Category Archive for Friends Who Want to Help

The Clean and Green Club, February 2017

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Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, February 2017
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This Month’s Tip: Cautions in Setting Up a Social Entrepreneurship Venture

An entrepreneur asked on a discussion list for “best ideas to apply entrepreneurial skills to social enterprise” for a social entrepreneurship bootcamp in Taiwan. Since I’ve spent the last two months showing you how to move forward with social entrepreneurship, I thought you’d benefit to see some of the caution flags, too. Here’s the relevant part of my response:

The earlier a company can build in holistic thinking, the better. I see way too many would-be social entrepreneurs go off half-baked on a poorly conceived project that can actually make the situation worse on the ground. For example, many people jump into the famous Buy One Give One model without thinking through the effect on the pre-existing local economy in the target developing area. It has to be done in ways that don’t undermine the struggling local entrepreneurs. Others create something very dependent on continued input from the developed-nation partner but don’t create the structures to make sure that input IS in fact continued.

I see it as a strength that you want to include marketing, and that your vision of marketing includes storytelling. Social entrepreneurship companies are uniquely positioned to benefit by telling the right story to the right people. I do think some of the pieces you’ve identified may want to wait until the organizations are more established, and that the format should be interactive and not pure lecture.

You may find it helpful to view the ways I bring this material to an audience, by viewing my TEDx talk, http://www.ted.com/tedx/events/11809 (click “event videos”) or my 4-minute demo reel, which is footage from this year and somewhat more evolved: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tooSVbHQ5Ik You would definitely benefit from my 10th book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World—and you can download a sampler at no cost at http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world

If your situation is similar to this entrepreneur’s, here are some other cautions to consider:

  • Will it be economically viable? Without profit or a funding source, all the good in the world will be undercut by the need to close before completion, leaving people frustrated and enraged as the progress they’d made disappeared.
  • Can your project be developed without enormous expenditures of resources, time, and money?
  • Do you have buy-in from locals on the ground that will partner with you?
  • Will the project sustain itself using local managers once you’ve moved on?

There are many more questions you should ask yourself. This list will get you started, and then keep asking questions like “and then what happens?” or even the marketer’s question, “so what?”

Again, I’m happy to help you think this through. It’s one of the things I do as a consultant to social change and environmental businesses.

New on the Blog
Just because I haven’t shared with you some of my recent blog posts in months doesn’t mean I’m not blogging regularly. I’ve put up 23 new posts since October 1, or about six new ones per month as of early February. Several I’m particularly proud of (not in chronological order)—note that one post is in more than one category:

Changing the World through Business
The Most Important Question to Create Eco-Friendly Technological Leaps

New Uses for CO2? Elkington’s Latest Out-Front Thinking

$10 Million to Charity—Another Cheer for Patagonia!

When Does Social Change Work Become a “Calling”?

Marketing/Customer Service
Will Budweiser’s Gamble Pay Off? (analysis of the company’s immigration-themed Superbowl ad)

Why I’ve Boycotted My Neighborhood Theater Since 1969

A committed author is always looking for book promotion opportunities

And THIS is Why Trump Won!

The Election and its Aftermath
George Lakey: DT’s Repression is a Huge Opportunity for the Movement (if you pick just one article on the blog, make it this one)

I DID Give Him a Chance…And That’s Why I March

And THIS is Why Trump Won!

10 Reasons to Resist Nonviolently, Chanukah, And Barbara Kingsolver’s Message

Friends Who Want to Help
JV Crum III, who has twice featured me on his Conscious Millionaire Podcast, turned a recent diagnosis of diabetes into a way to help others. Not only has he cut his blood sugar in half in just two weeks (and without insulin treatments), but he’s changed the focus of his series to “From Diabetes to Healthy and Thriving Entrepreneur.

If you’ve been around the independent publishing community for any length of time, you probably know the name Deltina Hay. Here’s her latest project: Elearning Delta is a full-service elearning solutions company, specializing in innovative course development and custom learning management systems. The Elearning Delta team can produce your elearning project from the ground up, providing full production services all the way through your ecommerce solution. (http://elearningdelta.com)

Hear and Meet Shel
I’ll be one of the featured experts on the Monetise Your Passion Summit with Rita Joyan, February 13-March 5. That’s not a typo; she’s Australian. In fact, she was named Canberra’s Young Business Woman of The Year for 2015. Canberra, you might know, is Australia’s capital. And I’m especially excited because the other experts are not the same old same old. I’ll be learning for the first time from people like:
  • Stephanie Leigh Mulac – how to build 6-7 figure businesses
  • David Essel –  known as The new leader of the positive thinking movement.
  • Jesse Brisendine – founder of the 1 year 1000  challenge
  • Ally Laporte – radio personality and parenting expert  – her radio program has 6 million listeners.

I have several other interviews scheduled but don’t yet have their air dates:

  • With Internet marketer Willie Crawford
  • On the Positive Phil podcast “interviewing entrepreneurs and positive people” (I’m both)
  • With Kymm Nelsen on the Conscious Business Weekly podcast
  • With Alyssa Wright on the Leading Change podcast
  • Business Code Podcast with Karina Crooks
  • Game Changers with Lisa Faulkner

And shortlisted/in negotiation with meeting planners at several other events, but none are definite yet. Possibilities include Chicago and Rapid City, South Dakota, among others.

I’ll be moderating two panels at Ethical Corporation’s 5th Responsible Business Summit NY taking place on March 27-28 2017 at the Brooklyn Marriott Hotel.

The Summit offers three focused tracks all shaped to uncover the REAL potential for CSR to drive profit, accelerate growth and change culture. Over 200 major-corporation delegates will attend to hear 45+ senior level speakers. And I’ve arranged to save you $200 on the conference fee. Just use the code, MP200, when you register at http://events.ethicalcorp.com/rbs-usa/register.php

How Social Entrepreneurs Can Thrive in the New Political Climate: webinar put on by Green America (my fourth for them), Thursday, April 29, 1 pm ET/10 am PT.

I missed Book Expo America last year after attending every one since 1997. But it’s back in NYC and my daughter is NOT getting married the following week (as she did in 2016), so I expect to be attending (May 30-June 2). If there’s interest, perhaps we can organize a gathering.

Order your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Find out more and order from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies directly from me). http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
 
Download a free sampler with several excerpts, the complete Table of Contents and Index, and all the endorsements.
Another Recommended BookPeople Shock
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People Shock: The Path to Profits When Customers Rule by Tema Frank

It’s been a really long time since I’ve reviewed a customer service book in this space. While I love writing about deep sustainability, occasionally I will revisit the basics and review a book on customer service, marketing, or general leadership. As a marketer, I see customer service and leadership as part of marketing. Get customer service wrong, and it doesn’t matter how brilliant your ads and messaging on, how clever your company colors—you’re toast.

This is a nicely written book by someone who was a corporate insider and moved into independent consulting for companies in desperate need of better customer service. And as we all know, a whole lot of companies could benefit from some coaching and consulting on that end.

Frank builds her book around a simple formula:

Promise + People + Process = Profit

She breaks this down, with at least one chapter on each of the 3 Ps on the left side of the equals sign.The promise is what the brand is really about: what your company stands for, its higher purpose.

People, of course, refers to the human factor: treat your workers well, make them feel like valued players, give them enough responsibility to take initiative and make customers happy. And in turn, they will be loyal, productive, and creative, willing to help you achieve greatness by making your customers feel great.

But even the best team will not be able to help you if you fail on process. Staff can be super-friendly and helpful, but if the system just doesn’t work, you’ll still take a hit on the bottom line.

Meanwhile, the companies that do customer service well, like Nordstrom and (in her view) Amazon, are raising the bar. At the same time, and social media provides a forum to massively amplify consumer complaints; she cites the infamous “United Breaks Guitars” video (which I also cite in my own latest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World)—and points out that United failed to learn from that debacle.

Some of her other many good points:

  • Customer-focused companies outperformed the S&P 500 by 5 times (p. 29)
  • Examine your “defector pipeline” to find ways to stop the loss (p. 62)
  • Only break your brand promise if you’re willing to break your brand (p. 67)
  • A bad apology can make things worse; a good, sincere apology—backed up with proper action—can turn a disgruntled customer into a fan (pp. 67-72); base apologies in “humility, transparency, and a desire to learn” (pp. 285-286)
  • Act on employee ideas immediately when feasible (p. 119)
  • Remember your existing customers, who are too-often neglected even though they’re more profitable than new business (I’ve written about this as well)(p. 148)
  • Make sure your frontline staff can access ALL the information about problems and solutions (p. 159)—and welcome their input on better ways to address various issues; even think about honoring your employees in “mistake of the week” meetings (p. 204)
  • Understand that fans of yours who recommend you are likely to also recommend your competitors—giving you the opportunity to earn even more referrals as you discover why they recommend others and can earn their trust in those areas (p. 274)

She also has great examples of companies that reinvented one or more of these Ps, with particularly wonderful examples around management. I especially loved learning about Ricardo Semler, head of the Brazilian company Semco, which eliminated practically every aspect of traditional hierarchical management and has grown 40 percent per year.

There’s lots more. If you have a customer service staff, you’ll pick up some great tips from this book.

Recent Interviews & Guest Articles: 

Shel’s done 16 podcasts recently, ranging from 5 minutes to a full hour. Click here to see descriptions and replay links.
Connect with Shel

 

 

Find on Facebook

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of ten books…international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel), his newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, has already won two awards and is endorsed by Jack Canfield and Seth Godin. Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Going Beyond Sustainability, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He’s an International Platform Association Certified Speaker and was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.
He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).
“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

The Clean and Green Club, January 2017

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Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, January 2017
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Happy 2017. May we all come together for a better world. I worry greatly about the future of my country: the US. I recognize that this newsletter goes to people who may have very different politics than mine. I offer these first five paragraphs in a spirit of dialog. Even if you don’t agree with me, as a businessperson who cares enough about social responsibility to be on my list, you need to have a sense of what’s going on in your logical market. But if you really don’t want to know this, skip down to this month’s tip.

But I take hope in knowing that the power of social movements is stronger than the power of governments. We will continue to work for the environment, for social justice, for better conditions for all, and for a climate where bullying, misogyny, and racism are no longer acceptable—and I hope you join me.

Thus, my wife and I will be marching in the streets of Washington, DC on January 21, holding the new president’s feet to the metaphorical fire on Inauguration Weekend.

Similar rallies are being held in several major US cities. The Facebook page is https://www.facebook.com/events/2169332969958991/ and you can find one near you at https://www.womensmarch.com/sisters . Although they’re calling it a women’s march, they’ve made it very clear that men are welcome.

One easy specific action you can do if you agree is to Like the Facebook page 3NoTrump. Each week, my wife, daughter, and son-in-law provide three easy but meaningful actions you can do to not stand idly by: phone calls to make with the phone number and a sample script, copy-and-paste emails, that sort of thing. Already, we’ve been able to celebrate victory on a couple of the projects they’ve posted.

This Month’s Tip: How to Choose the Right Social Responsibility Path for Your Particular Business
The best types of CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) activities do all this:

  1. Dovetail closely with your company’s skills, capabilities, interests, and goals
  2. Make a measurable difference in global problems, e.g., turn hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war into peace, and/or catastrophic climate change into planetary balance—ideally, look for strategies that create multiple wins and address multiple goals
  3. Launch profitable products and services
  4. Open possibilities for new marketing initiatives

Helping companies figure this out is part of what I do. If you visit http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/d-i-y-do-it-yourself-resources/ , the first two links are self-assessments—one for social responsibility and one for green practices. Filling either or both out entitles you to 15 minutes of my time, via Skype or similar.

And here’s a real-world example, an excerpt from one of many case studies in my latest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World. To me, this is a “perfect storm of positivity” with wins all around: for the company, the purchaser, the dealer, the community, the environment, and the economy. The references to Polak, Warwick, and Prahalad are all explained earlier in that section.

Let There Be Light

d.light—one of the companies Polak and Warwick mention—simultaneously addresses poverty, education, air pollution/toxic fumes/health risks, energy savings, carbon footprint, and more—and makes a huge difference in lives of those at the bottom of the economic pyramid. All with a simple three-item product line.

Headquartered in San Francisco with additional offices in China, India, and Kenya, d.light sells inexpensive freestanding bright-light LED lanterns with lifetime batteries powered by dual solar/plug-in electric chargers. The company’s mission statement: “to create new freedoms for customers without access to reliable power so they can enjoy a brighter future.”

And to accomplish this mission, the company employs a deeply holistic analysis of the problems faced by people at the bottom of the heap, and how a reliable and renewable source of good light can help solve them.

