 58).

They don’t beat themselves up striving for perfection; they’ve replaced stress-inducing words like “search” with power words like “explore” and “uncover” (p. 57). At work, they’re more productive and more engaged. Gallup put the cost of “employee disengagement” at $300 billion per year (p. 18), so there are dollar figures on that engagement. And at home, they enjoy better relationships, better health, and better brain function (pp. 21-24).

A lot of keeping happy is basic self-care: not letting yourself get overstressed…learning to say no to tasks that don’t advance your purpose or to people who deplete your energy…taking time for vacations, exercise, and other self-care (pp. 27-28) …and making space for your passions and pleasures. She reminds us that machines don’t run without time for recharging and maintenance, and neither do people (p. 26).

More stuff doesn’t create more bliss. And neither does running on the “hedonic hamster wheel” (p. 78—what an amazing metaphor!). And certainly you don’t get there by neglecting your passions in favor of something that feels “more important” but usually isn’t (p. 96). She points out that no one else is going to relieve you of your “optional obligations and stressors” and offers strategies to get rid of them in ways that don’t alienate others (p. 104).

Not all stress is avoidable, of course, and she provides help with managing the mandatory stress. As an example, she suggests worrying less about the need to appear constantly busy and more about how to add value (p. 111)—and shows some ways to shift focus from what’s wrong to what’s right, phrasing our goals and accomplishments in ways that the brain can hear and absorb, and act upon (pp. 119-126). Once concept I especially loved was the idea of gratitude for the wonderful future you expect, and not just for a present that may or may not seem fulfilling. She notes that this transformation helped her “put myself in situations where I would make it easier for success to find me” (p. 134). Time in gratitude, she says, is not an expense but an investment.

As the book wraps up, she advises on how to thrive despite happiness “haters” and how to forgive them (pp. 154-156). Though some of her advice may seem obvious, it can be hard to see from the outside, and always worth reminding ourselves: “I have what might be startling news. Living in bliss is a journey, much more than a destination…you may not know when you’ve arrived (p. 141, emphasis in original).

Note: Although I have done some consulting for Lisa, this review is not part of that arrangement and I am not being compensated for it.

Recent Interviews & Guest Articles: 

Shel’s done 22 podcasts recently, ranging from 5 minutes to a full hour. Click here to see descriptions and replay links.
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About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of ten books…international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel), his newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, has already won two awards and is endorsed by Jack Canfield and Seth Godin. Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Going Beyond Sustainability, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He’s an International Platform Association Certified Speaker and was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.
He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).
“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

The Clean and Green Club, May 2017

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
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Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, May 2017
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This Month’s Tip: Why I Threw Away This Letter

The fund appeal above is from a group I’ve supported often in the past. It’s a group that does great work. But I got only as far as the salutation before I knew it was going straight into the recycle bin. I stopped to scan it so I could share it with you, and then off it went into the mighty blue bin.

Why? Because I’ve made a pledge not to respond to manipulative marketing, and I consider this manipulative. If you’ve been reading this newsletter, you know I’ve been calling for honesty in marketing for many years. And whenever someone markets to me in a way I don’t consider honest, my wallet stays securely in my pocket.

I would not have objected to a salutation of Dear Dina (my wife’s first name). But when a mass mailing uses a font that looks like handwriting to cross out Dear Friend and change it to Dina, I feel insulted. Clearly, this is an attempt to make this think a human being has been involved in the change.

I’ve received fund letters from local charities where the generic salutation was replaced with our names—but those are typically done by hand and signed by someone we actually know. And yes, I give those letters more careful consideration, and usually give something. In other words, this technique works when done correctly. There’s nothing manipulative about that. A real person has gone through the list, selected people in his or her circle, and personalized those letters.

But doing this on an entire mass mailing, using a handwriting font—that’s deception, pure and simple. We do not know the president of this organization. We’ve supported this group in the past, but I don’t like being tricked into making a contribution. So instead of giving some bucks, I’m sharing this with you.

In case you’re wondering, I checked the envelope. The stamp was presorted first class, an in-between option that’s cheaper than regular first class but more expensive than bulk mail, and requires the same sort of pre-processing that third-class bulk mail does. You can’t easily hand-edit a letter in a presort mailing. In other words, the odds are 99 to 1 that it was not hand-corrected.

NOTE: If you’re wondering why I’m sharing a letter dated last November, it’s because that’s when I wrote this article. I often work several months ahead with the main articles and sometimes the book reviews. This didn’t feel so time-sensitive but I needed to bump it up.
New on the Blog
What Role Can Nonstrategic Mass Movements Play in Social Change? http://greenandprofitable.com/what-role-can-nonstrategic-mass-movements-play-in-social-change/

Why “Popularity Contest” Surveys are Useless http://greenandprofitable.com/why-popularity-contest-surveys-are-useless/

40 Years Ago Today, We Changed the World (five part series beginning http://greenandprofitable.com/40-years-ago-today-we-changed-the-world-part-1/ and linking from each installment to the next

What I Told the DT Administration: Business Case for Paris Accord http://greenandprofitable.com/what-i-told-the-dt-administration-business-case-for-paris-accord/
Hear and Meet Shel
The debut of my brand new talk, How Social Entrepreneurs Can Thrive in a Trumpian World, was a webinar put on by Green America last month (my fourth for them). Catch the replay at https://youtu.be/GderLF6vn0s

Karina Crooks interviews me on the Business Code Podcast: http://businesscodetalk.com/podcast/shel-horowitz/ :

  • What mangrove trees can teach engineers
  • Why “coopetition” works
  • What will social entrepreneurship look like 20 years from now
  • How a seamstress and an electrician separately changed the world, three decades apart
  • How to create a successful mass movement

I missed Book Expo America last year after attending every one since 1997. But it’s back in NYC and my daughter is NOT getting married the following week (as she did in 2016), so I will be attending (May 30-June 2). Contact me if you’d like to meet for coffee.

Proud to be a speaker at Marc Guberti’s Content Marketing Success Summit, June 6-17. Other speakers include Ray Edwards, Ana Hoffman, and Jay Papasan. Take a look at the whole program at http://shelhorowitz.com/go/ContentMarketingSuccessSummit/ — or jump directly to the All-Access Pass s you can listen anytime from now to forever: http://shelhorowitz.com/go/ContentMarketingAllAccessPass/

The Web Bender, Jack Humphrey, and JV Queen Gina Gaudio-Graves
interview me on Leverage Masters Radio Tuesday, June 27, noon ET/ 9 a.m. PT. Listen by calling 646-478-0823, or listen live online at http://www.BlogTalkRadio.com/jvqueen , or later on replay at http://TheLeveragists.com

Order your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Find out more and order from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies directly from me). http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
 
Download a free sampler with several excerpts, the complete Table of Contents and Index, and all the endorsements.
Another Recommended BookFrom Dictatorship to Democracy
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From Dictatorship to Democracy: A Conceptual Framework for Liberation by Gene Sharp (The New Press, 2012)

Social change—eliminating such evils as hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change—has been at the core of my work for more than four decades. Long before I started wrestling with the idea of harnessing the business community to achieve these big goals through profitable products and services back in the early 2000s, I devoted significant volunteer time to making a better world.

And now that the government of my own country, the United States, is taking significant steps backward, I will occasionally step out beyond the business world and find inspiration and information from completely different channels.

This month’s book review is one of those. Gene Sharp is the preeminent applied nonviolence theorist in the US today. I first discovered his work in the early 1980s and read all the way through his very dense, three-part Politics of Nonviolent Action back then, after hearing him speak.

So I was excited to find a much shorter and more readable distillation of his work that I feel comfortable recommending here. It’s only 138 pages, but it may shift your thinking about how to not just achieve social change but actually overthrow dictators. In fact, Sharp has been cited as an influence by nonviolent warriors around the world, including the Arab Spring movement and the struggle against apartheid in South Africa, among others.

While some agents of change see them as points on a continuum, Sharp makes a clear distinction between nonviolent and violent struggles:

  • Strategic nonviolent methods—which use not just visible protests but many tactics involving withdrawal of cooperation from the regime—tend to work better and faster: “Withdrawal of support is…the major required action to disintegrate a dictatorship.”
  • They create sympathy among the populace, while violent struggles create alienation and anger toward the agents of change
  • They play to the strengths of the protestors, while violent tactics play to the government’s strength (since the government is always better armed and usually better trained in fighting)
  • They create decentralized movements and alternative governance structures that spread leadership skills much more widely—and this becomes key when planning for and setting up the replacement government
  • They generate a peace based on freedom and justice, and not on repression

Sharp has a strong preference for deeply strategic campaigns, and notes that while tactics might shift during repression, the overall strategy should be carefully nurtured; the repression is designed to get the movement to abandon its successful strategies, and thus is a sign of victory (pp. 90-91). And if the populace is willing to endure repression, repression or the threat of it will not longer be enough to prop up the dictatorship (pp. 106-107).

He suggests starting with small, low-risk campaigns that lead to relatively easy victories, celebrating them and then expanding the demands. And he provides some excellent strategy checklists, such as seven positive characteristics of successful nonviolent political defiance (p. 44) and eight factors to consider when preparing to take power (pp. 84-86). He even looks at how to win over the military in ways that don’t foster a coup d’état (pp. 100-101), and how to defeat a coup if one happens (pp. 117-118).

And he notes the importance of being prepared in the event of either rapid or slow-moving victory (p. 111)—something I learned the hard way when Save the Mountain, a movement I’d started—achieved its goals very quickly and had no second stream of activity to take up the energy; our organization, which could have played a role in many other campaigns, simply withered away. Expanding out to the level of ending a repressive government, if the activists are not prepared to create a government, someone else will step into the vacuum, with potentially disastrous consequences for freedom.

Successful nonviolent regime change will be more permanent and well accepted if it takes seriously the charge of protecting the rights of its citizens, including its minorities. Sharp points out (p. 122) that following the victory, the citizens are now well-schooled in how to bring down governments, will be resilient and resistant against future attempts to grab power at the expense of citizens, and willing to struggle together to achieve a free and just society.

The book concludes with a list of 198 nonviolent tactics grouped into six broad categories:

  1. Economic noncooperation: boycotts (6 subcategories)
  2. Nonviolent protest and persuasion (10 sub-categories)
  3. Social noncooperation (3 subcategories)
  4. Economic noncooperation: boycotts (6 subcategories)
  5. Political noncooperation: strikes (7 subcategories)
  6. Nonviolent intervention (5 subcategories)

Even if your current organizing has much more modest goals than regime change, this book will give you a solid grounding in theory and many practical tools. Highly recommended.

Listen to the Best Interview I’ve Ever Done
Kymm Nelsen of the Conscious Leadership Podcast managed to pull more from me than anyone else has ever done. In 51 minutes, we covered so much that I list 17 separate points on my interviews page —and that was not a complete list. It’s one of three shows I’ve added to that page. Visit the page to scan the list and note what to listen for—and of course to click over and read it.

And watch this space for links to interviews by Internet marketer Willie Crawford, PR queen Annie Jennings’ Elite Wire, Lisa Faulkner of Game Changers, Ali Salman of Escape the 9 to 5 Grind, and Karina Cooke of the Business Code Podcast.

Recent Interviews & Guest Articles: 

Shel’s done 20 podcasts recently, ranging from 5 minutes to a full hour. Click here to see descriptions and replay links.
Connect with Shel

 

 

Find on Facebook

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of ten books…international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel), his newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, has already won two awards and is endorsed by Jack Canfield and Seth Godin. Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Going Beyond Sustainability, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He’s an International Platform Association Certified Speaker and was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.

He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).

“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

The Clean and Green Club, December 2016

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
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Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, December 2016
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Making the Business Case on Climate Change to Trump
Last month, I mentioned that I wrote to Trump and made a business case for continuing to honor Paris. You can read my open letter on GreenBiz.com, https:/www.greenbiz.com/article/making-business-case-climate-change-trump . Interestingly, I read recently that Leonardo DiCaprio had given Trump and his daughter copies of his video on climate change, which I believe makes a similar case.
This Month’s Tip: 10 Reasons to Build Social Responsibility into Your Business

When I’m interviewed, I find that most reporters and radio hosts have this idea that creating a socially response business is onerous. They think it adds costs, complexities and headaches—and many of them wonder why anyone would go through the “bother.”