The lights go into two types of environments: places where light has been supplied by kerosene (or, conceivably, open fires)—and those with no pre-existing night-time light source.

If the lantern replaces an existing kerosene model, it accomplishes many desirable goals: It provides a better quality of light that needs no fuel, does not produce toxic fumes, has no risk of setting the house on fire, reduces pollution, and leaves considerably more money in the hands of the family using the lantern—because the savings over purchasing kerosene typically pay for the lantern in about two months.

Where the lantern provides light in a previously unlit area, the benefits are different, but just as significant: four more hours per day of productive time. Children can advance much further with their studies; cottage industries, farms, and microbusinesses can produce and sell more. In short, the lamp becomes a ladder out of poverty.

Using classic Prahalad-inspired design principles, the units are cheap, extremely durable, and designed for multiple environments. A company video shows the lamps dropped from a high balcony and run over by a car, and still working afterward. At least one of the three models can be mounted on a wall or ceiling. The top-line model can also charge mobile phones. In developing countries, payment plans can be arranged for less than the previous monthly cost of kerosene; in developed countries, 10 percent of the proceeds funds lamps for children who could not buy them. Worldwide, they’re sold with a two-year free-replacement warranty.

Operating 6000 retail outlets in 40 countries, d.light is very successful, both financially and in the social and environmental good it has created. As of February 28, 2013, the company claims:

  • 13,638,438 “lives empowered”
  • 3,409,610 school-aged children reached with solar lighting
  • $275,817,462 saved in energy-related expenses
  • 3,589,490,280 productive hours created for working and studying
  • 656,952 tons of CO2 offset
  • 10,115,224 kWh generated from renewable energy

Build This Kind of Success Into Your Own Business

So how can you build this kind of profitable social change focus into your own business? Start by filling out one or both of those assessments at http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/d-i-y-do-it-yourself-resources/ , and get on the phone with me for 15 minutes at no charge. Wouldn’t you just love to start 2017 with a new focus on profitable social entrepreneurship?

Friends Who Want to Help
Over the past three years, I’ve worked closely with a remarkable business coach who has helped me wrap myself around the idea of thinking so big as to turn hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war into peace, and catastrophic climate change into planetary balance.

As I do once in a while, I’m sharing a note from her. Just because working with her has been transformational for me and might be for you. I am not compensated for any referrals to her. Doing this just to help her—and you.

“I work as a business and life coach and a Certified Hypnotherapist. Working on your goals and letting go of the thoughts and feelings no longer helpful to you assists you to move forward in your life and work and create wellbeing for yourself and for others. You can do these separately or combine them together. To see how they can assist you to go forward, call Oshana Himot, MBA, CHT, at 602-463-6797 or email oshanaben at yahoo.com ”

Hear and Meet Shel
I’ll be one of the featured experts on the Monetise Your Passion Summit with Rita Joyan, February 13-March 5. That’s not a typo; she’s Australian. In fact, she was named Canberra’s Young Business Woman of The Year for 2015. Canberra, you might know, is Australia’s capital. And I’m especially excited because the other experts are not the same old same old. I’ll be learning for the first time from people like:
  • Stephanie Leigh Mulac – how to build 6-7 figure businesses
  • David Essel –  known as The new leader of the positive thinking movement.
  • Jesse Brisendine – founder of the 1 year 1000 challenge
  • Ally Laporte – radio personality and parenting expert  – her radio program has 6 million listeners.

Look for a solo mailing about this with the full details around February 5, once I have them to share with you.

Also look for these upcoming podcasts (details when I have them):

  • With Internet marketer Willie Crawford
  • On the Positive Phil podcast “interviewing entrepreneurs and positive people” (I’m both)
  • With Kymm Nelsen on the Conscious Business Weekly podcast
  • With Alyssa Wright on the Leading Change podcast

I also expect to be moderating at least one panel at Ethical Corporation’s Responsible Business Summit in New York, March 27-28: http://events.ethicalcorp.com/rbs-usa/conference-agenda.php

And shortlisted/in negotiation with meeting planners at several other events, but none are definite yet. Possibilities include Chicago and Rapid City, South Dakota, among others.

I missed Book Expo America last year after attending every one since 1997. But it’s back in NYC and my daughter is NOT getting married the following week (as she did in 2016), so I expect to be attending (May 30-June 2). If there’s interest, perhaps we can organize a gathering.

Order your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Find out more and order from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies directly from me). http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
 
Download a free sampler with several excerpts, the complete Table of Contents and Index, and all the endorsements.
Another Recommended BookBorn on Third Base

Born on Third Base by Chuck Collins (Chelsea Green, 2016)

One-percenter Chuck Collins, an heir to the Oscar Meyer fortune who went to prep school with Mitt Romney, has written a dramatic and well-penned book on why wealthy people will benefit from getting out of their isolation bubble and getting down and dirty in social change organizing. It’s a great read, and a very provocative one—and it includes reader-friendly features including a resources list, detailed notes, and a thorough index (yay!). His primary audience is the wealthy themselves, with a secondary audience among organizers who would like to enlist one-percenters to work in and/or fund their efforts.

And he walks his talk. He gave away his own fortune, and he’s been community organizing on class and climate issues for more than 30 years.

Collins says many of the one percent are actually disadvantaged by their wealth. It binds them to a set of conventions and isolates them from meaningful community in the wider world. When he had a fire, the neighbors from the trailer park he’d organized came over with casseroles and offers of help. When he needs access to a tool, he can often borrow it. He notes that this kind of gift economy is additive, not zero-sum. Generosity creates more generosity; there are no losers if it’s done with balance and good intention.

But the wealthy, isolated in mansions within “gated communities and gated hearts,” don’t often experience those resilient and vibrant relationships. When they can buy whatever they want, they don’t bother to tap into those community resources. When the civic infrastructure fails them, they have the luxury to opt out and take advantage of for-profit private-sector alternatives—while the poor have to either suffer or agitate for change. Collins suggests instead that the wealthy stay and fight, “be the squeaky wheel,” and get results for the entire community. As an example, he organized to improve conditions at the local municipal swimming pool, rather than fleeing with his family to a private country club. He suggests forming “resilience circles” that build deep community while addressing neighborhood (and global) issues—and urges wealthy allies to tell their stories.

Wealthy people also have the resources to address systemic change through the economic system. As his late colleague Felice Yeskel said, they can work at “the intersection of personal change and system rewiring.” Collins is heavily involved in the climate movement, and he quotes a study showing that superior attention to climate risk correlates well with superior financial metrics. Thus, wealthy investors can choose to invest in conscious businesses. And the socially responsible investment sector is growing exponentially.

The one percent, he notes, is not a monolith. He divides the sector into five “neighborhoods”: substrata of class, ranging from “Affluentville,” with incomes in the $680,000 to $3 million range, on up to “Billionaireville,” a rarified enclave of just 540 households at the very top.

Many of those in the lower strata of the upper class are reachable, he says. Once they see the disconnect between their lives and the lives of others, once they understand the benefits that accrue by replacing purchasing power with real community, once they realize that when others climb out of poverty, it is not an attack on them—they will join and stay involved as long as they’re treated as human beings with something valuable to offer, and not just as either a human ATM machine or a target for class anger. He quotes social change theorist Gar Alperovitz: “You learn by engagement, not by hanging back.

And it’s in those risk-taking leaps that we find the excitement, the meaning of life.”

After more than 40 years of organizing and marketing for social and environmental change, a lot of his points were familiar to me. But one that wasn’t was his shocking chapter on charitable giving. Apparently, many family foundations are basically a way to scam out of paying taxes and do very little genuine charitable work. And this is part of how 22 percent of wealth now devolves to the one percent (most of it to the top 1/10 of 1 percent), more than doubling the 9 percent figure of 1978.

Collins is not anti-capitalist. But he distinguishes generative (healthy) capitalism from degenerative (unhealthy) manifestations. He shows numerous examples of how the wealth can make a difference day to day, and how wealthy people can grapple with their own issues around wealth. The book ends very powerfully, with his story of going back to his childhood community of Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, and discovering that he still had friends there whom he could turn into allies—he didn’t have to be alienated from others in the one percent just because he was working full-tine on social change and had given away his fortune.

And on the very last page, he shares an amazing metaphor: “Our job is to serve as hospice workers for the old world, the old story…and midwives to the new world, the new story.”

Disclosure: Chuck Collins and I lived in the same social change community in 1980-81. I didn’t know him well, but we traveled in the same circles.

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Recent Interviews & Guest Articles: 

Shel’s done 16 podcasts recently, ranging from 5 minutes to a full hour. Click here to see descriptions and replay links.
Connect with Shel


 

Find on Facebook

 

 

 

 

 

About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of ten books…international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.
He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).
“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

The Clean and Green Club, May 2016

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, May 2016
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This Month’s Tip: Words I Don’t Use
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Vocabulary is an important thing; it’s part of framing. I do believe that the words we use influence the outcomes we get. I want to share with you a few choice words and phrases that I either avoid altogether or use only to make a point—and yes, I recognize the irony that I’m dedicating my entire feature article to them—but only as a teaching exercise.

Sustainable/Sustainability: These words are everywhere in the green business world. But they talk about staying where we are. My vision takes us well beyond the status quo to a world that’s actively healing itself—reversing catastrophic climate change, turning hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war into peace.

Global Warming: Oh, it sounds so warm and comfortable and fuzzy and tender! While I don’t spend a lot of time jumping up and down about the need to change human patterns that influence climate—preferring to use the power of enlightened self interest to effect change, rather than guilt and shame—when I do, I refer to “catastrophic climate change.”

Killing It/Crushing It: I’m not interested in killing or crushing things, people, or organizations. I don’t see my success as require anyone else’s failure. I can thrive without hurting others, and you can too.

Niggardly: While I’ve looked at the origins of both words and they actually have nothing in common linguistically, I will never use that term other than to say why I don’t use it—because it sounds far too close to a nasty word to describe black people, and I don’t want to put out any kind of racist vibe.

Sucks (as a negative descriptor): This one came into use decades ago as an anti-gay-male slur, derived from a longer word that begins with “c.” ‘Nuff said.

Gendered pronouns to represent all people: I work toward gender-neutral language. Sometimes, because it’s easier than saying “he or she” or “his or her,” I’ll alternate. The first paragraph might use she and her, while the next switches to he, his, and him. Or I’ll write a paragraph in the plural, using words like “people,” “they,” and “their”—but grammatically, this requires that everything else is plural too. It’s not a construction I use often.

That’s Impossible: This is a special case, because actually I use this one in my speeches, writing, and media interviews—but I use it to prove its opposite. I talk about “impossible” as “the red flag in front of the bull,” defying me to prove it wrong. My most popular (and I think best) presentation is called “Impossible is a Dare” and it builds from this magnificent quote by Muhammad Ali:

“Impossible is just a big word thrown around by small men who find it easier to live in the world they’ve been given than to explore the power they have to change it. Impossible is not a fact. It’s an opinion. Impossible is not a declaration. It’s a dare. Impossible is potential. Impossible is temporary. Impossible is nothing.”

I use that same quote as a chapter title in my 10th book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, and as the theme for my most popular talk. I feel similarly about Can’t.

What are your banished words and phrases?

(With thanks to Marilyn Jenett and George Lakoff)

Order your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Find out more and order from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies directly from me). http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
Shel Interviews Thought Leaders
Michael Shuman, author of The Local Economy Solution, is the first person I’ve interviewed for a new series with thought leaders in enviro-friendly and/or transformational business. Michael talks about why most conventional economic development makes no sense and what to do instead. http://transformpreneur.com/2016/04/08/michael-schuman-why-most-economic-development-programs-are-a-disaster/
Hear and Meet Shel
GUEST ON THE ENRICHMENT HOUR WITH MIKE SCHWAGER, Thursday, May 19, 7 p.m. ET/4 p.m. PT http://wsradio.com/category/lifestyles/the-enrichment-hour-with-mike-schwager/ (and archived on that link afterward)

INTERVIEW WITH DR. WAYNE DORBAND OF ECOLONOMICS.COM via blab.im, Friday, May 20, 8:30 a.m. ET/5:30 a.m. PT (log on to blab and search for one of our names)

WEBINAR FOR INDEPENDENT PUBLISHERS OF NEW ENGLAND, “Green Audiences, Green Titles, Green Printing” Thursday, May 26, 6 p.m. ET/3 p.m. PT https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7842561726385736194
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About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of ten books…international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.

He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).

“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

Recent Interviews & Guest Articles:
Western Massachusetts Business Show with Ira Bryck, http://whmp.com/podcasts/western-mass-business-show-4-9-16/ Profiles of several companies that were founded to good in the world. Green companies as price leaders. How to get a copy of my $9.95 ebook, Painless Green: 111 Tips to Help the Environment, Lower Your Carbon Footprint, Cut Your Budget, and Improve Your Quality of Life—With No Negative Impact on Your Lifestyle at no cost.
 
Bill Newman: http://whmp.com/podcasts/the-101-best-dingers-in-baseball/ (segment starts at 28:28): A quick, intense 11-minute trip through the highlights of my work

Ask those Branding Guys: http://santafe.com/thevoice/podcasts/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world (segment starts at 9:23)
 
 
Todd Schinck, Intrepid Now, with a nice emphasis on the power of ordinary people to change the world: http://intrepidnow.com/authors/shel-horowitz-combining-principles-profits-grow-business-heal-world/ (segment starts at 2:28)

JV Crum, Conscious Millionaire, second interview: We cover my first activist moment at age 3, how I helped save a mountain, the next big environmental issue, and how a simple vow in my 20s changed my life http://consciousmillionaire.com/shelhorowitz2/ (segment starts at 3:25)

Jill Buck, Go Green Radio: http://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/92012/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world (segment starts at 0:52). The difference between socially responsible and socially transformative businesses, impact of a social agenda on employees, urban farming, new energy technologies…and a cool case study of how a dog groomer could green up.

Kristie Notto, Be Legendary: The perfect example of a business that addresses social issues, the hidden revenue model I showed a social entrepreneur, how a famous gourmet food company went head-to-head with a much larger competitor, what we can learn about engineering from nature, and why wars are solvable http://traffic.libsyn.com/belegendarypodcast/Be_Legendary_Podcast_-_Shel_Horowitz_for_itunes.mp3 

Guest on Leon Jay, Socialpreneurtv http://socialpreneur.tv/building-better-products/guerilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world (you’ll get to see what I look like when I’m overdue for a haircut/beard trim—a rare glimpse at Shaggy Shel)
 
Two-part interview on Steve Sapowksy’s excellent EcoWarrior Radio podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/pt.-1-guerrilla-marketing/id1080237490?i=363550688&mt=2/ (Listen to Part 1 before Part 2, of course)

The first of two excellent shows on Conscious Millionaire http://consciousmillionaire.com/shelhorowitz/
Another Recommended Book: The Responsible Company
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The Responsible Company: What We’ve Learned From Patagonia’s first 40 Years, by Yvon Chouinard and Vincent Stanley (Patagonia Books, 2012)

This thin book—the main text is only 92 pages—is not only crammed with a ton of great information (I took four dense pages of notes—more than I often do on books of 300 pages), but it’s also a joy to read. The book is extremely reader-friendly, with such touches as a warm and personal writing style, endnotes that reference the context so you don’t have to keep flipping back and forth, a list of further reading, and a super-comprehensive 12-page index.

Chouinard (Patagonia’s founder) and Stanley (its long-time marketing chief) start by pointing out the places where industrial society falls short:

  • Europe uses three times its share of the world’s resources, while the US consumes seven times its share (p. 19)
  • Rivers have been so dammed and polluted that many enter the seas through dead zones (pp. 19-20)
  • Every time we manufacture “crap,” we consume irreplaceable resources: human intelligence and natural capital (p. 27).

Reacting to humans’ negative impact on nature, Chouinard first manufactured high-quality mountaineering equipment. He started Patagonia as an alternative to sweating over hot metal forges for hours at a time; they saw clothing as both personally and environmentally more benign—until they started looking at the horrible environmental and social costs of chemiculture cotton. This started a journey to make Patagonia the greenest and most socially responsible company it could be, including

  • Switching all cotton to organic way back in 1996
  • Pioneering such employee perks as on-site daycare
  • Starting its famous take-back program for end-of-life products
  • Making sure that any job at the company was meaningful (defined as combining doing what we love and giving back to the world, p. 40)

And they extend this beyond the employee mix to all stakeholders—including the natural world (pp. 29, 32-34). Priding itself in its collaborative relationships with competitors, Patagonia has been instrumental in creating environmental standards for outdoor companies. It participates actively in two major industry trade associations: the Outdoor Industry Association and the Sustainable Apparel Coalition (p. 86). It also sees its customers as partners—and suggests that companies can accomplish a great deal when they romance their customers rather than B.S. them (p. 77).

One of the things I like best about this remarkable book is its overall attitude that doing the right thing not only promotes excellence, but expands our horizons. Without being preachy, the authors scatter aphorisms like

  • “To make a bad product is to do a bad business” (p. 35)
  • “Every time people in the company do something new that was formerly thought impossible, they contribute…to the sense that much will be possible in the future” (p. 40)
  • “The strongest thing your company can do is something no one else will do, or do well” (p. 78)
  • Collaborating industry-wide presents “a confluence of virtue and perceived opportunity” (p. 86).

There’s so much wisdom in this book! I expect to read it every few years. I recommend it heartily.

The Clean and Green Club, April 2016

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, April 2016
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Want to say thank you to me for all my hard work bringing you this newsletter since 1997? 

One way would be to order your copy of Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World by April 18 from Amazon–all sales before the pub date count in figuring out best-seller status, and I’m close to being a category best-seller. Would love to have your help in getting there. The book comes with cool bonuses, too: see http://impactwithprofit.com/giftsforreaders/ . Scroll down and you’ll see a green-tinted box (or plain text if you have HTML turned off) with the order link.

If you would like to do a very small and easy thing to help, consider donating a single automated Tweet and/or Facebook post, pre-written for you. It takes 30 seconds to sign up at https://www.thunderclap.it/projects/40108-business-solves-biggest-issues — just click one or more of those big red buttons.
This Month’s Tip: My Selfish Motivation for a Lifetime of Activism
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You know by now that I’m not only a marketer but a committed activist, working more than 40 years to create a better world. Now, here’s the part you might not know: I put those thousands of hours in, gave all those speeches, wrote all those books, started several movements and organizations—because I’m selfish.

But what differentiates me from, say, Donald Trump or the Koch Brothers (besides their obvious vast wealth and ultraconservative politics) is this:

—>I define making the world better as in my self-interest. I work to make the world better, so I (and my kids, their as-yet-unborn kids, my friends, and those who are suffering currently) can have a better world. That helps me and the people I care about.

It’s looked pretty much like this, going back to age 12 when I really got going with making the world better:


1969-75: peace in Vietnam. Because I didn’t want to go to war when I turned 18. I actually started mentally working on my Conscientious Objector essay when I was about 12. 

1970-present: environment, at least to a limited degree (I helped defeat my first nuclear plant in 1971, before I really knew very much). I thought clean air and clean water were not just nice-to-haves, but have-tos. How to bring them about if not by working for a cleaner environment?

1971-73: high school student rights/multiculturalism at my high school, and oddly enough, a side exploration in the Libertarian Party. Because my rights were at risk. I wanted freedom to dissent as a student, and freedom from draconian laws about things that were really no business of the government.

1973-85: LGB activism (we didn’t know more than a couple of Ts back then). The B part is about me.

1974-81: Safe energy/no nuclear power/no nuclear weapons. Because keeping the world from cataclysm is a part of those environmental have-tos.

1983-98: A lot of community board service on affordable housing, reinventing democracy, a free-form dance collective (the arts have always been part of my social change work), disability rights, and even a board advising the local District Attorney on civil rights issues from various minority perspectives. Worked with my city councilor to create the first nonsmokers’ rights regulations in our area. Also was involved in several mayor and city council races, including three where I ran as a council candidate, one where I managed a successful insurgent campaign (we won by seven votes), and a mayoral race where I wrote all the press releases. Because I wanted a better city and county to live in, and I saw the City Council as constituted in the early 1980s as a very repressive institution that did not represent the wave of new immigrants to town such as myself.

1999-2000: Founded and played key organizing/leadership roles in a group that saved a local mountain in just 13 months (I thought it would take 5 years). And it means that every time I drive by that site (just a mile from my house), I DON’T have to look at ugly houses going all the way up to the ridge line, or sit in traffic as they exit onto the main road.

2002-present: Reinventing the business world as an ethical, environmentally conscious partner in transformational social change
the last two years of it focused on turning hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war into peace, and catastrophic climate change into planetary balance. Because, thinking holistically, making business a partner in bettering the world betters conditions for the people and other critters that live here—and that includes me. And also because business has the resources, technology, and yes, motivation to do this work, where activists are often lacking some of those pieces.

So there you have my true confession: I make the world better, so I can live in a better world. And isn’t that as good a motivation as any?

What’s YOUR motivation to change the world?

Preorder your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Release date is April 19, just in time for Earth Day, and you can now preorder from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies from me). Learn all about this powerful book at http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
Shel Interviews Thought Leaders
Michael Shuman, author of The Local Economy Solution, is the first person I’ve interviewed for a new series with thought leaders in enviro-friendly and/or transformational business. Michael talks about why most conventional economic development makes no sense and what to do instead. http://transformpreneur.com/2016/04/08/michael-schuman-why-most-economic-development-programs-are-a-disaster/
Hear and Meet Shel
Connect with Shel


Find on Facebook


About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriteraward-winning author of ten booksinternational speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.

He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).

“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

NEW YORK BOOK LAUNCH EVENT for Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World: Green America’s Green Festival—New York, TOMORROW, Saturday, April 16, Javits Center. Mainstage talk at 11:30 a.m. followed by book signing. This is a great event; I’ve attended several times and this will be my third time speaking. Not just terrific speakers but also great organic food samples and cool products like the wallet and purse vendor who makes stuff out of old tires (I use one of those wallets that I bought there a couple of years ago).
GUEST ON THE BILL NEWMAN SHOW, WHMP 1400 AM & 96.9 FM, Northampton, MA and online, Monday, April 18, between 9-10 a.m. ET  http://whmp.com/podcasts/shows/bill-newman/

GUEST FOR ASK THOSE BRANDING GUYS, Monday, April 18, 1:15 p.m. ET/10:15 a.m. PT, http://www.santafe.com/thevoice/stream and live over KVSF (101.5 FM) Santa Fe, NM

INTERVIEW WITH TODD SCHNICK, http://intrepidnow.com, airs April 18 (and beyond)

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION DATE FOR Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World is Tuesday, April 19—and Earth Day is Friday, April 22

SECOND OF J.V. CRUM’S TWO INTERVIEWS ON CONSCIOUSMILLIONAIRE.COM, Tuesday, April 19 (almost no overlap between this and the earlier show listed at “recent interviews”) 


AN EXCERPT FROM Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, Brand Identity in a Global Economy, is scheduled to run Tuesday, April 19 at CarolRoth.com

WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS BOOK LAUNCH EVENT for Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, Wednesday, April 20, 7 p.m., Odyssey Bookshop, South Hadley. Come early if you want a seat; I’m expecting to fill the room.


HOW TO BUILD A MOVEMENT: INTERVIEW GUEST FOR KRISTIE NOTTO’S BE LEGENDARY PODCAST (f/k/a Kristie T), Wednesday, April 20, 3 p.m. ET/noon PT, http://awesomesaucemarketing.net/kristie-notto-chats-with-shel-horowitz/

SLOW LIVING SUMMIT, Brattleboro, VT, April 28-30 (theme: Food and Agriculture Entrepreneurship), http://www.slowlivingsummit.org/ My talk will be on the 30th @ 1:30 pm: “Impossible is a Dare: How Your Food Business Can Make a Difference on Hunger, Poverty, War, and Catastrophic Climate Change

GUEST ON THE BARRY MOLTZ SHOW, any time after Sunday, May 1, 6:30 a.m. ET http://barrymoltz.com/business-insanity-talk-radio-with-barry-moltz/

GUEST ON GO GREEN RADIO WITH JILL BUCK, Friday, May 6, noon ET/9 a.m. PT http://www.voiceamerica.com/show/1303/go-green-radio

GUEST ON THE ENRICHMENT HOUR WITH MIKE SCHWAGER, Thursday, May 19, 7 p.m. ET/4 p.m. PT http://wsradio.com/category/lifestyles/the-enrichment-hour-with-mike-schwager/ (and archived on that link afterward)

WEBINAR FOR INDEPENDENT PUBLISHERS OF NEW ENGLAND, “Green Audiences, Green Titles, Green Printing” Thursday, May 26, 6 p.m. ET/3 p.m. PT https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7842561726385736194



Recent Interviews & Guest Articles:

Guest on Leon Jay, Socialpreneurtv http://socialpreneur.tv/building-better-products/guerilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world (you’ll get to see what I look like when I’m overdue for a haircut/beard trim—a rare glimpse at Shaggy Shel)

Western Massachusetts Small Business Show with Ira Bryck http://whmp.com/podcasts/western-mass-business-show-4-9-16/

Friends Who Want to Help
Shift Network presents a telesummit, Earth Day Summit: Renewed Hope, Real Solutions and Reverence for Mother Earth, April 22 (Earth Day).