Well, they got one part right. It does add a layer of complexity. But if you do it right, social entrepreneurship creates so many benefits! Consider a few of them:

  1. You generate consumer loyalty; customers feel good about supporting socially/environmentally responsible businesses, and are even willing to pay higher prices.
  2. Customers become allies in both product development and problem resolution.
  3. You create deep loyalty among your employees; they’re happy to go to work each day, and they brag about working at your firm. This improves productivity and employee retention. And that employee loyalty reduces training and onboarding costs; it even creates a pipeline to find new employees among your current employees’ friends and family.
  4. Customers, employees, suppliers, and distributors do some of your marketing for you.
  5. You’ll have an easier time raising capital. Your options will expand beyond traditional investors and banks to crowdsourcing. Consider entrepreneurial platforms like Kickstarter, GoFundMe, IndieGoGo, and Barnraiser—as well as sites dedicated to social change and environmental crowdfunding, such as https://startsomegood.com/ or https://www.ioby.org/ . You can also attract corporate sponsors and even grants.
  6. It’ll be much easier to find joint venture partnerships that leverage more than one organization’s skills for the benefit of all.
  7. As you start to go public about your social response efforts, you’ll be asked to share best practices as a speaker and/or writer (which have lots of benefits of their own).
  8. Media will be happy to tell your story—and you don’t have to pay to get that exposure.
  9. If you do screw up, you’ll have more latitude while you make it right.
  10. You lower both the risk and the weight of negative consequences from boycotts to lawsuits.

Isn’t all that worth some extra complexity?

Next month: How to Choose the Right Social Responsibility Path for Your Particular Business. And meanwhile, wishing you a very happy holiday season, whatever holiday you celebrate.

Hear and Meet Shel
Master marketer Willie Crawford interviews Shel Thursday, January 26 (rescheduled from December 1). And he will take questions live on the air. Watch next month’s newsletter for listening instructions.

Monday and Tuesday, March 28-29, I think I will be attending the Ethical Corporation conference in New York City, and moderating at least one session. Details not firmed up as of press time.

Order your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Find out more and order from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies directly from me). http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
 
Download a free sampler with several excerpts, the complete Table of Contents and Index, and all the endorsements.
Another Recommended BookPower and Love
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Power and Love: A Theory and Practice of Social Change by Adam Kahane (Berrett-Koehler, 2010)

I’ve been working for social and environmental change since 1969. That’s even longer than my time in marketing, which started in 1972. Back then, what I was marketing was my views on social issues, especially the Vietnam War.

During my early times of active organizing, I would have found this book incredible helpful. Much later, without knowing it, I used Kahane’s model in the most successful organizing I’ve ever been involved with: Save the Mountain, in my own town of Hadley, Massachusetts, US.

Kahane traces the evolution of his thinking through his direct involvement in all sorts of global struggles, from rebuilding South Africa after the end of apartheid to looking for peaceful solutions to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict to helping Guatemala and Colombia emerge from totalitarianism. Serious struggles, in other words. And he acknowledges that he did many things wrong before he discovered his key insight:

Power and love are the yin and yang of organizing. Neither one is        effective without its “opposite.” Either one by itself will        eventually evolve from a generative, positive focus at the start to        a degenerative, socially hostile outcome—but together, they help        us achieve great things.

You can look at this through an Eastern Taoist lens, as I did just now. But you can also frame it as a Germanic Hegelian or Marxian dialectic: power and love are the thesis and antithesis; their synthesis is positive social change. A third lens is one I learned studying comedy improv about ten years ago: replace either-or with both-and.

Whichever lens you look through, the combination of power and love is very effective. They balance each other, keep each other in check, and maintain a generative focus. And we need this kind of holistic approach to move forward.

Martin Luther King defined power as the ability to achieve a purpose (p. 12). Unchecked by love, power-to (positive, change-oriented) devolves into power-over (oppressive, protective of inequality). Paul Tillich notes (p. 46) that power-to destroys oppressive institutions, but power-over destroys people—sometimes in ways that are hard to see. Kahane says that his own wife, a South African and veteran of the struggle there, would rather deal with overt than covert racism (p. 48). But when love comes in to bring power into balance, you can achieve power-with, and real unity (p. 138). And that’s when things start to move forward.

Love can morph in similar ways. Validation of another can crumble into a stifling forced unity/false consensus (p. 49, p. 65, p. 92) or a state of mind that feels good but can’t change anything. But combining awareness of power relationships leads to a multipartisan (NOT bipartisan) approach (p. 118) that recognizes the need to collaborate with opponents—and you don’t have to like them in order to love them (p. 31).

Kahane suggests inquiring specifically about the power and love in any situation, and poses ten questions to determine who brings what into the mix (p. 73).

Although I took four pages of notes, I’m keeping this review short and deliberately omitting many of Kahane’s key points. Why? Because if you’re doing social change, or running a social change business, you will get far more out of Kahane’s ideas and experiences by spending a few hours with the book, and I want you to be able to apply the many powerful lessons I haven’t even touched upon.

But here’s a really good offer for you: I actually typed out my notes (something I almost never do) and if you read the book, I’ll share with you. Email me a receipt that shows you bought the book or a photo that shows you got it out of the library and I’ll send my notes so you get more value out of your reading.

Recent Interviews & Guest Articles: 

Shel’s done 16 podcasts recently, ranging from 5 minutes to a full hour. Click here to see descriptions and replay links.
Connect with Shel


 

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About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of ten books…international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.
He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).
“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

The Clean and Green Club, September 2016

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
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Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, September 2016
Exercise your brain for a good, green cause: Visit http://greenandprofitable.com/lets-have-some-fun-with-a-stillborn-nuke-a-contest and enter your fun/outrageous AND your most practical ideas for what to do with a nuclear power plant that is never going to be finished. The best one in each category get a bunch of goodies from me as well as media publicity.
This Month’s Tip: Event Planning and Marketing Lessons from a Wedding, Part 3
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Marketing/addressing audience needs
The first two parts of this three-part series focused on the logistics of a complex event. But typically, you have an event in order to further your organization. So even if it’s only for your own employees, it serves a marketing purpose. This final installment will look at the marketing aspects.

As a Vendor, Be Agile and Adaptable

The caterer we chose was remarkably flexible, and that’s why this organization—a high-end restaurant in the area—got hired. My daughter is vegetarian, gluten-free, and rice-free. Her first criterion was that she could eat all the food. As a trained chef and food blogger (see her yummy recipes at http://TheSmilingOnion.com), her second was that all the food conformed to her own tastes.The restaurant chef was willing to

  • Do a tasting of the exact proposed menu in the restaurant, and even surprised us with an elegant custom-printed menu just for the four of us who attended
  • Modify her recipes based on Alana’s suggestions following the tasting
  • Negotiate the scope of services

And that’s why they got a $12,000 gig. Another caterer disqualified herself by being rigid; she was not willing to adjust her recipes or her policies to meet our needs.

Be Accessible and Communicative—Build Client Confidence in You

Two other caterers lost out because one of them never returned multiple phone calls, and the other (the least expensive) would take weeks to answer email and his answers lacked understanding of our needs. Even though he would have saved us thousands of dollars, we weren’t convinced of his ability to serve us.

There were communication issues on our end, too. For example, Bobby and Alana ordered compostable plates, cutlery, and napkins—but no one thought to communicate with the catering staff about how waste would be handled. So compostable dishes, food waste, and general trash all got lumped together and hauled off to the dump. Ooops!

As a Client, Find Out What Can Be Negotiated

The restaurant’s catering staff originally returned an estimate of $22,000. We cut that almost in half by negotiating down from what they originally planned to include; we rented our own chairs, tables, tablecloths, and tents, brought in our own liquor (which we paid their certified bartender to serve) and ice, and supplied high-end compostable plates and cutlery. Even adding back in the $3,000 we spent to obtain these items elsewhere, we saved $9,000—and they still got $12,000 (by far the largest expense).

As a Marketer, Be Creative but Stay on Message

Alana and Bobby wanted a wedding that represented who they are, individually and as a couple. They themed the entire event as a Broadway musical, complete with a Playbill and brief clips from several musicals. They wrote their own vows, scripted and rehearsed a ballroom dance, chose an officiant who would honor their cultural and personal traditions.

The finished wedding canopy

Build in Interactivity and Social Media

The wedding couple provided numerous ways for attendees to get involved, starting some months ahead by asking people to decorate a square for the wedding canopy they would be standing under (a traditional Jewish custom). They also built in several events around the wedding itself, ranging from a pizza/taco party the night before to a hike or drive up our local mountain, with its 4-state view at the top, the day after. They created a fun website just for the wedding, providing not just logistical information but two fanciful stories of their coming together. They encouraged attendees to take pictures and post them on a specific page of a photo website. And of course, there were numerous posts and new friend connections on Facebook (the right social media network for this type of event). A table was set up with Polaroid cameras and a hand-made guest book.

Honor Diversity

This wedding brought together a conservative Anglo-Mexican Christian family from Texas and a liberal Jewish family originally from NYC but living in rural New England for 35 years. Friends and family came from a dozen states. Ages ranged from preteen to people in their 80s. This diversity was reflected in the wedding ceremony, the menu, and the music (the band learned two klezmer and one mariachi songs for the occasion). Diversity was also honored in Dina’s and my decision to personally cook for the six of my relatives attending who kept Kosher—after discovering that the caterer’s option was frozen dinners that she described as similar to airplane food. We cooked four courses and supplemented that with some properly certified houmous (you may know it by its usual English spelling of “hummus”—my spelling is closer to the way it’s pronounced in its original Arab culture), cheese, and crackers. The effort we made to make sure that everyone felt welcome regardless of religion, politics, or culture was clearly appreciated by all who attended.

Honor Your Commitments—and Go the Extra Mile

The liquor store we chose had already promised to take back unopened bottles. When our ice vendor fell through a week before the wedding, we called the liquor store. The owner cheerfully agreed to sell us ice, and deliver both the ice and the booze the day of the wedding, for a very reasonable price. There was no problem returning the extras and she even waited to be paid until after the event, rather than collecting our money and refunding an unknown chunk of it. That liquor store now has our party business (and our recommendations) pretty much forever.

By contrast, the shuttle van service we hired did not honor its commitment. Both the runs back from the venue to the hotel drop-off points were made substantially earlier than the agreed time, and with no warning from the driver. As a result, three people had to stay at the site overnight instead of in their hotel rooms, and we negotiated the service to half of the agreed price, because we felt only half the service (transportation TO the wedding) had been properly provided. That company will never get a call from us again.

One final lesson: Use your powers of observation and treat everything as a learning experience. If I can get three months worth of marketing advice for you out of just one event, you can find lessons all around you.

Hear and Meet Shel
I’ll be a guest on Nicole Holland’s Business Building Rockstar Summit sometime the first 10 days of November. We taped an AWESOME deep-dive interview–and I’m in awesome company of rockstars including Marisa Murgatroyd, Dorie Clark, Lou Bortone, and several other very cool people. Each call will be available at no charge for 48 hours. If I don’t have it nailed down by press time for the October newsletter, I’ll send out a special bulletin when I have the details.

Also in November, I’ll be a guest on Jena Rodriguez’s The Brave Entrepreneur podcast. Details next month.
Friends/Colleagues who Want to Help
These days, we’re all bombarded with marketing messages–most of which are digital and lack a personal touch.

By accurately replicating handwriting, Thankster gives marketers a unique advantage through personalized handwritten cards. The result? Happier customers and higher conversion rates. http://shelhorowitz.com/go/thankster/

Order your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Find out more and order from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies directly from me). http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
 
Download a free sampler with several excerpts, the complete Table of Contents and Index, and all the endorsements.
Another Recommended Book—Connect
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Connect: How Companies Succeed by Engaging Radically with Society by John Browne (with Robin Nuttall and Tommy Stadlen) (Public Affairs Books, 2015)

Yes, I’m recommending this book by the former CEO of BP—but there’s much in here I disagree with, and I want to get that out of the way first.