On April 22, esteemed green experts, spiritual leaders, innovators, activists, scientists and luminaries from around the globe are coming together to offer us all a renewed sense of hope, real solutions and reverence for Mother Earth. Join Starhawk, Kenny Ausubel, Vicki Robin, Chief Phil Lane, Jr., David Crow, Xiuhtezcatl Martinez and others for this no-charge online gathering — and find inspired actions for a healthy, sustainable and thriving planet. http://earthdaysummit.com/

Another Recommended Book: The Earth’s Best Story
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The Earth’s Best Story: A Bittersweet Tale of Twin Brothers Who Sparked an Organic Revolution by Ron and Arnie Koss (Chelsea Green, 2010)

This is a very well-written book—but not a pretty story. The twin brothers who founded Earth’s Best, the first company ever to produce organic baby food at commercial scale and with national distribution, planted a flag in the ground for 100% organic, top quality, and unwavering ethics.

Starting an organic baby food company turned out to be a whole lot harder than, say, manufacturing natural ice cream. Especially when you have no experience manufacturing anything at all (never mind the specific and very complex world of making baby food), you’re wildly undercapitalized, you discover that no existing manufacturing plant can keep the organic food separate so you have to build your own, your production equipment is beyond ornery, and you’ve chosen to locate in Vermont—3000 miles from the California base of most of the organic commercial growers that existed in the late 1980s US.

It gets even harder when you have to bring in venture capitalists with no understanding of the organic movement and no respect for the company culture, and you’re forced to give up control inch by inch over a period of years. These two very decent men got slapped in the face by the production issues and then knifed in the back repeatedly by the players they brought in to save the company.

Amazingly, Earth’s Best somehow survived, and was eventually sold to Heinz, and then to the natural foods conglomerate Hain Celestial. And it eventually became profitable, though long after the founders were forced out. And not so amazingly, the idea of natural baby food caught on, and all the major players eventually added natural and organic lines. For this, eco-conscious parents should give thanks to these brothers.

But the real reason to read this book is to learn from their mistakes. Use it as a negative playbook, so if you’re ever going for funding, you’ll know how NOT to get shafted. Too bad crowdfunding didn’t exist back then.

Of course, the book is told from their points of view. Those they battled with might tell a different story. And they made a number of errors, and then kept making them. Issues with sourcing and manufacturing had to be overcome, and sometimes that meant dumping unsatisfactory inventory for pennies on the dollar. These things happen. But their tolerance for incompetent, arrogant managers surprised me. And even worse, after getting burned multiple times, I’d have thought they would figure out that no oral promise is worth anything. Get. Everything. In. Writing.

I’ve read a lot of corporate histories, including several in the natural foods industry or other green sectors, and I don’t think I’ve ever read such a heartbreaking one. It’s an unfortunate reminder that too many people in power see business as worse than dog-eat-dog, and those of us who view high ethical standards and a compassionate approach as assets need to protect ourselves from others who are rapacious and uncaring.

The Clean and Green Club, March 2016

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, March 2016
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Do you have five minutes to help me better understand and serve your green/social change business needs? Please fill out this quick survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/9NHHMQ8
This Month’s Tip: What’s Really Involved in Launching a Book
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Bad news for authors who think the work is done when they turn in the manuscript. That’s when the real work just begins. There’s always so much to do for a book launch.

As you know, my 10th book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World comes out April 19. I could keep five of me busy, full-time, between now and the launch date.

Here’s a bit of a window on what I’ve been up to with it. I post this both as a guideline for how to launch a book and as inspiration that even though I’m doing most of this myself, I’ve been able to get quite a bit done—even while doing numerous non-book-launch projects as well (including ghostwriting a book and helping my daughter plan her wedding). This is only a partial list:

Last summer: 

  • Secured endorsements from 22 well-known people including Jack Canfield, Seth Godin, Ivan Misner (founder of BNI), Joel Makower (founder of GreenBiz.com), and the author of The New Rules of Green Marketing (among others). 
  • Obtained four guest essays from marketers Yanik Silver and Ken McArthur, as well as Cynthia Kersey (author of Unstoppable/Unstoppable Women) and Frances Moore Lappé (Diet for a Small Planet)
  • Began talking up the book and showing around the cover at live events and media interviews
  • Put up http://goingbeyondsustainability.com for the corporate market and http://impactwithprofit.com for entrepreneurs/startups
  • Secured cooperation from my charity partner Green America and support from Jeannie and Amy Levinson, wife and daughter of my late co-author Jay Conrad Levinson

December

  • Wrote and posted several press releases with different angles
  • Assembled and posted a full media kit: http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/media-center/
  • Prepared sample reviews in three different word lengths
  • Did the first of three bulk mailings to my list
  • Began to actively tout the book in my newsletter and on social media

Jan-Feb

  • FINALLY came up with the elusive brand I’d been trying to find for two years. I feel it accurately and interestingly describes the new work I’m doing showing business how to turn hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war into peace, and catastrophic climate change into planetary balance (this is what the new book is about)—and built a new website around this brand: http://transformpreneur.com
  • Booked in-person launch events in NYC (4/16, at a major green festival), Western Massachusetts (3/8 at a prestigious college, 4/20 at our best local bookstore), and Brattleboro, VT, 4/30 (at Slow Living, a very well-regarded environmental conference)
  • Booked about a dozen podcast and radio appearances and began to tape the first several
  • Went through 1500 media and 3300 personal contacts, selecting several hundred people to reach out to, personalizing my letters to them (not just with name but with a line or two specific to each). Some I invited to be launch partners, some to cover me in their media, and some to attend the local book launch (I still have room for people in all those categories, BTW)
  • Secured commitments to promote to their own lists and/or on social media from 85 people (as of March 1) with aggregate total list size of several hundred thousand
  • Wrote a bunch of tweets, newsletter solo mailings, newsletter blurbs, and social media posts, tweaking them for three different audiences: guest essayists, endorsers, and supporters
  • Hired a publicist, worked closely with him to shape a lengthy and unusual press release, and had him send out two blasts, to 5000 reporters each time—and answered each response individually
  • Renewed contact with a VA who had sold me ten hours of time a few years ago and told her I’m ready to use it on a social media campaign
  • Contacted a publisher where I had ad credits and arranged to use them
  • Submitted several articles to various publications and had most of them accepted

March (except for a trip abroad with probably very little Internet) and April will be equally busy.

Preorder your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Release date is April 19, just in time for Earth Day, and you can now preorder from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies from me). Learn all about this powerful book at http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
Hear and Meet Shel
Connect with Shel


Find on Facebook


About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriteraward-winning author of ten booksinternational speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.

He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).

“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

WARREN WHITLOCK HOSTS ME ON BLAB, Friday, March 25, noon ET/9 a.m. PT. This is an open conversation. You can turn your camera on and join in, or ask real-time questions in the chat, as long as you give your Twitter screenname. https://blab.im/y75eqa – this will be my very first time guesting on Blab.

GUEST ON THE BARRY MOLTZ SHOW, any time after Sunday, May 1, 6:30 a.m ET http://barrymoltz.com/business-insanity-talk-radio-with-barry-moltz/

GUEST FOR RONALD M. ALLEN’S MANAGING CHANGE SHOW, Monday, April 4, 10 a.m. ET/7 a.m. PT http://www.blogtalkradio.com/managechange/2016/04/04/shel-horowitz–going-green-raises-revenues-and-lowers-costs

GUEST FOR FRANKIE PICASSO ON THE GOOD RADIO NETWORK, Tuesday, April 5, 1 pm ET/10 a.m. PT. http://www.toginet.com/shows/MissionUnstoppable

GUEST FOR ADAM LERNER’S MARKETING PODCAST, Wednesday, April 13, 1 pm ET/10 a.m. PT (episode will be recorded and posted after production @ http://learnwithlerner.com)

NEW YORK BOOK LAUNCH EVENT for Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World: Green America’s Green Festival—New York, Saturday, April 16, Javits Center. Mainstage talk at 11:30 a.m. followed by book signing. This is a great event; I’ve attended several times and this will be my third time speaking. Not just terrific speakers but also great organic food samples and cool products like the wallet and purse vendor who makes stuff out of old tires (I use one of those wallets that I bought there a couple of years ago).

GUEST ON THE BILL NEWMAN SHOW, WHMP 1400 AM & 96.9 FM, Northampton, MA and online, Monday, April 18, between 9-10 a.m. ET  http://whmp.com/podcasts/shows/bill-newman/

Guest for Ask Those Branding Guys, Monday, April 18, 1 p.m. ET/10 a.m. PT, http://www.santafe.com/thevoice/stream and live over KVSF (101.5 FM) Santa Fe, NM

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION DATE FOR Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World is Tuesday, April 19—and Earth Day is Friday, April 22.

SECOND OF J.V. CRUM’S TWO INTERVIEWS ON CONSCIOUSMILLIONAIRE.COM, Tuesday, April 19 (almost no overlap between this and the earlier show listed at “recent interviews”)


An excerpt from Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, Brand Identity in a Global Economy, is scheduled to run Tuesday, April 19 at CarolRoth.com

Mid-April (air dates not set yet): Interviews with Todd Schnick, http://intrepidnow.com, and Leon Jay, SocialpreneurTV. I should have more complete information on these next month.

WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS BOOK LAUNCH EVENT for Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, Wednesday, April 20, 7 p.m., Odyssey Bookshop, South Hadley. Come early if you want a seat; I’m expecting to fill the room.


HOW TO BUILD A MOVEMENT: INTERVIEW GUEST FOR KRISTIE NOTTO’S BE LEGENDARY PODCAST (f/k/a Kristie T), Wednesday, April 20, 3 p.m. ET/noon PT, http://awesomesaucemarketing.net/kristie-notto-chats-with-shel-horowitz/

SLOW LIVING SUMMIT, Brattleboro, VT, April 28-30 (theme: Food and Agriculture Entrepreneurship), http://www.slowlivingsummit.org/ My talk will be on the 30th @ 1:30 pm: “Impossible is a Dare: How Your Food Business Can Make a Difference on Hunger, Poverty, War, and Catastrophic Climate Change

WEBINAR FOR INDEPENDENT PUBLISHERS OF NEW ENGLAND, “Green Audiences, Green Titles, Green Printing” Thursday, May 26, 6 pm ET/3 pm PT https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7842561726385736194


Recent Interviews & Guest Articles:

Two-part interview on Steve Sapowksy’s excellent EcoWarrior Radio podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/pt.-1-guerrilla-marketing/id1080237490?i=363550688&mt=2/ (Listen to Part 1 before Part 2, of course)

Book excerpt: Green Goods and Services Are Much Easier to Market: http://homebusinessmag.com/businesses/go-green/green-goods-services-much-easier-for-businesses-to-market/

Friends Who Want to Help

Are you an introvert? My friend Val Nelson is offering a small-group mastermind just for you: The Introvert SOULpreneurs Club: http://www.valnelson.com/services/introvert-group

Another Recommended Book: Business in Blue Jeans
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Business in Blue Jeans, by Susan Baroncini-Moe (Sound Wisdom, 2013)

With 34 years in business, I’m not really the market for another book on startup success. But many of my clients and readers are, and I often read books with that audience in mind (and wish I’d read a few in the very early days of my business).

This book is warm, approachable, and full of common sense, as well as a lot of Law Of Attraction and personal motivation material to get a new business up and running on solid footing. I found that many of the suggestions were clumped into certain sections of the book; I’d take a bunch of notes on successive pages and then go 10 or 15 pages without any notes. But even those less useful sections were still a good read.

The book contains several exercises. One I found especially useful is a new way of looking at brainstorming (p. 123). She also has a very small section on business helping the wider world, and I’m glad to see it there, even if it’s not very comprehensive. (My own next book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, goes into far more detail on this.)