Browne has a big set of blinders. He shows an awful lot of reluctance to question technology, even going so far as to embrace highly dangerous technologies like fracking, pesticide-saturated GMO crops, and nuclear power. And while I agree with him that business can be a major part of the solution to our toughest problems—like hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change—I’m less convinced than he is that business opposition to regulation is necessarily coming from a principled place.

Browne was no longer the CEO during BP’s massive Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, having left three years before. He watched from afar as his corporate child withered under the helm of Tony Hayward, who had told an audience at Stanford a year before the spill, “We had too many people that were working to save the world”—and notoriously pleaded, “I want my life back,” during the Deepwater crisis.

However, Browne was in charge during the 2005 Texas City refinery explosion that killed 15 people and an Alaska oil spill the following year (p. 121). To his credit, he understands that these incidents damaged BP’s stature and credibility, so when the rig exploded in the Gulf, the reservoir of goodwill had been sorely depleted.

So there’s a lot to set aside, and you’ll want to take this one with at least a spoonful of salt. Still, it provides a remarkable look into what it means to be a “forward-thinking” CEO of one of the largest fossil energy companies in the world—and the book contains good doses of both insight and wisdom, even if you have to filter out a good deal. He also interviewed many other big-company CEOs including Hank Paulson (later US Treasury Secretary) and Lloyd Blankfein of Goldman Sachs, Satya Nadella of Microsoft, and Indra Nooyi of Pepsico (among many others).

He points out that seeing business as the villain is nothing new; it dates back at least to the Han Dynasty in China, a century before Christ was born (p. 3). Browne includes a great deal of (very disturbing) detail on the racist, brutal, all-powerful imperialism of the British East India Company—the first modern corporation (pp. 49-57)—and of Cecil Rhodes’ equally barbaric activities in Africa (pp. 36-38).

And using business to achieve social good is nothing new either. Chocolate barons George and Richard Cadbury (UK) and Milton Hershey (US) set up humane conditions right from the get-go and saw their companies as benevolent intervenors, providing excellent working and living conditions (pp. 21-28). Henry Heinz was a strong advocate of food labeling laws, knowing that his preservative-free catsup using quality tomatoes would do better than his sodium benzoate-containing catsups of his competitors (pp. 42-43). Even many of the worst of the Robber Barons—like Andrew Carnegie and Henry Frick—men with blood on their hands and horrible working conditions for their employees—tried to rehabilitate their reputations through massive philanthropy (pp. 17-21).

What about our current century? Browne says the CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) department is an outmoded concept; siloing social responsibility doesn’t create effective change. Enron, he points out (p. 139) had a great CSR-focused mission statement. Real change has to percolate throughout the organization: in the C-suite, in operations, in marketing…not just in its own department.

And when we have this integration, he sees incredible rates of progress. He says US industry can easily reduce carbon emissions 3 percent per year, meet the 2°C limit on climate warming just by going after “cost-negative” (in other words, profitable) low-hanging fruit, and save $190 billion a year in the process (p. 88). A great example is the way Paul Polman turned Unilever around when he became CEO, with his Sustainable Living Plan:

To double the size of the business while helping 1 billion people to improve their health and well-being, halving the environmental footprint, and enhancing suppliers’ lives. Each of these three goals is directly related to Unilever’s core business activities… By using its Lifebuoy brand to improve hygiene habits, the company sells more soap and helps to cut in half the number of people who die from diseases such as diarrhoea. By investing to reduce carbon emissions and water usage, it lowers costs and minimizes its exposure to water scarcity, an issue that poses a serious risk to consumer-goods firms… (p. 158)

We already know Browne is an unabashed booster of technology. Technology contributes heavily to Browne’s view of the three most important trends that are changing the business world: artificial intelligence, a shift of the economic center of gravity from the US and Europe to Asia, and the growth of the global consumer (pp. 213-246). While I don’t share Browne’s unmitigated embrace of technology, I agree that when used properly, technology empowers people, moves them out of poverty, and cleans the environment all at once. As one example, he cites the very positive impact of mobile phone access on the fishing communities of Kerala, India (pp. 108-109). I also agree with his strong emphasis on open communication, collaborative culture, and including all stakeholders—and, of course, that business will not only be instrumental in solving these enormous challenges, but does and will benefit enormously by doing so.

Business actively contributed to many of these problems in the first place—of the top six social problems, he sees four—smoking, obesity, alcoholism, and climate change—as created by business (pp. 243-244). I’d say that another of the six, war/terrorism/violence, is largely a corporate creation as well. This is a moral justification for business working to fix them; there’s also the practical reason that fixing them can help the bottom line.

Finally, he concludes the book with a call for justice, based in corporate self-interest:

Mistreating any constituent of society eventually leads to collapse, while successful connection is rewarded with lasting commercial success…Future global development will be constrained just as badly if business is hamstrung by the hate it generates so self-destructively…I am optimistic that companies will be an enormous force for good in the future…The connected firms of the future will push the boundaries of human possibilities in their quest to contribute. They will not fracture their bonds with society (pp. 247-248).

 

Recent Interviews & Guest Articles: 

Shel’s done 13 podcasts recently, ranging from 5 minutes to a full hour. Click here to see descriptions and replay links (scroll all the way down to Recent Interviews & Guest Articles).

Connect with Shel


 

Find on Facebook

 

 

 

About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of ten books…international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).
“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

The Clean and Green Club, June 2016

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, June 2016
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This Month’s Tip: Human Energy: The Next Frontier?
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Cats seem to spend about 18 hours a day NOT doing—either sleeping or vegging out in a sunny spot with no more activity than a loud purr. We humans, on the other hand, have close to the opposite ratio. OK, so some of that time is sitting at a desk and not doing much with our bodies. But a lot of it uses kinetic energy: movement.

Of course, we’ve been using direct-capture of human energy for tens of thousands of years, at least as far back as the invention of hammers and canoes. But turning it into electricity and powering devices with it is only a few decades old, as far as I know.

Why has so little attention been paid to harnessing this movement source of energy? It’s not like the concept is new. I remember hearing about a few pioneers capturing human energy back in the 1970s. And eight years ago, The Mother Earth News ran this article: http://www.motherearthnews.com/renewable-energy/pedal-powered-generators-zmaz08onzgoe.aspx – here’s an excerpt:

David Butcher’s experience is a case in point. Every morning he goes out to his garage and pedals a stationary bike for at least a half hour. The effort he puts into his workout isn’t wasted on friction as it is in most fitness gyms. Every pedal stroke makes electricity that is sent down a cable to his office in the house to power several small electrical devices. Pedal power recharges his electric razor and his cell phone, runs a computer monitor, and periodically runs the compressor that tops off the air pressure in the tires of his vehicles. David also runs the bike generator directly to a water pump whenever necessary for aerating and filtering the small backyard fishpond.

David works out of his home office in San Jose, California, as the client services director for a Web agency, and he sits in front of a computer most of the day.

Windstream Power, another company mentioned in the article, brags that it’s been doing this since 1974! So we’ve been able to convert human output to electricity for 42 years now. Isn’t it time we had a mass movement to capture at least some of that wasted energy?

Other people are also converting treadmills to capture kinetic energy (see http://www.paddockenergy.com/bike.htm ).

My latest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/ , discusses several examples of bicycle power, among them the Copenhagen Wheel, a nonmotorized device that stores a bicyclist’s kinetic energy and releases it when that rider needs extra power (like going uphill)—and a bicycle-powered trash-hauling fleet that has successfully competed with trucks in my own area for many years.

And what better place to do it than fitness centers? Texas State University retrofitted 30 elliptical trainers to capture the electricity: http://www.txstate.edu/news/news_releases/news_archive/2009/12/Kilowatts120709.html , calling it “the largest human power plant in the world.”

That claim could well be challenged in India, where a two-month-old pilot project called FreeElectric, http://billionsinchange.com/news/billions-in-change-free-electric-india-pilot-may-2016-update , is bringing light and power to places that never had it:

Kids are able to do homework after the sun sets, freeing them to help their parents or play outside with their friends while it’s still light. Shop owners are able to continue conducting business through the evening as opposed to closing their doors at dusk. Classrooms are able to power laptops, tablets, and flat-screen televisions, connecting students and teachers to knowledge, people, information, and ideas from all over the world.

On a smaller (and much cheaper scale), a fitness center in my area started capturing kinetic energy with its exercise bikes several years ago. 

Order your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Find out more and order from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies directly from me). http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
Hear and Meet Shel

Ronald M. Allen interviews Shel on the Manage Change show, TODAY, June 15, 7 pm ET/4 pm PT http://www.blogtalkradio.com/managechange/2016/06/15/shel-horowitz–going-green-raises-your-companies-revenues

WEBINAR FOR INDEPENDENT PUBLISHERS OF NEW ENGLAND/ASSOCIATION FOR SPECIAL SALES, “Green Audiences, Green Titles, Green Printing NEW DATE Thursday, June 23, 6 p.m. ET/3 p.m. PT https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7842561726385736194 – this is a brand new program I’ve never done before, highly recommended for any publisher considering producing books for the green market and/or greening your production.

Connect with Shel


 

Find on Facebook

 

 

 

 

 

About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of ten books…international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.
He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).
“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

INTERVIEW WITH WADE TAYLOR OF WS RADIO, Monday, June 27, 2 p.m. ET/11 a.m. PT, one-hour interview with four segments:
1. Consumers: how to make buying choices that better the world
2. Small business: how to be there when the customer is ready to make that intelligent choice of a better world
3. Big business: operational excellence: lowering costs and boosting revenues by building products, services, and partnerships that not only help the planet but actively turn hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war into peace, and catastrophic climate change into planetary balance (while creating new markets)
4. Nonprofit/academic: how to be a resource and partner to business on this journey while also advancing your own agenda 
INTERVIEW ON BUSINESS BUILDING ROCKSTARS WITH NICOLE HOLLAND, Friday, August 19, midnight ET, 9 p.m. PT: http://bbrshow.com/podcast/068/
Recent Interviews & Guest Articles:
 
Mike Schwager: http://wsradio.com/051916-guerrilla-marketing-heal-world-shel-horowitz/
How I got started in social/environmental change at age 3 and returned to it (for life) at age 12. Dialog with Jack Nadel, 92-year-old entrepreneur with a green product line. The easiest ways a business can go green—and the real 7-figure savings that are possible when counting all the costs. Why market share doesn’t matter, and how to partner with competitors
Western Massachusetts Business Show with Ira Bryck, http://whmp.com/podcasts/western-mass-business-show-4-9-16/ Profiles of several companies that were founded to good in the world. Green companies as price leaders. How to get a copy of my $9.95 ebook, Painless Green: 111 Tips to Help the Environment, Lower Your Carbon Footprint, Cut Your Budget, and Improve Your Quality of Life—With No Negative Impact on Your Lifestyle at no cost.
 
Bill Newman: http://whmp.com/podcasts/the-101-best-dingers-in-baseball/ (segment starts at 28:28): A quick, intense 11-minute trip through the highlights of my work

Ask those Branding Guys: http://santafe.com/thevoice/podcasts/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world (segment starts at 9:23)
 
 

Todd Schinck, Intrepid Now, with a nice emphasis on the power of ordinary people to change the world: http://intrepidnow.com/authors/shel-horowitz-combining-principles-profits-grow-business-heal-world/ (segment starts at 2:28)

JV Crum, Conscious Millionaire, second interview: We cover my first activist moment at age 3, how I helped save a mountain, the next big environmental issue, and how a simple vow in my 20s changed my life http://consciousmillionaire.com/shelhorowitz2/ (segment starts at 3:25)

Jill Buck, Go Green Radio: http://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/92012/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world (segment starts at 0:52). The difference between socially responsible and socially transformative businesses, impact of a social agenda on employees, urban farming, new energy technologies…and a cool case study of how a dog groomer could green up.