Some of the wise nuggets I especially like:

  • Learn how to find the love often hidden in negative messages from friends and family
  • Understand that thinking Law Of Attraction thoughts isn’t enough; you also have to do the work 
  • Create a story that’s consistent with your reality AND with your customers’ experience of you
  • Seek out not only the intersection of your skills and interests and a market, but also for the intersections of both fiery passion and the warm gentle glow (much like a successful long-term marriage)
  • Develop great branding by first targeting your market as narrowly and carefully as possible (and recognize that if you’re in different markets, you probably need different branding and marketing even for the same product)
  • Use “lean in marketing”: be interested, not just interesting, and create a positive user experience
  • Recognize that search keywords, headlines, etc., should speak to the need (the hole your prospect wants to drill) rather than the tool you provide (the drill bit)
  • Acknowledge that more isn’t always better
  • Make sure all employees know that they are the customer service department
  • See mistakes as opportunities to fix things
  • Give value, even when you’re networking

The Clean and Green Club, December 2015

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, December 2015
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Do you have five minutes to help me better understand and serve your green/social change business needs? Please fill out this quick survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/9NHHMQ8

Now Through the End of the Year: Print Editions of Two of Shel’s Best Books (and an award-winning novel by his wife) for Just $4.95 per Copy


Perfect holiday gifts for the entrepreneurs, managers, marketers, and business students in your life—and for your own personal library. Also great to buy in bulk and donate to your favorite educational institutions and charities.
Nobody has to know that you only paid $4.95 each (plus shipping) for these award-winning and classy books from respected publishers. Grassroots Marketing: Getting Noticed in a Noisy World (Foreword Magazine Book of the Year Finalist)(Chelsea Green) retails for $22.95, and Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green (Independent Publisher Magazine Groundbreaking Indie Book)(John Wiley & Sons) retails for $21.95.

My wife, award-winning novelist D. Dina Friedman, decided to join the fun and make one of her novels available at the same price (and hers is a hardback!). Playing Dad’s Song, published by Farrar, Strauss, and Giroux, tells the story of a boy who faces crises ranging from a school bully to the death of his father in 9/11, and finds his way back to his center through music. It’s perfect for kids aged 9-15.

Because we’ve recently taken the rights to these books back, you can have print editions of these critically acclaimed books for less than a quarter of their original prices. Sometimes, there is more power in spreading a message widely, and low prices can make that happen. Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green, especially—with its message of business success through green and ethical business practices—has a role to play in changing the culture, and I want to see that change ignite.

The holidays are coming and everyone loves easy, frugal, useful gift ideas. (Note: if you’d like to be more generous, the gift of a strategic green/social change profitability consultation or copywriting project from me could be life-changing.)

Read more about these amazing books at
http://www.guerrillamarketinggoesgreen.com/ (Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green) CODE: 4.95guerrillabook
http://frugalmarketing.com/gmtoc.shtml (Grassroots Marketing). CODE: 4.95gmbook (it comes with a two-chapter update covering social media, no extra charge)
http://ddinafriedman.com/dinas-books/playing-dads-song/ (Playing Dad’s Song) CODE: 4.95pdsbook

Then visit http://shelhorowitz.com/shels-green-products-and-services/ to place your order. Make sure to use the proper coupon codes.

Note: Paperback only; ebook editions are available at the usual undiscounted price (still a great value). Quantities are limited to what we have in stock. If you’re interested in a bulk purchase, let’s talk. If you’d like your books signed and inscribed, please tell us what to say.

This Month’s Tip: Do You Make Yourself Clear, Part 1
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I was scouting my library for the next book to review and spotted a title by one of the world’s most prominent green economists. Great, I thought—until I started reading.

When I review a book in this newsletter, I read it all the way through. By the second paragraph, I was stumbling over so many obtuse sentences, I knew I wasn’t going to be able to tolerate 300 pages of this. The language was so ponderous, it felt almost like reading a foreign tongue. And I have a degree in communications, am trained in journalism, and I’m an avid reader, reading at least four and as many as 12 books each month of 2015.

Authors of nonfiction generally want to communicate and convince.

Yet, if this book is written too thickly for me, imagine trying to convince a tradesperson who reads two or three novels a year that the message of this book is worth all the work.

Here’s a 111-word excerpt from the paragraph that convinced me not to bother reading the book (it continues for another four lines):

The power of the concept of sustainable development is that it both reflects and evokes a latent shift in our vision of how the economic activities of human beings are related to the natural world—an ecosystem which is finite, non-growing, and materially closed. The demands of these activities on the containing ecosystem for regeneration of raw material “inputs” and absorption of waste “outputs” must, I will argue, be kept at ecologically sustainable levels as a condition of sustainable development. This shift is resisted by most economic and political institutions, which are founded on traditional quantitative growth and legitimately fear its replacement by something as subtle and challenging as qualitative development.

The problem isn’t just a matter of sentence length, but that’s a piece of it. Jamming three long sentences together with no break is certainly part of the problem. Long paragraphs compound the situation. I would have started a new paragraph with “This shift.”


But the biggest problem is the convoluted, meandering thought process. A good edit could easily fix this. To prove the point, I’ve rewritten his first sentence (dropping the word count from 44 words to 22):

Sustainable development’s true power is the way it anchors human economic activities to the natural world—a finite, stable, and closed ecosystem.


You can still get a complex message across with simple, understandable language; you don’t have to talk down to your reader. Consider these two paragraphs:

When you look deeply, a lot of the causes of hunger, poverty, war, violence, and catastrophic climate change turn out to be about resources: who uses how much, whether they’re taken sustainably, how fairly they’re distributed. When we address resources systemically, we’re able to transform hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war and violence into peace, and catastrophic climate change into planetary balance.

We actually know how to do this. Passive-energy construction expert David Bainbridge estimates that not only can we reduce the typical building’s energy footprint by 90 percent on new construction, but we can even cut the footprint on existing buildings by 50 to 70 percent. We knew how to build near-zero net-energy buildings at least as far back as 1983, when Amory Lovins built his house. We understand how to significantly increase crop yields without using chemicals and without compromising quality.

I like to think the above excerpt from my forthcoming book Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World takes some pretty complex concepts and makes them understandable—even with sentences of 36 and 38 words. 

Just to be fair, I’ll be the first to acknowledge that my writing could also use tightening. I think my original is easy to understand, but I could have written it even more clearly, starting by knocking seven words out of the first sentence:

Look deeply: hunger, poverty, war, violence, and catastrophic climate change often turn out to be about resources: who uses how much, whether they’re taken sustainably, how fairly they’re distributed.

Finally, one more example (from a different book) of what not to do:

The [name of tool] provides data profiles of four sample generic companies as starter sets with which to initialize the online simulator dashboard and worksheets.

One sentence, and I’m already lost!

Next month, we’ll look at some specific dos and don’ts to keep your writing clear.


Connect with Shel on Social Media
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About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriteraward-winning author of ten booksinternational speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.

He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).

“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Hear and Meet Shel

NEW YORK BOOK LAUNCH EVENT for Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World: Green America’s Green Festival—New York, Saturday, April 16, Javits Center. Mainstage talk followed by book signing. This is a great event; I’ve attended several times and this will be my third time speaking. Not just terrific speakers but also great organic food samples and cool products like the wallet and purse vendor who makes stuff out of old tires (I use one of those wallets that I bought there a couple of years ago).


OFFICIAL PUBLICATION DATE FOR Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World is Tuesday, April 19—and Earth Day is Friday, April 22. Expect several more events to be added in April, possibly including a return engagement at Gulf Coast Green in Houston.

WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS BOOK LAUNCH EVENT for Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, Wednesday, April 20, 7 p.m., Odyssey Bookshop, South Hadley. Come early if you want a seat; I’m expecting to fill the room.

SLOW LIVING SUMMIT, Brattleboro, VT, April 28-30 (theme: Food and Agriculture Entrepreneurship), http://www.slowlivingsummit.org/ My talk will be on the 30th: “Impossible is a Dare: How Your Food Business Can Make a Difference on Hunger, Poverty, War, and Catastrophic Climate Change

BOOK EXPO AMERICA, Chicago, May 11-13. Hoping to set up an event either at the show or at a local bookseller.

Preorder your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Release date is April 19, just in time for Earth Day, and you can now preorder from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies from me). Learn all about this powerful book at http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
Friends Who Want to Help

DONNA CUTTING’s new book, 501 Ways to Roll Out the Red Carpet for Your Customers, comes out this week (and includes a little contribution from me). If you’re looking for ways to ‘wow!’ your customers, the book gives you 501 easy-to-implement ideas to inspire loyalty, get new customers, and make a lasting impression.

I recommend 501 Ways to anyone who wants to ‘roll out the red carpet’ for their customers, but feels strapped for time, money, and energy. Power-packed with proven, ready-to-implement action ideas to enhance your customers’ experience and make your life easier. http://redcarpetlearning.com/store/

OSHANA HIMOT (the business coach who has catapulted me exactly where I want to be in creating a career around healing the world) is again offering no-charge consultations (and her phone number has changed. She writes:

“I am a business and life coach and work with people in many fields, assisting them to expand their work. it is unique for each person – the best programs to create, the groups to work with, how to find customers and clients…

I work with people who would like to help create a better society and can benefit from coaching. For a complimentary consultation, call 602-463-6797 or email oshanaben@yahoo.com. Oshana Himot, MBA, CHT”

Another Recommended Book: Evolved Enterprise
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Evolved Enterprise: How to Re-think, Re-imagine & Re-invent Your Business to Deliver Meaningful Impact & Even Greater Profit by Yanik Silver (no publisher named, 2015)

When Yanik Silver sent an advance manuscript of his new book, I liked it so much that I adapted a whole chapter as an essay in my own new book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World. He’s one of four outside contributors.

My enthusiasm is apparently shared by a very influential group. Alongside my blurb, he’s got people like Tony Hsieh (founder of Zappos); John Paul DeJoria (co-founder of Paul Mitchell); and my brilliant friend Sam Horn (author of Tongue Fu and several other excellent books).

It’s focused very strongly on how business can have an impact in the wider world, and makes an excellent complement to Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World. But its focus is quite different; with the exception of the shared chapter, there’s almost no overlap. Although Yanik comes out of the world of big-money Internet marketing, his book has an almost spiritual feel—reinforced by the mandala-like concept wheel that opens several chapters. He even uses the term “Transcending” as the third of the three stages of an evolved enterprise; the others are Transactional and Transformational (pp. 48-56).

He draws many lessons in marketing AND management through his own experience and those of his Maverick and Underground members—as well as thought leaders from Thomas Edison to Richard Branson. Edison, he points out, created an entire ecosystem of his ventures, all of which supported each other (p. 93); in the modern world, Zingerman’s does the same thing, with a bakery supplying bread to the flagship deli, for example (pp. 86-88). Tony Hsieh notes the importance of building a culture—not just hiring for values, but firing over them (p. 185). On the same page, Yanik shares a powerful insight about leverage: “little hinges swing big doors.” And a long guest essay by Joe Mechlinski is just filled with powerful leadership insights (pp. 195-207).

It’s a lot about how the good feeling you have making a difference in the world—and the fun you can have while doing it—translates into measurable bottom-line profits. The fun piece is very important to Yanik, a self-described adventure junkie. There’s a long an honorable tradition around this; he notes that the Dalai Lama has referred to himself as a “professional laugher” (p. 104).

That fun often translates to really creative ideas around building a deep and lasting community, internally and externally. Whether it’s exotic branded swag (such as the green Speedos that have become a part of Yanik’s Maverick brand), a unique collective experience, or even the ability to earn some sort of merit badges, as Harley riders do (pp. 170-171)—these can have vast marketing impact.

Creative marketers, he says, have to fall in love with customers and prospects (p. 160), and to use that love to do the unexpected. I’ve said for years that your real brand is not your slogan, logo, colors, etc., but the prospect/customer’s perception of you. Yanik puts it a bit differently: “It’s what other people are saying about you” (p. 161). This could take the form of genuine caring, such as Zappos not just refunding the purchase when a customer’s husband died in an accident before she could give him the brand new pair of boots she’d bought him, but sending flowers for the funeral! (p. 143).

How do you find ways to inject that creativity and that love? Yanik offers not only the usual tools, but also “community decoders” such as origin stories, in-group lingo and rituals, creeds, barriers to participation, sharing the inside story, artifacts, exceptional experiences, AND a higher purpose (pp. 163-180).

He looks quite a bit about the choices we business owners can make in our consumer role. Example: choosing to hire a firm that employs disadvantaged workers to fill goodie bags for a conference (p. 50).

And much of the work is backed up with rock-solid numbers that validate our choices to use our businesses to do good in the world. I knew about Patagonia’s Don’t Buy This Jacket” campaign and mention it in my new book. But I didn’t know that the company’s sales leapfrogged 40 percent in the next two years (pp. 150-151). He has numbers for many of the best known case studies of social entrepreneurship and business creativity.

It would be nice if we could find these numbers easily. Unfortunately, Evolved Enterprise doesn’t have an index, although it has several blank pages at the back where one could have gone. It also could have used a better interior design and one more proofread. Despite these minor flaws, this book crams a lot of wisdom in, breaks it up with a lot of humor and visual concept examples, and could knock years off your social entrepreneurship learning curve. I recommend it strongly, and especially in tandem with my own Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World.