Kristie Notto, Be Legendary: The perfect example of a business that addresses social issues, the hidden revenue model I showed a social entrepreneur, how a famous gourmet food company went head-to-head with a much larger competitor, what we can learn about engineering from nature, and why wars are solvable http://traffic.libsyn.com/belegendarypodcast/Be_Legendary_Podcast_-_Shel_Horowitz_for_itunes.mp3

 Guest on Leon Jay, Socialpreneurtv http://socialpreneur.tv/building-better-products/guerilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world (you’ll get to see what I look like when I’m overdue for a haircut/beard trim—a rare glimpse at Shaggy Shel)
 
Two-part interview on Steve Sapowksy’s excellent EcoWarrior Radio podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/pt.-1-guerrilla-marketing/id1080237490?i=363550688&mt=2/ (Listen to Part 1 before Part 2, of course)

The first of two excellent shows on Conscious Millionaire http://consciousmillionaire.com/shelhorowitz/
Another Recommended BookCradle to Cradle
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Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things, by William McDonough and Michael Braungart (North Point Press, 2002)

Have you ever *really* thought about soap? William McDonough and Michael Braungart have. Asking questions like “what kind of soap does the river [where the soap ends up after use] want?” they think about such options as:


• Eliminating the water from liquid soaps and detergents, so that the actual soap ingredients can be transported much more easily, at lower cost, and with much reduced environmental impact
• Individual-use packets of powder, formulated for specific bioregions with different water conditions and common types of textiles and packaged in fully biodegradable materials
• Designing clothes that repel dirt, as a lotus leaf does
McDonough (an architect based in the US) and Braungart (an industrial chemist in Germany who headed Greenpeace’s chemistry section before founding the German Environmental Protection Encouragement Agency) think about a lot of things most of us never question about how the modern industrial era has been cobbled together; they oppose the kludgy, unholistic “systems” that have become the norm.They thought about paper, and designed their own book using a waterproof, tree-free paper made of plastic that can be reused or recycled indefinitely with no degradation. This may seem at first an odd choice for a book about incorporating deep environmental consciousness into design

but it makes more sense when you realize that paper recycling is a flawed process that consumes a great deal of energy and inputs large quantities of chemicals to transform used paper into something not-quite-as-good.Their special paper is an example of what they call a “technical nutrient”: something developed by humans rather than nature, but of great value if it can be reclaimed. Reclaiming/reuse is generally easy when a product is composed of only technical or only natural nutrients. Too often, however, we mix natural and technical nutrients into a product that’s very hard to separate out again into those components, and thus the future value of all of it is zero. McDonough and Braungart consider this almost criminal, and stress the importance of designing everything for easy disassembly and reuse. What makes it only “almost” criminal in their eyes is intent. Usually, nobody’s trying to make the world suffer; they just don’t know any better. However, once the consequences are known, they see continuing the behavior as criminally negligent (pp. 43-44). And we need to change this “strategy of tragedy” to a strategy of change.

One way to do this is to design backward from the goal, rather than forward from the clumsy present (something I’ve been advocating for several years, including in my TEDx talk, “Impossible is a Dare“: http://www.ted.com/tedx/events/11809 *(click on “event videos”).

Human factors are also important to the authors. They oppose lifeless, soul-less buildings even if they meet all the green building standards. They think of ecosystems, “eco-effectiveness” (p. 76), rather than efficiency. And with this mindset, even industry can be a great neighbor:

 

…Industry can be so safe, effective, enriching, and intelligent that it need not be fenced off from other human activity (This could stand the concept of zoning on its head; when manufacturing is no longer dangerous, commercial and residential sites can exist alongside factories, to their mutual benefit and delight.) (pp. 87-88)

For McDonough and Braungart—and for John Todd, whom I profile in my new book Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World—waste becomes food. Whatever waste is generated, some other process or product should be able to use it.

Some other questions they like to ask, especially when toxics are involved (pp. 37-38):

  • Why is it there?
  • Is it necessary?
  • What happens if it’s recycled? Burned? These questions encourage us to ask other, implied questions:
  • What impacts do the ingredient or process have on energy and water, the waste stream, and on the ability to reuse both the final product and the leftovers?
  • What are the alternatives to using this ingredient or process?

McDonough and Braungart ask us to focus on the positive changes we want. Remove words that limit our responsibilities and our hopes to making things less bad, like “avoid,” “minimize,” “sustain,” “limit,” and “halt” (p. 45). Instead, make them not only ecologically appropriate but also fun (p. 154). Remember that effluent is no longer a problem if the effluent is cleaner than the influent and can be used again; design everything for total reuse, with no quality loss (pp. 109-110). Even a car can clean the planet as it drives (p. 179). Imperialism, they say, is a response to loss of nutrients

so use the concept of “abundancenot limits, pollution, and waste” (p. 91) as an antidote to imperialism.

Seeing materials as nutrients opens up new models beyond the usual purchase-and-dispose. Why not a rent-a-solvent business (p. 112), or a building that’s designed like a tree (p. 138), for instance?

The authors are very much against one-size-fits-all, preferring instead unique solutions adopted to each place and conditions, with plenty of redundancy (p. 185). Nature does this all the time; that’s why there are 8000 different species of ants (p. 120).

In almost 900 words, I’ve only scratched the surface. Especially if you’re in any kind of design capacity, read this book. Even if you’re not, it will change how you think and open many doors.

The Clean and Green Club, April 2016

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, April 2016
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Want to say thank you to me for all my hard work bringing you this newsletter since 1997? 

One way would be to order your copy of Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World by April 18 from Amazon–all sales before the pub date count in figuring out best-seller status, and I’m close to being a category best-seller. Would love to have your help in getting there. The book comes with cool bonuses, too: see http://impactwithprofit.com/giftsforreaders/ . Scroll down and you’ll see a green-tinted box (or plain text if you have HTML turned off) with the order link.

If you would like to do a very small and easy thing to help, consider donating a single automated Tweet and/or Facebook post, pre-written for you. It takes 30 seconds to sign up at https://www.thunderclap.it/projects/40108-business-solves-biggest-issues — just click one or more of those big red buttons.
This Month’s Tip: My Selfish Motivation for a Lifetime of Activism
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You know by now that I’m not only a marketer but a committed activist, working more than 40 years to create a better world. Now, here’s the part you might not know: I put those thousands of hours in, gave all those speeches, wrote all those books, started several movements and organizations—because I’m selfish.

But what differentiates me from, say, Donald Trump or the Koch Brothers (besides their obvious vast wealth and ultraconservative politics) is this:

—>I define making the world better as in my self-interest. I work to make the world better, so I (and my kids, their as-yet-unborn kids, my friends, and those who are suffering currently) can have a better world. That helps me and the people I care about.

It’s looked pretty much like this, going back to age 12 when I really got going with making the world better:


1969-75: peace in Vietnam. Because I didn’t want to go to war when I turned 18. I actually started mentally working on my Conscientious Objector essay when I was about 12. 

1970-present: environment, at least to a limited degree (I helped defeat my first nuclear plant in 1971, before I really knew very much). I thought clean air and clean water were not just nice-to-haves, but have-tos. How to bring them about if not by working for a cleaner environment?

1971-73: high school student rights/multiculturalism at my high school, and oddly enough, a side exploration in the Libertarian Party. Because my rights were at risk. I wanted freedom to dissent as a student, and freedom from draconian laws about things that were really no business of the government.

1973-85: LGB activism (we didn’t know more than a couple of Ts back then). The B part is about me.

1974-81: Safe energy/no nuclear power/no nuclear weapons. Because keeping the world from cataclysm is a part of those environmental have-tos.

1983-98: A lot of community board service on affordable housing, reinventing democracy, a free-form dance collective (the arts have always been part of my social change work), disability rights, and even a board advising the local District Attorney on civil rights issues from various minority perspectives. Worked with my city councilor to create the first nonsmokers’ rights regulations in our area. Also was involved in several mayor and city council races, including three where I ran as a council candidate, one where I managed a successful insurgent campaign (we won by seven votes), and a mayoral race where I wrote all the press releases. Because I wanted a better city and county to live in, and I saw the City Council as constituted in the early 1980s as a very repressive institution that did not represent the wave of new immigrants to town such as myself.

1999-2000: Founded and played key organizing/leadership roles in a group that saved a local mountain in just 13 months (I thought it would take 5 years). And it means that every time I drive by that site (just a mile from my house), I DON’T have to look at ugly houses going all the way up to the ridge line, or sit in traffic as they exit onto the main road.

2002-present: Reinventing the business world as an ethical, environmentally conscious partner in transformational social change
the last two years of it focused on turning hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war into peace, and catastrophic climate change into planetary balance. Because, thinking holistically, making business a partner in bettering the world betters conditions for the people and other critters that live here—and that includes me. And also because business has the resources, technology, and yes, motivation to do this work, where activists are often lacking some of those pieces.

So there you have my true confession: I make the world better, so I can live in a better world. And isn’t that as good a motivation as any?

What’s YOUR motivation to change the world?

Preorder your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Release date is April 19, just in time for Earth Day, and you can now preorder from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies from me). Learn all about this powerful book at http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
Shel Interviews Thought Leaders
Michael Shuman, author of The Local Economy Solution, is the first person I’ve interviewed for a new series with thought leaders in enviro-friendly and/or transformational business. Michael talks about why most conventional economic development makes no sense and what to do instead. http://transformpreneur.com/2016/04/08/michael-schuman-why-most-economic-development-programs-are-a-disaster/
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About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriteraward-winning author of ten booksinternational speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.

He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).

“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

NEW YORK BOOK LAUNCH EVENT for Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World: Green America’s Green Festival—New York, TOMORROW, Saturday, April 16, Javits Center. Mainstage talk at 11:30 a.m. followed by book signing. This is a great event; I’ve attended several times and this will be my third time speaking. Not just terrific speakers but also great organic food samples and cool products like the wallet and purse vendor who makes stuff out of old tires (I use one of those wallets that I bought there a couple of years ago).
GUEST ON THE BILL NEWMAN SHOW, WHMP 1400 AM & 96.9 FM, Northampton, MA and online, Monday, April 18, between 9-10 a.m. ET  http://whmp.com/podcasts/shows/bill-newman/

GUEST FOR ASK THOSE BRANDING GUYS, Monday, April 18, 1:15 p.m. ET/10:15 a.m. PT, http://www.santafe.com/thevoice/stream and live over KVSF (101.5 FM) Santa Fe, NM

INTERVIEW WITH TODD SCHNICK, http://intrepidnow.com, airs April 18 (and beyond)

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION DATE FOR Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World is Tuesday, April 19—and Earth Day is Friday, April 22

SECOND OF J.V. CRUM’S TWO INTERVIEWS ON CONSCIOUSMILLIONAIRE.COM, Tuesday, April 19 (almost no overlap between this and the earlier show listed at “recent interviews”) 


AN EXCERPT FROM Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, Brand Identity in a Global Economy, is scheduled to run Tuesday, April 19 at CarolRoth.com

WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS BOOK LAUNCH EVENT for Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, Wednesday, April 20, 7 p.m., Odyssey Bookshop, South Hadley. Come early if you want a seat; I’m expecting to fill the room.


HOW TO BUILD A MOVEMENT: INTERVIEW GUEST FOR KRISTIE NOTTO’S BE LEGENDARY PODCAST (f/k/a Kristie T), Wednesday, April 20, 3 p.m. ET/noon PT, http://awesomesaucemarketing.net/kristie-notto-chats-with-shel-horowitz/

SLOW LIVING SUMMIT, Brattleboro, VT, April 28-30 (theme: Food and Agriculture Entrepreneurship), http://www.slowlivingsummit.org/ My talk will be on the 30th @ 1:30 pm: “Impossible is a Dare: How Your Food Business Can Make a Difference on Hunger, Poverty, War, and Catastrophic Climate Change

GUEST ON THE BARRY MOLTZ SHOW, any time after Sunday, May 1, 6:30 a.m. ET http://barrymoltz.com/business-insanity-talk-radio-with-barry-moltz/

GUEST ON GO GREEN RADIO WITH JILL BUCK, Friday, May 6, noon ET/9 a.m. PT http://www.voiceamerica.com/show/1303/go-green-radio

GUEST ON THE ENRICHMENT HOUR WITH MIKE SCHWAGER, Thursday, May 19, 7 p.m. ET/4 p.m. PT http://wsradio.com/category/lifestyles/the-enrichment-hour-with-mike-schwager/ (and archived on that link afterward)

WEBINAR FOR INDEPENDENT PUBLISHERS OF NEW ENGLAND, “Green Audiences, Green Titles, Green Printing” Thursday, May 26, 6 p.m. ET/3 p.m. PT https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7842561726385736194



Recent Interviews & Guest Articles:

Guest on Leon Jay, Socialpreneurtv http://socialpreneur.tv/building-better-products/guerilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world (you’ll get to see what I look like when I’m overdue for a haircut/beard trim—a rare glimpse at Shaggy Shel)

Western Massachusetts Small Business Show with Ira Bryck http://whmp.com/podcasts/western-mass-business-show-4-9-16/

Friends Who Want to Help
Shift Network presents a telesummit, Earth Day Summit: Renewed Hope, Real Solutions and Reverence for Mother Earth, April 22 (Earth Day).

On April 22, esteemed green experts, spiritual leaders, innovators, activists, scientists and luminaries from around the globe are coming together to offer us all a renewed sense of hope, real solutions and reverence for Mother Earth. Join Starhawk, Kenny Ausubel, Vicki Robin, Chief Phil Lane, Jr., David Crow, Xiuhtezcatl Martinez and others for this no-charge online gathering — and find inspired actions for a healthy, sustainable and thriving planet. http://earthdaysummit.com/

Another Recommended Book: The Earth’s Best Story
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The Earth’s Best Story: A Bittersweet Tale of Twin Brothers Who Sparked an Organic Revolution by Ron and Arnie Koss (Chelsea Green, 2010)

This is a very well-written book—but not a pretty story. The twin brothers who founded Earth’s Best, the first company ever to produce organic baby food at commercial scale and with national distribution, planted a flag in the ground for 100% organic, top quality, and unwavering ethics.

Starting an organic baby food company turned out to be a whole lot harder than, say, manufacturing natural ice cream. Especially when you have no experience manufacturing anything at all (never mind the specific and very complex world of making baby food), you’re wildly undercapitalized, you discover that no existing manufacturing plant can keep the organic food separate so you have to build your own, your production equipment is beyond ornery, and you’ve chosen to locate in Vermont—3000 miles from the California base of most of the organic commercial growers that existed in the late 1980s US.

It gets even harder when you have to bring in venture capitalists with no understanding of the organic movement and no respect for the company culture, and you’re forced to give up control inch by inch over a period of years. These two very decent men got slapped in the face by the production issues and then knifed in the back repeatedly by the players they brought in to save the company.

Amazingly, Earth’s Best somehow survived, and was eventually sold to Heinz, and then to the natural foods conglomerate Hain Celestial. And it eventually became profitable, though long after the founders were forced out. And not so amazingly, the idea of natural baby food caught on, and all the major players eventually added natural and organic lines. For this, eco-conscious parents should give thanks to these brothers.

But the real reason to read this book is to learn from their mistakes. Use it as a negative playbook, so if you’re ever going for funding, you’ll know how NOT to get shafted. Too bad crowdfunding didn’t exist back then.

Of course, the book is told from their points of view. Those they battled with might tell a different story. And they made a number of errors, and then kept making them. Issues with sourcing and manufacturing had to be overcome, and sometimes that meant dumping unsatisfactory inventory for pennies on the dollar. These things happen. But their tolerance for incompetent, arrogant managers surprised me. And even worse, after getting burned multiple times, I’d have thought they would figure out that no oral promise is worth anything. Get. Everything. In. Writing.

I’ve read a lot of corporate histories, including several in the natural foods industry or other green sectors, and I don’t think I’ve ever read such a heartbreaking one. It’s an unfortunate reminder that too many people in power see business as worse than dog-eat-dog, and those of us who view high ethical standards and a compassionate approach as assets need to protect ourselves from others who are rapacious and uncaring.

The Clean and Green Club, March 2016

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, March 2016
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Do you have five minutes to help me better understand and serve your green/social change business needs? Please fill out this quick survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/9NHHMQ8
This Month’s Tip: What’s Really Involved in Launching a Book
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Bad news for authors who think the work is done when they turn in the manuscript. That’s when the real work just begins. There’s always so much to do for a book launch.

As you know, my 10th book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World comes out April 19. I could keep five of me busy, full-time, between now and the launch date.

Here’s a bit of a window on what I’ve been up to with it. I post this both as a guideline for how to launch a book and as inspiration that even though I’m doing most of this myself, I’ve been able to get quite a bit done—even while doing numerous non-book-launch projects as well (including ghostwriting a book and helping my daughter plan her wedding). This is only a partial list:

Last summer: 

  • Secured endorsements from 22 well-known people including Jack Canfield, Seth Godin, Ivan Misner (founder of BNI), Joel Makower (founder of GreenBiz.com), and the author of The New Rules of Green Marketing (among others). 
  • Obtained four guest essays from marketers Yanik Silver and Ken McArthur, as well as Cynthia Kersey (author of Unstoppable/Unstoppable Women) and Frances Moore Lappé (Diet for a Small Planet)
  • Began talking up the book and showing around the cover at live events and media interviews
  • Put up http://goingbeyondsustainability.com for the corporate market and http://impactwithprofit.com for entrepreneurs/startups
  • Secured cooperation from my charity partner Green America and support from Jeannie and Amy Levinson, wife and daughter of my late co-author Jay Conrad Levinson

December

  • Wrote and posted several press releases with different angles
  • Assembled and posted a full media kit: http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/media-center/
  • Prepared sample reviews in three different word lengths
  • Did the first of three bulk mailings to my list
  • Began to actively tout the book in my newsletter and on social media

Jan-Feb

  • FINALLY came up with the elusive brand I’d been trying to find for two years. I feel it accurately and interestingly describes the new work I’m doing showing business how to turn hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war into peace, and catastrophic climate change into planetary balance (this is what the new book is about)—and built a new website around this brand: http://transformpreneur.com
  • Booked in-person launch events in NYC (4/16, at a major green festival), Western Massachusetts (3/8 at a prestigious college, 4/20 at our best local bookstore), and Brattleboro, VT, 4/30 (at Slow Living, a very well-regarded environmental conference)
  • Booked about a dozen podcast and radio appearances and began to tape the first several
  • Went through 1500 media and 3300 personal contacts, selecting several hundred people to reach out to, personalizing my letters to them (not just with name but with a line or two specific to each). Some I invited to be launch partners, some to cover me in their media, and some to attend the local book launch (I still have room for people in all those categories, BTW)
  • Secured commitments to promote to their own lists and/or on social media from 85 people (as of March 1) with aggregate total list size of several hundred thousand
  • Wrote a bunch of tweets, newsletter solo mailings, newsletter blurbs, and social media posts, tweaking them for three different audiences: guest essayists, endorsers, and supporters
  • Hired a publicist, worked closely with him to shape a lengthy and unusual press release, and had him send out two blasts, to 5000 reporters each time—and answered each response individually
  • Renewed contact with a VA who had sold me ten hours of time a few years ago and told her I’m ready to use it on a social media campaign
  • Contacted a publisher where I had ad credits and arranged to use them
  • Submitted several articles to various publications and had most of them accepted

March (except for a trip abroad with probably very little Internet) and April will be equally busy.

Preorder your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Release date is April 19, just in time for Earth Day, and you can now preorder from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies from me). Learn all about this powerful book at http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
Hear and Meet Shel
Connect with Shel


Find on Facebook


About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriteraward-winning author of ten booksinternational speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.

He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).

“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

WARREN WHITLOCK HOSTS ME ON BLAB, Friday, March 25, noon ET/9 a.m. PT. This is an open conversation. You can turn your camera on and join in, or ask real-time questions in the chat, as long as you give your Twitter screenname. https://blab.im/y75eqa – this will be my very first time guesting on Blab.

GUEST ON THE BARRY MOLTZ SHOW, any time after Sunday, May 1, 6:30 a.m ET http://barrymoltz.com/business-insanity-talk-radio-with-barry-moltz/

GUEST FOR RONALD M. ALLEN’S MANAGING CHANGE SHOW, Monday, April 4, 10 a.m. ET/7 a.m. PT http://www.blogtalkradio.com/managechange/2016/04/04/shel-horowitz–going-green-raises-revenues-and-lowers-costs

GUEST FOR FRANKIE PICASSO ON THE GOOD RADIO NETWORK, Tuesday, April 5, 1 pm ET/10 a.m. PT. http://www.toginet.com/shows/MissionUnstoppable

GUEST FOR ADAM LERNER’S MARKETING PODCAST, Wednesday, April 13, 1 pm ET/10 a.m. PT (episode will be recorded and posted after production @ http://learnwithlerner.com)

NEW YORK BOOK LAUNCH EVENT for Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World: Green America’s Green Festival—New York, Saturday, April 16, Javits Center. Mainstage talk at 11:30 a.m. followed by book signing. This is a great event; I’ve attended several times and this will be my third time speaking. Not just terrific speakers but also great organic food samples and cool products like the wallet and purse vendor who makes stuff out of old tires (I use one of those wallets that I bought there a couple of years ago).

GUEST ON THE BILL NEWMAN SHOW, WHMP 1400 AM & 96.9 FM, Northampton, MA and online, Monday, April 18, between 9-10 a.m. ET  http://whmp.com/podcasts/shows/bill-newman/

Guest for Ask Those Branding Guys, Monday, April 18, 1 p.m. ET/10 a.m. PT, http://www.santafe.com/thevoice/stream and live over KVSF (101.5 FM) Santa Fe, NM

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION DATE FOR Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World is Tuesday, April 19—and Earth Day is Friday, April 22.

SECOND OF J.V. CRUM’S TWO INTERVIEWS ON CONSCIOUSMILLIONAIRE.COM, Tuesday, April 19 (almost no overlap between this and the earlier show listed at “recent interviews”)


An excerpt from Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, Brand Identity in a Global Economy, is scheduled to run Tuesday, April 19 at CarolRoth.com

Mid-April (air dates not set yet): Interviews with Todd Schnick, http://intrepidnow.com, and Leon Jay, SocialpreneurTV. I should have more complete information on these next month.

WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS BOOK LAUNCH EVENT for Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, Wednesday, April 20, 7 p.m., Odyssey Bookshop, South Hadley. Come early if you want a seat; I’m expecting to fill the room.


HOW TO BUILD A MOVEMENT: INTERVIEW GUEST FOR KRISTIE NOTTO’S BE LEGENDARY PODCAST (f/k/a Kristie T), Wednesday, April 20, 3 p.m. ET/noon PT, http://awesomesaucemarketing.net/kristie-notto-chats-with-shel-horowitz/

SLOW LIVING SUMMIT, Brattleboro, VT, April 28-30 (theme: Food and Agriculture Entrepreneurship), http://www.slowlivingsummit.org/ My talk will be on the 30th @ 1:30 pm: “Impossible is a Dare: How Your Food Business Can Make a Difference on Hunger, Poverty, War, and Catastrophic Climate Change

WEBINAR FOR INDEPENDENT PUBLISHERS OF NEW ENGLAND, “Green Audiences, Green Titles, Green Printing” Thursday, May 26, 6 pm ET/3 pm PT https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7842561726385736194


Recent Interviews & Guest Articles:

Two-part interview on Steve Sapowksy’s excellent EcoWarrior Radio podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/pt.-1-guerrilla-marketing/id1080237490?i=363550688&mt=2/ (Listen to Part 1 before Part 2, of course)

Book excerpt: Green Goods and Services Are Much Easier to Market: http://homebusinessmag.com/businesses/go-green/green-goods-services-much-easier-for-businesses-to-market/

Friends Who Want to Help

Are you an introvert? My friend Val Nelson is offering a small-group mastermind just for you: The Introvert SOULpreneurs Club: http://www.valnelson.com/services/introvert-group

Another Recommended Book: Business in Blue Jeans
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Business in Blue Jeans, by Susan Baroncini-Moe (Sound Wisdom, 2013)

With 34 years in business, I’m not really the market for another book on startup success. But many of my clients and readers are, and I often read books with that audience in mind (and wish I’d read a few in the very early days of my business).

This book is warm, approachable, and full of common sense, as well as a lot of Law Of Attraction and personal motivation material to get a new business up and running on solid footing. I found that many of the suggestions were clumped into certain sections of the book; I’d take a bunch of notes on successive pages and then go 10 or 15 pages without any notes. But even those less useful sections were still a good read.