The Clean and Green Club, November 2015

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, November 2015
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Do you have five minutes to help me better understand and serve your green/social change business needs? Please fill out this quick survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/9NHHMQ8

Now Through the End of the Year: Print Editions of Two of Shel’s Best Books (and an award-winning novel by his wife) for Just $4.95 per Copy


Perfect holiday gifts for the entrepreneurs, managers, marketers, and business students in your life—and for your own personal library. Also great to buy in bulk and donate to your favorite educational institutions and charities.
Nobody has to know that you only paid $4.95 each (plus shipping) for these award-winning and classy books from respected publishers. Grassroots Marketing: Getting Noticed in a Noisy World (Foreword Magazine Book of the Year Finalist)(Chelsea Green) retails for $22.95, and Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green (Independent Publisher Magazine Groundbreaking Indie Book)(John Wiley & Sons) retails for $21.95.

My wife, award-winning novelist D. Dina Friedman, decided to join the fun and make one of her novels available at the same price (and hers is a hardback!). Playing Dad’s Song, published by Farrar, Strauss, and Giroux, tells the story of a boy who faces crises ranging from a school bully to the death of his father in 9/11, and finds his way back to his center through music. It’s perfect for kids aged 9-15.

Because we’ve recently taken the rights to these books back, you can have print editions of these critically acclaimed books for less than a quarter of their original prices. Sometimes, there is more power in spreading a message widely, and low prices can make that happen. Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green, especially—with its message of business success through green and ethical business practices—has a role to play in changing the culture, and I want to see that change ignite.

The holidays are coming and everyone loves easy, frugal, useful gift ideas. (Note: if you’d like to be more generous, the gift of a strategic green/social change profitability consultation or copywriting project from me could be life-changing.)

Read more about these amazing books at
http://www.guerrillamarketinggoesgreen.com/ (Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green) CODE: 4.95guerrillabook
http://frugalmarketing.com/gmtoc.shtml (Grassroots Marketing). CODE: 4.95gmbook (it comes with a two-chapter update covering social media, no extra charge)
http://ddinafriedman.com/dinas-books/playing-dads-song/ (Playing Dad’s Song) CODE: 4.95pdsbook

Then visit http://shelhorowitz.com/shels-green-products-and-services/ to place your order. Make sure to use the proper coupon codes.

Note: Paperback only; ebook editions are available at the usual undiscounted price (still a great value). Quantities are limited to what we have in stock. If you’re interested in a bulk purchase, let’s talk. If you’d like your books signed and inscribed, please tell us what to say.

This Month’s Tip: Two Books That Changed My Life—And How I Seized an Opportunity
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Yes, I do have a main article for you—but not here. The article is in two parts because I want you to think about the first part, draw your conclusions, and then examine the second part. I don’t know a good format to do that in an email newsletter, so I’ve put it on my blog. You will find it very worth the trip: http://greenandprofitable.com/two-books-that-changed-my-life-and-how-i-seized-an-opportunity/ (be sure to click to the second part after you’ve read this part).

Oh, and by the way, let me know if you like going to the blog. If the feedback is good, I might do it more often.


Connect with Shel on Social Media
Follow on Twitter

Facebook Profile

LinkedIn

Blog

Green & Ethical Marketing Facebook

Google+

About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriteraward-winning author of ten booksinternational speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.

He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).

“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”

Friends Who Want to Help


The Coming Business SHIFT That Could Change Everything

My friend Yanik Silver’s new book Evolved Enterprise impresses me a great deal. In fact, I blurbed an advance copy and got him to let me reprint one whole chapter in my own new book Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World.


I’m half-way through reading the final version, which I’ll review next month. Meanwhile, he sent this blurb:

It’s time for evolved entrepreneurs, visionary creators, and change makers to rewrite the rules of business for the 21st century.”

Imagine a whole new way for your venture to align purpose and profits, merging head and heart (and maybe even a bit of your inner child).

This is a counterintuitive blueprint to create a “baked-in” impact across your entire company by delivering an exceptional customer experience, creating a culture of fully engaged team alignment, and actually driving your bottom line!

Get Yanik Silver’s new book Evolved Enterprise here – www.EvolvedEnterprise.com

Hear and Meet Shel
I’ve been so busy getting the book done that I haven’t been booking talks lately. But that’s about to change! As the book launch draws closer, I expect to have several engagements. And remember—if you connect me with a paid speaking gig (OR a sponsor who will fund no-pay engagements), you can earn a very nice commission. Please write to me if you would like to help.

Preorder your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World


Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Release date is April 19, just in time for Earth Day, and you can now preorder from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies from me). Learn all about this powerful book at http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
Another Recommended Book: Be Audacious
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Be Audacious: Inspiring Your Legacy and Living a Life That Matters, by Michael W. Leach (Graphic Arts Books, 2015)

This may turn out to be a more personal review than my usual—because I’ve been pretty much living a lot of the principles Leach espouses, for decades, and because it’s been many years since I’ve reviewed an inspirational self-help book in this space. I think the last one, many years ago, was Jack Canfield and Janet Switzer’s amazing The Success Principles.

Yes, we arrived in the same place. However, our paths to this epiphany—our experiences and our perspectives—are very different. Leach is a former athlete who faced unimaginable physical problems, including a near-death illness. He had undiagnosed learning disabilities and was slow to discover the power of reading. He’s a Montana native raised in a rural area, and at publication time, he was 35. And he writes to a generation younger than his own; much of the book uses language that resonates with teens and 20-somethings. And he’s someone who—despite his decision to break away from them—seems to expect “haters” who will dump on him for taking the road less taken, and who call him irresponsible for bypassing the traditional 9-to-5. He seems to encounter them constantly.

By contrast, I’m a whole generation older, at 58. Though I’ve lived in the country for 17 years, and in a small college town for the previous 17, I was raised in apartment buildings in the Bronx (a crowded part of crowded New York City). I was an avid reader who got through a tough childhood with the help of books. And I never found a team sport I wanted to play. When forced to play baseball, I was picked last or almost last, and exiled to the outfield where my low abilities wouldn’t do much damage.

I gave up trying to conform to other people’s expectations in my thought patterns by the time I was 13. I do conform on some of the things that don’t really matter, like what I wear and how I keep my hair—but I think the biggest strength I bring is my ability to think differently, to see both the forest and the trees, to see opportunities for my clients that arise out of completely different situations or industries.

And I’ve found that the more I’m in integrity with my life and my message, the more people respect what I’ve done already, what I’m doing, and what I hope to do: use the profit power of business to turn hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war into peace, and catastrophic climate change into planetary balance. (Is that audacious enough for you, Michael Leach?)

Where we have common ground is in our dedication to preserving and improving the environment, growing out of our mutual love of nature. In our desire to think bigger and act bigger so we can have real impact on the world (a lesson it took me much longer to figure out than it did Michael). And in our adoption of the principles he lays out. To name a few:

Embrace Multiple Passions/Use the “Slash” Model
Michael’s book (his second) could be categorized as self-help/inspiration/memoir. He uses his own experience as a teaching tool throughout the book, as well as case studies from the kids he’s coached, the people he’s encountered on his speaking tours, or those he guided through the wilderness.

Michael doesn’t fit neatly into little boxes. He uses lots of slashes to join together his different parts into a “renaissance soul” (a term coined by my late friend Margaret Lobenstine to describe a Ben Franklin/Da Vinci/Oprah/Buckminster Fuller/Thomas Jefferson type who explores numerous interests and passions. He describes his own set of slashes (ranger/naturalist, fishing and wildlife guide, freelance writer, basketball coach, and founder of a nonprofit) several different ways in the book, and even breaks down the nonprofit role into “executive director/programming coordinator/chief fund-raising coordinator” (p. 178).

My set might look like this: speaker/writer/consultant/practical visionary/social change activist/community organizer/marketer. Or I could apply a completely different set of labels (parent/vegetarian foodie/traveler/student of cultures—to name a small slice of the possibilities) that would be just as accurate. But for me, it all boils down to the core mission: I help people understand that doing the right thing is an opportunity, not a sacrifice—and I model the possibility of environmentally and socially conscious life and work.

For both of us, all of these slices of ourselves are based in passion—in “permapassion,” to use a term called by Leach’s friend Scottie B. Black. I love this word’s linguistic combination of permaculture and passion. And those passions have to go beyond pure hedonism. Yes, take joy in what you do. And at the same time, keep sight of your higher purpose; channel your energies toward the passions that can change the world.

“If Your Self-Talk Isn’t Helpful, Change It” (p. 103)
While it certainly isn’t the whole story, the idea popularized in the book/movie, The Secret, that our thoughts control our destinies has some truth. If you hit yourself over the head with all the reasons you can’t do a thing, you’re not likely to get it done. But if you focus on the reasons you can accomplish what you want to, those paths have a way of opening. And if you dream those big, audacious dreams, you have a responsibility not to sabotage yourself.

Work like an Onion (p. 177), and work yourself out from the your soul to the wider community.
I might flip this one inside-out. Yes, work from the inside out, but also from the outside in. Keep going deeper and deeper until you find the inner truth.

See Happiness not as Entitlement but as Opportunity (pp. 241-242)
You can start creating happiness in others—and in yourself—by doing little good deeds, as simple as smiling or holding a door open. As you learn to think and act bigger, more exciting changes will arise.

Leach focuses a lot on adversity creating resilience. And he’s experienced a lot of adversity. That’s one path; I’ve found plenty of other ways to build resilience. Again, there are many paths.

I could say much more about this book, but this already is longer than most of my reviews. Go get it and decide for yourself.

The Clean and Green Club, September, 2015

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, September 2015
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Can a Book Launch Change the World?
Only if…
1. The book contains powerful new ways of looking at the world, powerful solutions to make and spread change
2. Enough people read the book and start discussing those ideas

Books have often changed the world. Think about The Tipping Point, In Search of Excellence, or even way back to Silent Spring, Tom Paine’s Common Sense and Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin. I could list hundreds more examples.

My forthcoming 10th book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, can change the business world—with your help. It scores well on #1, showing how businesses can not just go green, but actually make a difference AND a profit turning hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war into peace, and catastrophic climate change into planetary balance.

I’d love your help with #2! And there are several incentives to participate. Please visit http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/will-you-help-business-transform-the-world/ for all the details.

A bit more about the book: Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, my second collaboration with the legendary Jay Conrad Levinson (Father of Guerrilla Marketing), comes out in March, with endorsements by Jack Canfield of Chicken Soup, Seth Godin, the founders of BNI and GreenBiz.com, the author of The New Rules of Green Marketing (among others), and essays from the authors of Unstoppable/Unstoppable Women and Diet for a Small Planet as well as marketing superstars Yanik Silver and Ken McArthur.

This Month’s Tip: Types of Partnerships
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Every entrepreneur wants new sources of revenue with almost no risk, yet only a small portion understand how the magic of a good partnership can bring this about. As an example, many partnerships are built around payment for results; rather than paying thousands of dollars to advertise in the media with no guarantee of results, you only pay your partners commissions for the sales they actually achieve for you.

Open your mind to infinite possibilities! Last month we talked about who makes a good partner. Now, let’s look at the myriad ways to structure a partnership.