The book contains several exercises. One I found especially useful is a new way of looking at brainstorming (p. 123). She also has a very small section on business helping the wider world, and I’m glad to see it there, even if it’s not very comprehensive. (My own next book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, goes into far more detail on this.)

Some of the wise nuggets I especially like:

  • Learn how to find the love often hidden in negative messages from friends and family
  • Understand that thinking Law Of Attraction thoughts isn’t enough; you also have to do the work 
  • Create a story that’s consistent with your reality AND with your customers’ experience of you
  • Seek out not only the intersection of your skills and interests and a market, but also for the intersections of both fiery passion and the warm gentle glow (much like a successful long-term marriage)
  • Develop great branding by first targeting your market as narrowly and carefully as possible (and recognize that if you’re in different markets, you probably need different branding and marketing even for the same product)
  • Use “lean in marketing”: be interested, not just interesting, and create a positive user experience
  • Recognize that search keywords, headlines, etc., should speak to the need (the hole your prospect wants to drill) rather than the tool you provide (the drill bit)
  • Acknowledge that more isn’t always better
  • Make sure all employees know that they are the customer service department
  • See mistakes as opportunities to fix things
  • Give value, even when you’re networking

The Clean and Green Club, February 2016

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, February, 2016
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Do you have five minutes to help me better understand and serve your green/social change business needs? Please fill out this quick survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/9NHHMQ8
This Month’s Tip: Three Words to Inspire My Year—Do You Have Some?
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Dean Cycon, CEO of Dean’s Beans, making music in Rwanda
Just as all the New Years resolution stuff is quieting down, six weeks into 2016, here I come with an article about it. What’s up with that?

  1. I already had Part Two of my two-part “Make Yourself Clear” series written and scheduled for January, and didn’t want to interrupt the flow.
  2. I thought it might be more effective if it didn’t get buried in a pile of inspirational New Year’s messages—just as I’ve advised clients to think about standing out in the pack by sending an annual greeting, not at Christmas but at some other time, like Thanksgiving, Valentine’s Day, or (best of all) the client’s birthday.
  3. This may be the most personal and vulnerable article I’ve ever written, particularly when I talk about the second word. I wanted to get your full attention.

Every year, bestselling author and social media visionary Chris Brogan challenges his huge reader base to come up with three words to provide focus for the coming year. This year, I decided to take the challenge. My three words are:

  1. Transform
  2. Win
  3. Love

Here’s what they mean to me, and why I picked them:

Transform

Transform is my top word because it’s so clearly the focus of my new work. A few days ago I even bought the domain, Transformpreneur.comsm, and I’ve already started putting content up (though it’s far from finished).

First, there’s the social transformation I want to bring about by transforming the business world. I want to end the biggest crises of our time, and I see the business community as the best lever. Appealing to enlightened self-interest—the profit motive—I want to make the bottom-line business case that just as going green saved costs and increased revenue, so too can turning hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war into peace, and catastrophic climate change into planetary balance

When I first started talking a great deal about going green and being ethical as profit boosters, around 2002, people looked at me funny. Now, it’s common business wisdom. I think the same will be true eventually for creating profitable products, services, and a company DNA that address these issues at their roots—especially since we already know how to do a lot of this.

Second, the transformation in my own business. I see consulting, speaking, and writing
on how business can bring about that transformation—including working with individual businesses or organizations to develop and market the right social change products and services for its own culture and markets—as a major part of my business in the coming year, and for the rest of my working life. 

While I’ve been thinking about these things for many years, have written books and given talks about it, I still have to find the markets that are willing to pay for what I know I can do for them. I go into the year with two quite different possible markets: small
entrepreneurial and startup companies, and large, established corporations/associations. I’ve developed two different websites for these audiences, because the agenda, methodology, timetable, and price structure will be very different.

All of this is a natural outgrowth of the green business profitability work I’ve done the past several years—but while it builds on the past work, it is different. I’m confident that I can make it work, but am still a bit fuzzy on the how. Which brings us to the second word:

Win

My original choice was “succeed,” but then I went to Chris’s post. He chose “win” as one of his words, and I think it’s like success, but stronger. It can also work as both a noun and a verb, as can my third word.

Also, I feel that on many levels other than the material, my life IS a success. I made a conscious decision about 30 years ago to have a happy life, and I’ve made good on that: I love the marriage I’m in, the house and community where I live, the places I visit, the local organic fresh food I eat, the books I read, the performances I watch, and so on. 

That decision rippled through all areas of my life. As early as 1985, it was the difference between feeling angry-frustrated-cheated when I had to spend an entire day of precious vacation mailing packages back to myself, as the old me would have felt—and thinking, even before I was married, about the wonderful story I’d have to tell my grandchildren.

But there are two areas where I need to replace that general feeling of success with a clear, strong victory: the economic underpinning of my business (which has now had two low-producing years in a row while I retooled for the transformation)
and the deeper impact of my work on the world.

The problem with having many interests and multiple skill areas is that it’s really hard to focus. When everything is fascinating, how do you choose? Yet, to succeed—to win—you have to close some doors so you can pass through the doors that remain open.

This is the lens: I’m using to help me choose what to focus on:

Over the past few years, I’ve worked hard to overcome a case of what my friend Noah St. John calls “success anorexia.” I’ve looked at my money/success blocks, and overcome a number of them. But, watching my own failures doing things that have worked really well for others, I realize there’s still some hidden piece, deep in my subconscious, that courts failure. I need to find that piece, hold it up to the light, make an alliance with the parts of it that act out of love (while redirecting them), excise the parts that are rooted in self-hatred, and have a clear win. This will be difficult, because I don’t even know what it is that’s holding me back. But it’s essential.

Once that hurdle is overcome, I want to look at how to broaden my impact. I have a great message and great examples of how we can solve these big problems. 

But for that to really change the world, I need to find hundreds of thousands, maybe millions of people who are open to that transformational message. None of my books have ever sold more than a few thousand copies. My blog and social media audiences total less than 30,000. The number of people who hear me speak in a year is much too small. 

Thus, the second big win I need is to get myself in front of a far larger number of people. (If you can help with the book launch, or if you’d like to earn commissions by bringing me speaking or consulting, please get in touch! 
http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/will-you-help-business-transform-the-world/) As an extra benefit, this will help with selling more books, doing more paid speaking to larger audiences, and getting more consulting gigs—in other words, contributing to the win I’m looking for in my own blocks. At age 59, I have a limited time to make a bigger impact on the world. I want to leave a legacy of creating deep transformational change, because I love this planet. And that’s a nice transition to the third word.

Love

Love of others and of self, love of the ecosystem and the planet. In my youth, I was a very angry, loud activist who felt utterly betrayed by governments and corporations and wasn’t good at finding common ground or seeking alliances with those who thought or felt differently from me. Over the years, I’ve learned how mistaken I was—starting all the way back in the 1970s. 

Some might say I’ve softened but I don’t see that way. I’ve learned to approach with love, respect, and an understanding that almost all of us want a better world; we just have different interpretations of what that means and how to bring it about.

Love is often about deep listening. It’s also about seeking a higher good for a greater number of people, without sacrificing the needs and desires of others. It’s about building the communication skills to allow environmentalists and Tea
Partiers to discover their common ground (something I talk about very specifically in my 10th book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World).

Going deeper, this is what allows even the most hate-filled opponents to go past the hurt and build a better world for everyone. Nelson Mandela was a master of this. So are the people who organize the various Arab-Israeli joint projects such as the magnificent Wahat al-Salam/Neve Shalom community in Israel, where Jews and Arabs study and work together—the name, in both languages, translates as “Oasis of Peace”—or Combatants for Peace, which pairs Arab and Israeli former combatants to travel around and speak about cooperation.

It’s easy to love those who agree with you. It’s much harder to love those you might blame for the death of a loved one or the loss of your land. I have tremendous admiration for those involved in these sorts of cooperative efforts and I want to be more like them.

(This is revised from a blog post written January 3, 2016.)

Preorder your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Release date is April 19, just in time for Earth Day, and you can now preorder from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies from me). Learn all about this powerful book at http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
Hear and Meet Shel
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About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriteraward-winning author of ten booksinternational speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.

He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).

“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

LIVE INFORMAL PRESENTATION TO TAMARA STENN’S CLASS ON SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP, Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA, Friday, March 8, noon. Contact me for details.

GUEST FOR RONALD M. ALLEN’S MANAGING CHANGE SHOW, Monday, April 4, 10 a.m. ET, 7 a.m. PT http://www.blogtalkradio.com/managechange/2016/04/04/shel-horowitz–going-green-raises-revenues-and-lowers-costs

GUEST FOR ADAM LERNER’S MARKETING PODCAST, Wednesday, April 13, 1 pm ET/10 a.m. PT

NEW YORK BOOK LAUNCH EVENT for Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World: Green America’s Green Festival—New York, Saturday, April 16, Javits Center. Mainstage talk at 1:30 followed by book signing at 3. This is a great event; I’ve attended several times and this will be my third time speaking. Not just terrific speakers but also great organic food samples and cool products like the wallet and purse vendor who makes stuff out of old tires (I use one of those wallets that I bought there a couple of years ago).

GUEST ON THE BILL NEWMAN SHOW, WHMP 1400 AM & 96.9 FM, Northampton, MA and online, Monday, April 18, between 9-10 a.m. ET  http://whmp.com/podcasts/shows/bill-newman/

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION DATE FOR Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World is Tuesday, April 19—and Earth Day is Friday, April 22.

SECOND OF J.V. CRUM’S TWO INTERVIEWS ON CONSCIOUSMILLIONAIRE.COM, April 19 (almost no overlap between this and the earlier show listed at “recent interviews”)

WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS BOOK LAUNCH EVENT for Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, Wednesday, April 20, 7 p.m., Odyssey Bookshop, South Hadley. Come early if you want a seat; I’m expecting to fill the room.

SLOW LIVING SUMMIT, Brattleboro, VT, April 28-30 (theme: Food and Agriculture Entrepreneurship), http://www.slowlivingsummit.org/ My talk will be on the 30th: “Impossible is a Dare: How Your Food Business Can Make a Difference on Hunger, Poverty, War, and Catastrophic Climate Change

WEBINAR FOR INDEPENDENT PUBLISHERS OF NEW ENGLAND, “Green Audiences, Green Titles, Green Printing” Thursday, May 26, 6 pm ET/3 pm PT https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7842561726385736194

Recent Interviews:
The first of two excellent shows on Conscious Millionaire http://consciousmillionaire.com/shelhorowitz/ (the other will air first on my official launch date, April 19)

Behind the Business with Author & Speaker Shel Horowitz http://www.fslocal.com/blog/behind-the-business-shel-horowitz/

Friends Who Want to Help

OSHANA HIMOT (the business coach who has catapulted me exactly where I want to be in creating a career around healing the world) is again offering no-charge consultations (and her phone number has changed. She writes:

“I am a business and life coach and work with people in many fields, assisting them to expand their work. it is unique for each person – the best programs to create, the groups to work with, how to find customers and clients…

I work with people who would like to help create a better society and can benefit from coaching. For a complimentary consultation, call 602-463-6797 or email oshanaben@yahoo.com. Oshana Himot, MBA, CHT”

Another Recommended Book: Strategies for the Green Economy
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Strategies for the Green Economy: Opportunities and Challenges in the New World of Business, by Joel Makower (McGraw-Hill, 2009)


Is it really worth reading a book this old on a fast-changing subject like green business success strategy? In this case, the answer is yes. Most of what has changed only strengthens Makower’s arguments. I identified two major areas where the world is quite different now—but far more where his points are still spot-on. Note: I asked Joel if he agreed with my analysis, and his response follows my review.

What Has Changed

Perhaps the biggest change is that he found some of the greenest companies reluctant to talk about their green accomplishments, with many of them worrying so much about being accused of greenwashing (or about being tarred with the brush of bad quality that plagued some early green products) that they were unwilling to claim credit (and gain the resultant marketing advantages). These days, almost every major company is trumpeting its green achievements in its marketing, and often on its packaging too.

The second-biggest shift is in the economics of energy. Even with plummeting fossil fuel prices, clean renewable energy is increasingly cost-competitive with fossil fuels. Some new wind and solar projects are coming in at 4 cents a kilowatt—unheard of when Makower was researching his book. At that time, enterprise-scale or urban-scale green energy was still largely considered unproven in the corporate world

What’s Still (or Even More) Valid (partial list that could be much longer)

  • A shift away from pollution control to avoiding pollution in the first place (pp. 9-12)
  • The increasing adoption of biomimicry—one of the most exciting design philosophies to come down the road in decades (I’ll be reviewing an entire book on biomimicry a few months from now)
  • Certification labels and definitions of green standards are still a jumbled confused mess, people think they know more about the environment than they do, and “green hopes far outweigh green habits” (p. 37)—all of which hold back progress
  • The idea that small behavioral (and consciousness) changes can reap big dividends (p. 63)
  • The perception that municipal solid waste (household garbage) is our biggest waste problem, even though industrial trash accounts for a far larger portion (p. 112)
  • Similarly, many of the largest energy wasters (counting a product’s entire lifecycle) are surprising or hidden: for example, chilling sodas, heating water for laundry (pp. 117-119); changing the shape of its noodle enabled Hamburger Helper to save 900,000 pounds of paperboard per year (p. 141)
  • We have to market differently to different market sectors (something I stress in my own writing and speaking); for instance, many green products are sold successfully to people who don’t particularly care about the environment but care a lot about health or product longevity/quality
  • Just the act of a major retailer requesting a self-audit from its suppliers can create change (p. 147)
  • Companies can often work together far more effectively than separately to green their operations—pooling everything from leather tanning for athletic shoes (p. 197) to information
  • Enormous progress continues to be made on some fronts, such as the astounding 75 percent drop in energy use per dollar of gross domestic product between 1950 and 2008—but with the growth of the economy during that period, carbon and pollution dropped almost imperceptibly (p 208)

Makower also has some timeless advice about the greater meaning of business: maintain your passion and activism, refuse to betray your values for economic gain. In other words, don’t lose your soul in the name of sales. He also has lots of cool tools to either demonstrate our progress or help make a case for better business practices, such as the CRED formula (pp. 180-188) and 10 reasons why green business is here to stay (pp. 236-239).

Even employees pretty far down the food chain can have enormous impact; it was apparel buyer Carol Rose who got then-Walmart CEO Lee Scott interested in selling enviro-friendly products when she bought and rapidly sold 190,000 organic cotton yoga outfits (p. 139). While activists will still find fault with its labor practices, supply policies, and store siting, the company has gone on to be a leader in many green business fronts, selling more organic food than Whole Foods and getting many of its suppliers to redo their product packaging along sustainable lines.

Joel Makower Responds:
“I will push back a little on your contention that companies are now talking vociferously (my word, not yours) about their green achievements. I can assure you that this is still very much an arena where the overwhelming majority of companies are walking way more than they’re talking. It’s a sore spot among nearly all the Chief Sustainability Officers I know at big companies. They can’t get their Comms departments to let them talk about what they’re doing. So, it really hasn’t changed all that much.”

The Clean and Green Club, December 2015

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, December 2015
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Do you have five minutes to help me better understand and serve your green/social change business needs? Please fill out this quick survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/9NHHMQ8

Now Through the End of the Year: Print Editions of Two of Shel’s Best Books (and an award-winning novel by his wife) for Just $4.95 per Copy


Perfect holiday gifts for the entrepreneurs, managers, marketers, and business students in your life—and for your own personal library. Also great to buy in bulk and donate to your favorite educational institutions and charities.
Nobody has to know that you only paid $4.95 each (plus shipping) for these award-winning and classy books from respected publishers. Grassroots Marketing: Getting Noticed in a Noisy World (Foreword Magazine Book of the Year Finalist)(Chelsea Green) retails for $22.95, and Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green (Independent Publisher Magazine Groundbreaking Indie Book)(John Wiley & Sons) retails for $21.95.

My wife, award-winning novelist D. Dina Friedman, decided to join the fun and make one of her novels available at the same price (and hers is a hardback!). Playing Dad’s Song, published by Farrar, Strauss, and Giroux, tells the story of a boy who faces crises ranging from a school bully to the death of his father in 9/11, and finds his way back to his center through music. It’s perfect for kids aged 9-15.

Because we’ve recently taken the rights to these books back, you can have print editions of these critically acclaimed books for less than a quarter of their original prices. Sometimes, there is more power in spreading a message widely, and low prices can make that happen. Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green, especially—with its message of business success through green and ethical business practices—has a role to play in changing the culture, and I want to see that change ignite.

The holidays are coming and everyone loves easy, frugal, useful gift ideas. (Note: if you’d like to be more generous, the gift of a strategic green/social change profitability consultation or copywriting project from me could be life-changing.)

Read more about these amazing books at
http://www.guerrillamarketinggoesgreen.com/ (Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green) CODE: 4.95guerrillabook
http://frugalmarketing.com/gmtoc.shtml (Grassroots Marketing). CODE: 4.95gmbook (it comes with a two-chapter update covering social media, no extra charge)
http://ddinafriedman.com/dinas-books/playing-dads-song/ (Playing Dad’s Song) CODE: 4.95pdsbook

Then visit http://shelhorowitz.com/shels-green-products-and-services/ to place your order. Make sure to use the proper coupon codes.

Note: Paperback only; ebook editions are available at the usual undiscounted price (still a great value). Quantities are limited to what we have in stock. If you’re interested in a bulk purchase, let’s talk. If you’d like your books signed and inscribed, please tell us what to say.

This Month’s Tip: Do You Make Yourself Clear, Part 1
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I was scouting my library for the next book to review and spotted a title by one of the world’s most prominent green economists. Great, I thought—until I started reading.

When I review a book in this newsletter, I read it all the way through. By the second paragraph, I was stumbling over so many obtuse sentences, I knew I wasn’t going to be able to tolerate 300 pages of this. The language was so ponderous, it felt almost like reading a foreign tongue. And I have a degree in communications, am trained in journalism, and I’m an avid reader, reading at least four and as many as 12 books each month of 2015.

Authors of nonfiction generally want to communicate and convince.

Yet, if this book is written too thickly for me, imagine trying to convince a tradesperson who reads two or three novels a year that the message of this book is worth all the work.

Here’s a 111-word excerpt from the paragraph that convinced me not to bother reading the book (it continues for another four lines):

The power of the concept of sustainable development is that it both reflects and evokes a latent shift in our vision of how the economic activities of human beings are related to the natural world—an ecosystem which is finite, non-growing, and materially closed. The demands of these activities on the containing ecosystem for regeneration of raw material “inputs” and absorption of waste “outputs” must, I will argue, be kept at ecologically sustainable levels as a condition of sustainable development. This shift is resisted by most economic and political institutions, which are founded on traditional quantitative growth and legitimately fear its replacement by something as subtle and challenging as qualitative development.

The problem isn’t just a matter of sentence length, but that’s a piece of it. Jamming three long sentences together with no break is certainly part of the problem. Long paragraphs compound the situation. I would have started a new paragraph with “This shift.”


But the biggest problem is the convoluted, meandering thought process. A good edit could easily fix this. To prove the point, I’ve rewritten his first sentence (dropping the word count from 44 words to 22):

Sustainable development’s true power is the way it anchors human economic activities to the natural world—a finite, stable, and closed ecosystem.


You can still get a complex message across with simple, understandable language; you don’t have to talk down to your reader. Consider these two paragraphs:

When you look deeply, a lot of the causes of hunger, poverty, war, violence, and catastrophic climate change turn out to be about resources: who uses how much, whether they’re taken sustainably, how fairly they’re distributed. When we address resources systemically, we’re able to transform hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war and violence into peace, and catastrophic climate change into planetary balance.

We actually know how to do this. Passive-energy construction expert David Bainbridge estimates that not only can we reduce the typical building’s energy footprint by 90 percent on new construction, but we can even cut the footprint on existing buildings by 50 to 70 percent. We knew how to build near-zero net-energy buildings at least as far back as 1983, when Amory Lovins built his house. We understand how to significantly increase crop yields without using chemicals and without compromising quality.

I like to think the above excerpt from my forthcoming book Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World takes some pretty complex concepts and makes them understandable—even with sentences of 36 and 38 words. 

Just to be fair, I’ll be the first to acknowledge that my writing could also use tightening. I think my original is easy to understand, but I could have written it even more clearly, starting by knocking seven words out of the first sentence:

Look deeply: hunger, poverty, war, violence, and catastrophic climate change often turn out to be about resources: who uses how much, whether they’re taken sustainably, how fairly they’re distributed.

Finally, one more example (from a different book) of what not to do:

The [name of tool] provides data profiles of four sample generic companies as starter sets with which to initialize the online simulator dashboard and worksheets.

One sentence, and I’m already lost!

Next month, we’ll look at some specific dos and don’ts to keep your writing clear.


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About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriteraward-winning author of ten booksinternational speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.

He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).

“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Hear and Meet Shel

NEW YORK BOOK LAUNCH EVENT for Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World: Green America’s Green Festival—New York, Saturday, April 16, Javits Center. Mainstage talk followed by book signing. This is a great event; I’ve attended several times and this will be my third time speaking. Not just terrific speakers but also great organic food samples and cool products like the wallet and purse vendor who makes stuff out of old tires (I use one of those wallets that I bought there a couple of years ago).


OFFICIAL PUBLICATION DATE FOR Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World is Tuesday, April 19—and Earth Day is Friday, April 22. Expect several more events to be added in April, possibly including a return engagement at Gulf Coast Green in Houston.

WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS BOOK LAUNCH EVENT for Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, Wednesday, April 20, 7 p.m., Odyssey Bookshop, South Hadley. Come early if you want a seat; I’m expecting to fill the room.

SLOW LIVING SUMMIT, Brattleboro, VT, April 28-30 (theme: Food and Agriculture Entrepreneurship), http://www.slowlivingsummit.org/ My talk will be on the 30th: “Impossible is a Dare: How Your Food Business Can Make a Difference on Hunger, Poverty, War, and Catastrophic Climate Change

BOOK EXPO AMERICA, Chicago, May 11-13. Hoping to set up an event either at the show or at a local bookseller.

Preorder your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Release date is April 19, just in time for Earth Day, and you can now preorder from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies from me). Learn all about this powerful book at http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
Friends Who Want to Help

DONNA CUTTING’s new book, 501 Ways to Roll Out the Red Carpet for Your Customers, comes out this week (and includes a little contribution from me). If you’re looking for ways to ‘wow!’ your customers, the book gives you 501 easy-to-implement ideas to inspire loyalty, get new customers, and make a lasting impression.

I recommend 501 Ways to anyone who wants to ‘roll out the red carpet’ for their customers, but feels strapped for time, money, and energy. Power-packed with proven, ready-to-implement action ideas to enhance your customers’ experience and make your life easier. http://redcarpetlearning.com/store/

OSHANA HIMOT (the business coach who has catapulted me exactly where I want to be in creating a career around healing the world) is again offering no-charge consultations (and her phone number has changed. She writes:

“I am a business and life coach and work with people in many fields, assisting them to expand their work. it is unique for each person – the best programs to create, the groups to work with, how to find customers and clients…

I work with people who would like to help create a better society and can benefit from coaching. For a complimentary consultation, call 602-463-6797 or email oshanaben@yahoo.com. Oshana Himot, MBA, CHT”

Another Recommended Book: Evolved Enterprise
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Evolved Enterprise: How to Re-think, Re-imagine & Re-invent Your Business to Deliver Meaningful Impact & Even Greater Profit by Yanik Silver (no publisher named, 2015)

When Yanik Silver sent an advance manuscript of his new book, I liked it so much that I adapted a whole chapter as an essay in my own new book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World. He’s one of four outside contributors.

My enthusiasm is apparently shared by a very influential group. Alongside my blurb, he’s got people like Tony Hsieh (founder of Zappos); John Paul DeJoria (co-founder of Paul Mitchell); and my brilliant friend Sam Horn (author of Tongue Fu and several other excellent books).

It’s focused very strongly on how business can have an impact in the wider world, and makes an excellent complement to Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World. But its focus is quite different; with the exception of the shared chapter, there’s almost no overlap. Although Yanik comes out of the world of big-money Internet marketing, his book has an almost spiritual feel—reinforced by the mandala-like concept wheel that opens several chapters. He even uses the term “Transcending” as the third of the three stages of an evolved enterprise; the others are Transactional and Transformational (pp. 48-56).