Partnerships can be extremely simple, or very complex. Either way, they typically fall into three main categories, with thousands of subgroupings. So obviously, this is not a comprehensive list ;-):

Marketing, Branding, and Fundraising

  • Referral, with no commission (see the example from my own early days in last month’s newsletter)
  • Referral, with commission
  • Affiliate (where software tracks commissions for you)
  • Package stuffers: you include an offer from another business when you mail out your orders or bag them at a retail counter (with or without a tracking code)
  • Co-marketing multiple products and services from multiple vendors, as individual offerings
  • Co-marketing multiple products and services from multiple vendors, as a single value-added and/or discounted package (as the separate companies with a word processor, spreadsheet, and database did years ago when they created a suite to compete with Microsoft Office)
  • Partnering with a charity/NGO to donate a percentage of sales, time-limited (“dine with us Tuesday and we’ll donate 10% to the food pantry”) or otherwise conditional (“every 50th caller raises another $100 for United Way”)
  • Partnering with a charity/NGO to donate a percentage of sales, ongoing (“portion of the proceeds will be donated to Rainforest Action”)
  • Producing the same product under multiple brand labels (supermarket private-label brands, car companies)
  • Organizing events with a charity partner and bringing in media partners (radio and TV stations, newspapers, popular Internet sites) to publicize the event at no charge
  • Joining forces to create and promote theme-based events, geographical groupings, or other promotions that benefit all participants (maps showing groups of artisanal food businesses or antique shops, themed festivals for craft beer or renewable energy, Taste of the City/Neighborhood restaurant fairs
  • Similar efforts for geography-based communities, neighborhoods, or even individual streets without an overriding theme, such as this example of a street in St. Augustine, Florida: https://www.facebook.com/AvilesStreet

Operations and R&D

  • Joining forces to address different parts of a complex project (the massive energy efficiency retrofit of the Empire State Building involved companies with expertise in window remanufacturing, temperature controls, insulation, and overall green building design)
  • Co-creating new products and technologies (the PowerPC computer chip that ran many computers in the 1990s was a joint project of Apple, IBM, and Motorola)
  • Engaging corporate and NGO leaders in a joint visioning/revisioning process to develop much greener, more socially conscious approaches in business (this month’s recommended book has dozens of examples; I also consult on this)
  • Presenting a unified front to address big problems (as European car manufacturers did when they agreed on strategies and processes to take back used up vehicles at the end of their useful life and reuse the parts, pointing out to the government that having their cooperation would work better than an adversarial relationship)
  • Mergers and acquisitions

Financial

  • Cooperative ownership
  • Pay-upfront memberships such as CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) farms
  • Stock options/employee ownership plans
  • Traditional financial partnerships, such as silent partners, angels/VCs, and IPOs—and the more consumer-oriented models such as mutual funds that create partnerships with thousands of members
  • Issuing scrip; your customers and neighbors can buy “currency” usable only at your business, typically for 10 to 20 percent less than the face value
  • Local currency networks, such as Ithaca Hours (Ithaca, NY and vicinity) and BerkShares (Berkshire County, MA)
  • Computerized barter networks
  • Time trade networks, where an hour of a doctor’s labor is worth the same as an hour of a babysitter’s

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About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriteraward-winning author of ten booksinternational speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.

He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).

“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”

Friends Who Want to Help

30-minute no-charge session with a master business and life coach
Posting this on behalf of my friend, colleague, and masterful coach Oshana Himot. I have benefitted enormously working with her. She’s really helped me crystalize the idea that I can shift my focus to turn hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war into peace, and catastrophic climate change into planetary balance—through the profit motive. Without her, I wouldn’t have done my TEDx talk, “Impossible is a Dare” (hear the talk and see the slides at http://www.business-for-a-better-world.com/tedtalks/ )
nor would I have written the new book.

She writes: “If you work to change society in positive waysI’m a skilled coach who can help you work through the stuck places and go forward… With a mix of both business and life coaching skills, and MBA, and a diversified set of tools, I work with you as the unique and wonderful person you are–and the amazing, powerful person you’d like to become. What you would like to achieve.

“How can this work can benefit you? Schedule a complimentary 30-minute session and find out. You can reach me at 602-463-6797 or through email at: oshana@oshanasjoywork.com.

Debbie Allen’s new book on Positioning—Yours at NO Cost
I’ve got an exciting gift for you! Download my friend Debbie Allen’s brand new book, EXPERT POSITIONING: How to Dominate Your Competition and Gain High Paying Clients at no cost. Expert Positioning is a great way to stand out and market your business; I’ve personally built my business with it. Debbie’s been in the expert space for decades. Her new book walks you through the process to setting up your expert business so you can easily gain higher paying clients and make more sales. Get your free copy now at www.ExpertDomination.com 

Hear and Meet Shel
I’ve been so busy getting the book done that I haven’t been booking talks lately. But that’s about to change! As the book launch draws closer, I expect to have several engagements. And remember—if you connect me with a paid speaking gig (OR a sponsor who will fund no-pay engagements), you can earn a very nice commission. Please write to me if you would like to help.


Just announced: a stellar looking Guerrilla Marketing Reunion with a lineup that includes Seth Godin, Jay Conrad Levinson’s widow Jeannie Levinson, Joel Comm, Loral Langemeier, and several other luminaries, November 2-4 in Orlando. Price is very reasonable. I’m going; how about you? http://guerrillamarketingfamilyreunion.com/ (Oh, and let me know if you’re a nonsmoker who’s interested in sharing a hotel room.)
Another Recommended Book: The Necessary Revolution
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The Necessary Revolution: How Individuals and Organizations Are Working Together to Create A Sustainable World, by Peter Senge, Nina Kruschwitz, Joe Laur, and Sara Schley

Most of the books I’ve been reviewing the last several years have been published relatively recently, often within three years. With a 2008 copyright, this book is outside of that pattern. And while there are pieces of it that are a bit dated—for instance, evaluating and praising BP’s actions on behalf of the environment pre-Deepwater, and of course the dramatic shifts in the fossil fuel climate due to new (and very invasive/destructive) technology and the concurrent shifts in the economy following the recession.

Yet about 90 percent of this book is still intensely relevant, and the orientation toward holistic approaches and working together from different sectors on common goals (e.g., corporate and NGOs or corporate and major government regulators) yields terrific examples and remarkable insights. I like the way it pays attention to both results and process, and demonstrates repeatedly that inclusivity —when combined with holistic thinking and powerful visioning—creates better, longer-lasting, more future-focused results. In other words, it’s not about being less bad, but about rethinking an entire way of doing things to create a greater good in the first place; they see the solution as based in innovation, not coercion—something Buckminster Fuller, who suggested that we humans learn to live on our energy income (i.e., renewables) rather than energy capital (fossil fuels), would agree with (p. 8). By working backward from the world we want to achieve, rather than patching the failures of today’s world, we can leapfrog the incremental small gains and totally rethink and reshape the business world, and heal the planet. So give it a whirl, even if you think 2007 data is too old.

Some of what you’ll learn will be about the changes brought about by the 20th century industrial model—like the shocking statistics that the number of cars in the world leapt from 50 million in 1950 to 800 million less than 60 years later (six times the growth in population), or that (as of 2007) 90 percent of all raw materials ended up as waste (p. 16).

But that second statistic is cause for hope, because it opens up the possibility to use resources far more effectively. If we can bring that 90 percent down to, say, 10 percent, that means we need far less mining, fewer landfills, less energy and water in manufacturing, use, and disposal, and many other benefits.

You’ll also learn powerful stories about individuals who led their organizations not just to a new understanding of how business can profit while serving a higher social and environmental good, but to new products and services—as well as new corporate structures and partnerships (with competitors, trade associations, NGOs/nonprofits, and government agencies), new tools for inclusive decision making and product creation, and new ways of doing business—based in that understanding. If you’ve followed what I’ve written about practical visionaries like Amory Lovins and Dean Cycon (both cited) over the years, or what I’ve written about partnership success strategies, it will not come as news.

Let’s make that hope much more concrete, by sharing just a few of the numerous case studies in the book:

  • After a bunch of folks from Xerox went on a guided wilderness retreat, they saw a Xerox copier rusting in a landfill. This caused an epiphany: they could design copiers that sent nothing to the landfill. Putting this into action meant addressing such issues as product lifecycle and energized the group to reinvent copier technology. While the defunct copier they saw had more than 2000 parts and was not easily disassembled, the Lakes Project model this team developed had just 200 parts and came apart easily for reuse and recycling, and kept 122,000,000 pounds of material out of landfills in a single year (pp. 288-289).
  • BMW, which had been developing plans to collect and recycle worn-out cars, expanded to create a consortium of all car manufacturers in the European Union, developed practical methods to design cars for eventual disassembly and reuse, and then went to the EU government as a united front, with workable plans for the makers to take end-of-life responsibility for their products. The EU adopted their recommendations, which avoided certain regulations the manufacturers felt were unrealistic or too restrictive while accomplishing the agreement to collect and recycle with essentially no pushback from industry—because industry designed the program (pp. 230-232, 248). 
  • Alcoa piloted a massive water reuse project in one plant, and saw an 85 percent reduction in water consumption (p. 182).
  • Meanwhile, Coca-Cola partnered with the global environmental group WWF to examine its total water footprint—including, for instance, the huge amount of water needed to grow its sugarcane. (It turns out that other beverages, including coffee and milk, also have enormous water footprints, once we factor in inputs like the amount a cow drinks.) This initiative got urban corporate executives, environmentalists, residents of environmentally sensitive areas, bottlers, and farmers talking to each other in new ways. (pp. 77-95; the case study doesn’t really address the results of the initiative, which was pretty new at the time).

Senge et al tell us it’s crucial to dream big, and to work from a primarily positive vision—that falling a few points short of a massive, world-changing goal is a much greater success than meeting a goal that’s too easy and doesn’t build change (pp. 293, 325-326).

A key point is that innovations, and movements, typically don’t originate at the centers of organizational power—there are exceptions, of course—but at the periphery, with production workers, managers of small units, etc. (p. 364), developing “creative tension” (pp. 294-296). Often, meaningful change happens when one employee champions the cause and makes it happen. Thus, the book features multiple Toolkit sections, which provide an illustrated overview of specific tools that help organizations grapple with these issues—including companies unaccustomed to giving line workers or unit managers a meaningful say in policy. One example is the five pages about understanding when participants are taking on any of four different roles in a meeting (pp. 276-280).

The authors include a zinger at the very end that could be its own book: a brief section (pp. 374-377) on the need to take these group process skills out beyond the human experience, and to not just take the needs of other species into account, but to design processes that include non-human partners. Reading about Amory Lovins’ active collaboration with apes who had learned to communicate with humans, co-designing an ape-friendly living environment, made me jump out of my chair and yell “Wow!”

There’s much more in this book. Go out and get it, read it carefully, and take lots of notes (I took five pages, and I have tiny handwriting).

The Clean and Green Club, July 2015

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, July 2015
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Discounts on My Two Best Marketing Books—Yours for Just $15 each

Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green was published originally by Wiley. It was named a Groundbreaking Indie Book by Independent Publisher Magazine, republished in Italy and Turkey, and on the Amazon category bestseller lists at least 33 different months). 236 pages of great information on marketing green businesses, plus a bonus package worth hundreds of dollars. Originally priced at $21.95.
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Order: http://shelhorowitz.com/shels-green-products-and-services/
Use the coupon code: GMGG15

Grassroots Marketing: Getting Noticed in a Noisy World was published by Chelsea Green, at $22.95. A Finalist for Foreword Magazine’s Book of the Year Award, this large-format paperback has 306 pages of information to help any business or organization market more effectively and spend less money doing so. It includes a bonus two-chapter ebook covering social media and other new developments.
Learn more:
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This Month’s Tip: Make It Viral, Part 3
Successful Examples and Ideas

I’d hope to fill this whole issue with subscriber success stories. However, only two of you wrote to me with your experiences. I am pretty surprised, as publicity is one of the best ways to make something go viral, and I was offering no-strings-attached publicity.

It may be that viral marketing success is a lot rarer than the gurus make it out to be. In any case, I will fill out the article with other examples.

Participate in Relevant Twitter Chats/Post Exciting Topical Content
Find hashtag Twitter chats that relate to the idea, product, service, or cause you wish to promote. (A good resource is @chatsalad.) Engage in lively conversation with like-minded people on related twitter chats. Ask and answer questions *related* to the topic being discussed. Respond directly to what others say. Be genuine and heartfelt. Do not distort the focus of the dialogue to blast your notices. Keep it very personal. If you contribute something unique, eye-catching, inspiring, or provocative, it’s likely to get retweeted and spread out.

I do best with the chats that have a large audience, hundreds of people. I’m making friends and building relationships. I got really involved in a discussion of the ethics of content marketing on #contentchat. People mentioned, retweeted, and responded. The lively conversation drove up my Klout score [editor’s note: a rough measure of your authority on Twitter].

Also, respond to trends. Within a day, I had 170 comments across social media on a post about Hillary Clinton hiring a Monsanto lobbyist to help her win in Iowa.
–Judah Freed (@judahfreed)

Do a Long-List Blog Post
I consult with people who are looking to come off or find alternatives to medicinal psychiatrics. I wrote a very long list of things people could try before taking them. This was my most successful blog post on my own site ever. It was shared on Facebook over 900 times (I’ve had articles shared more than that, but on other more popular sites). It got viewed 1183 times the day I posted it.
–Chaya Grossberg, Intuitive Healer http://chayagrossberg.com/

Grab Onto a Universal Meme
Dave Carroll and his band the Sons of Maxwell grabbed onto the popular theme of corporate indifference to the trouble they cause ordinary people with their Youtube video, “United Breaks Guitars.” More than 15,000,000 people have watched the main posting of this video as of July 1–and that doesn’t count the gazillion spin-off videos and reposts. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5YGc4zOqozo

Blow the Doors Off People’s Expectations
When an unemployed housewife in a frumpy dress, looking 15 years older than her actual age, walked onstage of “Britain’s Got Talent” six years ago, it was clear that no one expected much. Then she started singing. And Susan Boyle got the singing career she wanted. An astonishing 171,861,870 people have watched this. If you’re not one of them, visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RxPZh4AnWyk

Be Irresistibly Cute
This commercial for Google Android featuring lots of cuddly interspecies friendships has attracted 18,251,438 viewers on Youtube (and probably many more on regular TV). What it doesn’t do, in my opinion, is sell phones (or anything else). I don’t see anything relevant in the song lyrics, the tagline message, or the visuals that does anything to brand Android as my phone of choice (and I own one).