He draws many lessons in marketing AND management through his own experience and those of his Maverick and Underground members—as well as thought leaders from Thomas Edison to Richard Branson. Edison, he points out, created an entire ecosystem of his ventures, all of which supported each other (p. 93); in the modern world, Zingerman’s does the same thing, with a bakery supplying bread to the flagship deli, for example (pp. 86-88). Tony Hsieh notes the importance of building a culture—not just hiring for values, but firing over them (p. 185). On the same page, Yanik shares a powerful insight about leverage: “little hinges swing big doors.” And a long guest essay by Joe Mechlinski is just filled with powerful leadership insights (pp. 195-207).

It’s a lot about how the good feeling you have making a difference in the world—and the fun you can have while doing it—translates into measurable bottom-line profits. The fun piece is very important to Yanik, a self-described adventure junkie. There’s a long an honorable tradition around this; he notes that the Dalai Lama has referred to himself as a “professional laugher” (p. 104).

That fun often translates to really creative ideas around building a deep and lasting community, internally and externally. Whether it’s exotic branded swag (such as the green Speedos that have become a part of Yanik’s Maverick brand), a unique collective experience, or even the ability to earn some sort of merit badges, as Harley riders do (pp. 170-171)—these can have vast marketing impact.

Creative marketers, he says, have to fall in love with customers and prospects (p. 160), and to use that love to do the unexpected. I’ve said for years that your real brand is not your slogan, logo, colors, etc., but the prospect/customer’s perception of you. Yanik puts it a bit differently: “It’s what other people are saying about you” (p. 161). This could take the form of genuine caring, such as Zappos not just refunding the purchase when a customer’s husband died in an accident before she could give him the brand new pair of boots she’d bought him, but sending flowers for the funeral! (p. 143).

How do you find ways to inject that creativity and that love? Yanik offers not only the usual tools, but also “community decoders” such as origin stories, in-group lingo and rituals, creeds, barriers to participation, sharing the inside story, artifacts, exceptional experiences, AND a higher purpose (pp. 163-180).

He looks quite a bit about the choices we business owners can make in our consumer role. Example: choosing to hire a firm that employs disadvantaged workers to fill goodie bags for a conference (p. 50).

And much of the work is backed up with rock-solid numbers that validate our choices to use our businesses to do good in the world. I knew about Patagonia’s Don’t Buy This Jacket” campaign and mention it in my new book. But I didn’t know that the company’s sales leapfrogged 40 percent in the next two years (pp. 150-151). He has numbers for many of the best known case studies of social entrepreneurship and business creativity.

It would be nice if we could find these numbers easily. Unfortunately, Evolved Enterprise doesn’t have an index, although it has several blank pages at the back where one could have gone. It also could have used a better interior design and one more proofread. Despite these minor flaws, this book crams a lot of wisdom in, breaks it up with a lot of humor and visual concept examples, and could knock years off your social entrepreneurship learning curve. I recommend it strongly, and especially in tandem with my own Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World.

The Clean and Green Club, June 2014

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, 

June 2014

Learn with Shel from the Comfort of Your Own Phone:
“Virtual Intensive” on Green Marketing and Creating a Better World
Six group calls with Shel—at a very affordable price.


If you are seriously interested in this training, I want to make sure to design something you’ll be happy with. Please take the short survey at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/9Y538SN and be part of the process. It should take you between 2 and 5 minutes
.
Nominate a Business-Change-the-World Project at Business for a Better World
Do you have a favorite cause around turning hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war and poverty into peace, or climate catastrophe into planetary balance? I’m starting a directory of social change projects that businesses can get involved with, at http://www.business-for-a-better-world.com/ (you’ll see a link labeled Nominate, near the top of the home page.) This is your chance to be among the first to put up a project, and be more likely to attract attention. Let’s get some GREAT projects up there! No cost to list—but the submissions are moderated, so don’t bother spamming it.
This Month’s Profile:
Hawthorne Valley Farm

Here’s a community that combines top organic and Biodynamic farming practices, education, social action, and the arts: Hawthorne Valley Farm, in New York State’s Hudson Valley.

I heard Martin Ping, Hawthorne Valley’s Executive Director, at the Slow Living Summit in Brattleboro, Vermont last week, and decided to share some of his story with you.

Founded in 1972, the 900-acre farm uses Biodynamic agriculture: a vigorous standard developed by the visionary educator Rudolph Steiner, who also created the Waldorf Education movement–that goes far beyond organic into a much deeper relationship with the land.

Hawthorne raises vegetables, grains, chickens, goats, sheep, cows, and pigs. Its store sells raw milk, homemade cheeses, live lacto-fermented sauerkraut and veggies, and home-baked breads made from its own grain. It also distributes its wares through one local and three New York City-based CSA (community supported agriculture) networks, as well as through three of New York City’s farmers markets, including the massive thrice-weekly market at Union Square.

And it packages and wholesales yogurt and quark: a spreadable creme fraiche cheese.

Ping calls these packaged dairy products “our secret weapon. We make yogurt–and people in Atlanta read the container and say, ‘ooh, they’ve got a summer camp.’

Hawthorne Valley’s social action and education/farm apprenticeship programs are fully integrated into the farming operation, as are Waldorf teacher training and numerous visual and performing arts programs. The farm regularly brings in 600 children and teens a year, many of whom inner-city children with no previous exposure to nature.

“We find nine years old is the sweet spot for education. You pull out a carrot and they say, ‘whoa, food comes out of the ground!’ They’re just beginning to see the warts on their parents and teachers, you get them mucking out a stall, taking care of another sentient being–a chicken, a goat, a cow–for the first time in their lives. Kids are not standardized. They’re individual and spiritual,” just like farms.

“They get a sense of the relationships, that it doesn’t magically appear. They make all the food, all the accouterments, they understand. There are 100 pounds of milk in 10 pounds of cheese. Kids get a lesson in economics, in food miles, in the relationships of the whole food system.”

Hawthorne Valley also reaches out to prisoners, immigrant farmers, and veterans, even developing theater works for inmates to perform.

A convergence of factors led to the farm’s founding. As Ping puts it, “At that time, a bunch of farmers and Waldorf teachers were meeting. Farms were being told, get big or get out. Agriculture was being pushed out by agribusiness, the culture was getting lost. And teachers were saying kids had less and less opportunity to interact with the natural world. They mooshed the two themes together.

“They said, let’s buy a farm and decommodify the land. And children will be welcome. ‘We are founding the seed of a living organization: agricultural, artistic, educational. The goal is to become full human beings.’ I get to go to work each day at a place where the goal is to become full human beings!”

The farm’s mission is nothing less than “renewal of society and culture through education, agriculture, arts. It’s a food shed, a watershed. We think of the whole farm as a living organism. Inputs and outputs should stay on the farm.

“Farmers grow soil [through manure and compost]; soil grows plants. We’ve been ‘making good shit since 1972.’ I hear people talking about hedge funds. We plant hedges and watch them grow: bird and insect habitat.

“Our disconnection is at the root of every crisis we face. We’re not displaced, we’re DEplaced. This is what we’re doing at Hawthorne Valley: that healing, that connection, that sense of higher purpose.”

The farm also has a Center for Social Research, which explores Rudolph Steiner’s ideas on how society can be organized, and another research arm studying eco-friendly farmscapes. It supports a microlending program and a two-year Waldorf teacher training program that “looks at art in relation to social life and to money, to supporting it freely and decommodifying it.”

And this has far-reaching implications, both in and beyond Hawthorne Valley’s own bioregion: “We’re starting to see Columbia County as a farming organism, not just to our own borders. We’re growing farmers. 65 new farms in Columbia County, they did profiles, put pictures in every library. One of our farmers got those 65 new farmers and some others together for a one-day charette. We had 75 and had to turn some away. They look at practical things, like how to share equipment.

Despite his zeal, Pink is remarkably nonjudgmental. “Even the multinationals are filled with good people, and we need to help them help us. People at Johnson & Johnson [makers of hand sanitizers, among many other products] understand what we’ve lost in the rush to sanitize everything.”

Where else to Hear & Meet Shel
(beyond the Virtual Intensive)
Making Green Sexy,” SolarFest, Tinmouth, VT, USA, July 18-20:
Saturday, July 19th, 2014, 1:30 to 2:30 PM, Workshop Tent #2

Discussions in process about several other possible talks. Remember: You can earn a generous commission if you book Shel into a paid speaking engagement.


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About Shel & This Newsletter

As a marketing consultant and copywriter… award-winning author of eight books… international speaker, blogger, syndicated columnist — Shel Horowitz shows how green and ethical businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green competitors. His most recent book is category bestseller Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet. Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company

He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).

“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Another Recommended Book—The Business Solution to Poverty

The Business Solution to Poverty: Designing Products and Services for Three Billion New Customers by Paul Polak and Mal Warwick (Berrett-Koehler, 2013)

Several years ago, I reviewed The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid, a remarkable book about improving people’s lives at the very bottom while monetizing that improvement in the form of business profit. The Business Solution to Poverty picks up where “Fortune” left off.

Based not on academic theory but on real-world hands-on experience starting such companies in places like Bangladesh, Polak and Warwick say there’s a great deal of money to be made serving the world’s very poorest inhabitants: 2.7 billion people living on $2 per day or less. 
However, it’s not a mater of just walking in and rolling up your sleeves. Succeeding in these markets–plural, because conditions and cultures vary widely in different parts of the world, or even different parts of a single country–requires extensive research, following key design and economic principles, and DEEP understanding of the local cultures. 
Products must be items that people with almost no discretionary income will pay for and use, because these will better their lives, directly and rapidly. They must be durable…extremely cheap to manufacture…designed so a non-literate population can use AND maintain them…and systematically deliverable to places with no roads, no infrastructure, and no tradition of buying from the outside. And they have to both fit well enough into the existing culture and be disruptive enough to dramatically improve people’s lives. 
Examples? 
  • Treadle pumps that can be installed for $25 including the cost of drilling a well 
  • Ceramic water filters 
  • An ultra-low-cost warmer for premature babies 
  • Artificial knees that cost $75 instead of many thousands. 
The authors cite numerous failures, many at the hands of governments or NGOs who, in the authors’ view, don’t scale up enough to make a big difference because they lack the profit motive and thus have less need to make sure their projects actually WORK on the ground. Private businesses, including those run by the authors, have had their failures too–but their batting averages tend to be higher, especially if they do plan for scale. Polak and Warwick say successful businesses will talk to at least 100 customers before going forward–and this research may lead to creative marketing strategies such as theatrical presentations, in situations where traditional Global North media won’t work. If people can’t read, the newspaper will not tell them about you. If they have no electricity, then marketing on radio, TV, or online won’t work very well. Aware of the marketing challenges, Polak and Warwick list “aspirational branding” as a crucial ingredient.
The chances of success are highest, the authors say, when the ventures address basic core needs: energy, water, health care, and jobs (oddly, food is not on their list)–and when there’s accountability. They are critical of many microloan programs, for instance, because they often see the money diverted away from seeding a business (a long-term approach that lifts people out of poverty) and into basic survival–and then the money is gone and there is no business to funnel in capital. 
I agree with almost all their numerous success principles in these challenging markets. However, they make–and I question–the assertion that successful businesses must be able to scale up within the first decade to 100 million units and $10 billion in revenues per year in order to be worthwhile. While I recognize that a systematized, replicable infrastructure capable of those numbers is a good thing, I also do believe there is a place for the smaller venture that might be working in just one or two communities, yet still makes a real difference in people’s lives. And a place for the entrepreneur who still wants to make a difference but wants to stay small. 
To make this whole thing concrete, Polak is starting or consulting to four specific businesses that meet the authors’ criteria: 
  • A bicycle-delivered safe drinking water company 
  • A low-carbon biofuel made from agricultural waste that in the past had been burned without capturing the energy 
  • Solar-powered LED lanterns that are safer, cheaper, and more effective than kerosene lamps–and pay for themselves in the savings of a few months’ supply of kerosene 
  • Door-to-door health education and sales of franchised high-impact health products that protect against malaria, diarrhea, and worms