Be Irresistibly Useful
Let’s stay with the Big G for a moment, and go back to its earliest days. Do you remember the first time someone showed you Google’s search engine? The combination of a clean interface, instant results, and a very strong degree of relevance blew a lot of people away, including me. It was lightyears ahead of Alta Vista and Yahoo and Excite, and spread like wildfire. The company was incorporated in September, 1998, and two months later was heralded by PC Magazine as the best search engine, with “an uncanny knack for returning extremely relevant results.” By the time the company started monetizing by selling advertising, a couple of years later, Google utterly dominated search—as far as I know, without buying any paid advertising about its search services.

Create an Unstoppable Movement
I told you about Save the Mountain, the environmental group I formed in 1999, in the May issue. The viral nature of our success was a lot about noticing a moment that was ready for change, and positioning our group to ride the wave. 


In the aftermath of the June United States Supreme Court decision legalizing same-sex marriage, you probably discovered a lot of your Facebook friends had “rainbowized” their profile pictures as a way of celebrating. This was another right-place/right-time movement. I would have never predicted in 1979 when I first attended a same-sex commitment ceremony that gay/lesbian marriage would be legal anywhere in the US within my lifetime. Even after my own state of Massachusetts became the first in 2004, I never thought that 11 years later, it would be the law of the land across the nation. 

It was only in 1969, with the Stonewall riot in New York City during a police raid of a gay bar, that significant numbers of gays and lesbians began demanding acceptance by the mainstream culture. Gay marriage pushed that movement to new heights, while at the same time, the mainstreaming of same-sex lifestyles pushed same-sex marriage. The two together created a synergy that neither one could have done alone. 

The bigotry that had been the “normal” treatment toward non-heterosexuals a few short decades ago is certainly not banished—but it *has* become socially unacceptable. And businesses are harnessing their support to their benefit.


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About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of eight books… international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His most recent book is category bestseller Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet. Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.

He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).

“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Hear & Meet Shel/Friends who Want to Help
As a panelist, I can get you tix to @KenMcArthur’s $697 Impact event, Phila, July 30 to August 2, for just $97: http://theimpactevent.com/97ticket (click the link on that page to see the awesome lineup of presenters, then return to the link above to get the deal). If you attend, be sure to say howdy.
Another Recommended Book—Engaging Emergence: Turning Upheaval into Opportunity

Engaging Emergence: Turning Upheaval into Opportunity by Peggy Holman (Berrett-Koehler, 2010)


Out of chaos, something different and better can often emerge—if we respond to disruption as a growth opportunity, at least.

From running a meeting to creating a revolution, Holman cites numerous examples of harnessing disruption, working through it to something more inclusive, easier on the environment, and more likely to create the world we want—even if getting to this wonderful destination can be painful. She encourages us to “embrace mystery: seek the gifts hidden in what we don’t know,” “choose possibility: call forth ‘what could be,’” and “follow life energy: trust deeper sources of direction.”
Change, she says, will be 10 times as rapid in the 21st century as it was in the 20th (which was in turn the fastest-changing period in history). This means recognizing that big change often starts with tiny steps…viewing problems not as something to fix, but as doorways to new opportunities…understanding that when we make space for divergent viewpoints and time not only to act but to contemplate, the whole group can go much deeper.

When we do move to action, she tells us to
• Compassionately disrupt, by asking possibility-oriented questions that lead to “a virtuous cycle of creativity and renewal”
• Creatively engage with people of different viewpoints and experience; get out of our own comfort zones
• Foster “wise renewal,” remembering that answers and solutions are likely to be nuanced rather than absolutes

Here’s a possibility-oriented question about asking questions: “How do we shape inquiries so compelling that they focus us on the best of what we can imagine, attract others, and connect us to realize what we most desire?” (p. 80).

Holman is a co-founder of Journalism that Matters, a group that seeks to keep journalism relevant and focused on the wider world. To the famous journalists’ 5 Ws (Who, What, When, Where, Why), she adds a sixth: “What’s possible now?”

With my focus for the past year on business solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change, I was particularly intrigued when Holman 1) pointed out the energy savings of peace; when we listen better, we fight less:

Wisdom seems to be emerging more often as evolution itself evolves toward increasing complexity, diversity, and awareness. Whether truth and reconciliation in South Africa or peace in Northern Ireland, intractable challenges are being settled peacefully. Perhaps wise renewal is moving us toward increased energy efficiency. Emergence through creative engagement no doubt uses far less energy than war. (pp. 175-176)
And 2), she described a session with Palestinian activists, who used a technique called Appreciative Inquiry to look beyond resisting the separation wall sealing them off from Israel—to harnessing the wall as part of the process of change. (pp. 119-120)

Until next month…

The Clean and Green Club, April 2015

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, April 2015
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Lots of Book News and Your Chance to Save
I’ve just taken the rights back for two of my award-winning books, Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green and Grassroots Marketing: Getting Noticed in a Noisy World. In celebration, I’m putting them on sale this month. For the rest of April, you can get either or both of them for just $15 each, plus shipping. Because I’ve taken the rights back, you will not find these sold as new on Amazon or other regular channels. But I have a good inventory of them. And if you want to buy five or more, I’ll cut you an even better deal.

Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green was published originally by Wiley. It was named a Groundbreaking Indie Book by Independent Publisher Magazine, republished in Italy and Turkey, and on the Amazon category bestseller lists at least 33 different months). 236 pages of great information on marketing green businesses, plus a bonus package worth hundreds of dollars. Originally priced at $21.95.
Learn more: guerrillamarketinggoesgreen.com/
Order: http://shelhorowitz.com/shels-green-products-and-services/
Use the coupon code: GMGG15

Grassroots Marketing: Getting Noticed in a Noisy World was published by Chelsea Green, at $22.95. This large-format paperback has 306 pages of information to help any business or organization market more effectively and spend less money doing so. It includes a bonus two-chapter ebook covering social media and other new developments.
Learn more: guerrillamarketinggoesgreen.com/
Order: http://shelhorowitz.com/shels-green-products-and-services/
Use the coupon code: GM15 

And Something Brand New: Green And Profitable is Now a Book
Green And Profitable, my 9th published book, is a compilation of the four years of my Green And Profitable monthly column, which was syndicated in the US, Australia, and Malaysia. It’s designed as an ebook, and I not only put together the whole anthology but also divided into four sections, each of which is available individually as a smaller, less expensive book:


• Book 1: Profitable Green Business Practices
• Book 2: Marketing Strategy/Messages for Green Businesses
• Book 3: Policy and Ethics Issues for Green Businesses
• Book 4: The New Realities of 21st Century Business
• Books 1-4: Compilation (your best value)

It’s available in as an e-book from Nook, iTunes, and Amazon/Kindle. If you want a paper copy, you can order one from CreateSpace.com. The electronic versions are just $2.99 for the sectional books and $9.99 for the whole thing ($5.99 and $12.99 for the paperbacks). And remember that if you’re buying the compilation, you don’t need the smaller books. This is the first time I’m playing in the sandbox of commercial ebook channels.

Order from Nook (Barnes & Noble): http://shelhorowitz.com/go/Gprof-Nook/
Order from Apple iTunes: http://shelhorowitz.com/go/GProf-iTunes/
Order from Amazon/CreateSpace: http://shelhorowitz.com/go/GProf-Amazon/
This Month’s Tip: Co-Solve It! Part 2: When One Solution Addresses Several Problems

How can we emulate nature in co-solving several problems at once? As promised last month, this time, we’ll look at actual examples of business offerings that confront more than one problem.


Many companies and organizations have come up with wonderful ideas, such as:

1. d.light, which markets solar-powered LED lanterns to replace kerosene lanterns in developing countries in Africa and Asia. The lanterns:
a. Eliminate fire risk (benefit: safety)
b. Eliminate toxic fumes (benefit: health)
c. Save money by eliminating the need to keep buying kerosene (benefit: economic)
d. Provide better quality of light (benefits: eye health, comfort, ease of accomplishing tasks
e. Allow children to work longer and more efficiently on school projects (benefits: education, long-term earning power through better grades)
f. Allow adults to do after-hours cottage industry (benefit: economic)

2. Urban Food Projects
a. Turn abandoned or empty spaces such as rooftops, vacant lots, traffic islands, median strips into attractive, living spaces (benefits: quality of life, and eventually attracting economic development)
b. Bring fresh, local food into poor communities (benefits: health, quality of life)
c. Create pollution-absorbing buffer zones, reducing asthma, emphysema, etc. (benefits: environment, health health)
d. Train local urban youth in food production, providing marketable skills, positive experience with collaborative problem solving, and a respect for the land (benefits: economic: job skills training, job creation; quality of life: reduction in vandalism, sense of purpose and of ability to change unhealthy/undesirable situations)
e. Decrease CO2 and other greenhouse gas emissions (benefit: environment)

3. Kenguru, maker of a personal transportation vehicle for wheelchair users:
a. Replace heavy, bulky, complex wheelchair vans with light, compact personal vehicles (benefits: environmental: fewer raw materials; economic: longer road durability; maintenance: eliminating hydraulic lifts)
b. Replace gasoline or diesel power with electric (benefits: environmental: reduced pollution, reduced carbon footprint, potentially renewable energy sources; quality of life: reduced noise; health: potentially reduced exposure to contagious diseases from other riders)
c. Provide any-time, anywhere personal mobility (benefits: increased personal freedom, better time management by eliminating the need to wait for a paratransit driver and by shortening the time needed to load a wheelchair user in and out)

4. Israeli/Palestinian cooperative projects, e.g., Neve Shalom/Wahat al-Salam
a. Expose both cultures to the humanness of their “enemy” and debunk myths/stereotypes (benefit: peace)
b. Share best practices in desert agriculture and architecture (benefit: environment)
c. Increase fluency in the other’s language (benefit: economic: more employable
d. Form a constituency for long-term solution (benefit: peace)
e. Spread the benefits and knowledge through public outreach—speaking, performing, media, etc. (benefit: peace)

5. 3-D printing offers numerous benefits in both speed and cost:
a. Quickly replace a failed machine part without waiting weeks for a new one to be ordered (benefit: economic: work can resume much more rapidly)
b. Service a wide range of equipment without needing an enormous parts inventory (benefits: economic and environmental: money not tied up in inventory, real estate not needed to store the inventory)
c. Develop and test new prototypes at a fraction of the former time and cost (benefit: product development)
d. Customize devices to the user’s needs, affordably (benefit: customer loyalty)
e. Create one-off, individualized solutions to medical problems—or distribute more widely applicable technology quickly and cheaply (benefits: health, economic, more efficient hospital/clinic utilization)
f. Make generic products available in communities that could not afford them in the past (benefits: economic and environmental)

Hear & Meet Shel
Celebrate Earth Day!
Shel will be a guest on Green Divas Radio, talking about being green and profitable AND how business can solve hunger, poverty, war, and climate catastrophe. TheGreenDivas.com, Tuesday, April 21, 3 pm ET/noon PT.

Then, the next day, which actually IS Earth Day, Shel will be talking about different income streams for writers with Janice Campbell of NAIWE. PLEASE NOTE SCHEDULE CHANGE. http://news.naiwe.com/2015/03/10/shel-horowitz-multiple-streams-of-income-for-writers/
Multiple Streams of Income for Writers. Janice Campbell of NAIWE interviews Shel.

This is a new program. Here’s the description:

With eight nonfiction books under his belt, including the long-running bestseller Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green and award-winners Grassroots Marketing for Authors and Publishers and Grassroots Marketing: Getting Noticed in a Noisy World, you’d think Shel Horowitz might be one of those people who makes a living selling books.

But actually, book sales are only small pieces of a diversified income, all of it involving the same analytical and communication skills he uses to write his books.


This call will explore several income streams writers can pursue, such as:

• Speaking

• Consulting on the publishing process
• Consulting on your field of expertise (in Shel’s case, profitability and marketing for green/socially conscious businesses as well as authors and publishers—and with companies that want to turn hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change into sufficiency, peace, and planetary balance)
• Commercial writing for business: marketing and informational copywriting, correspondence, company histories, executive biographies, speeches, social media feeds, etc.
• Commercial writing for individuals (from resumes to thank-you notes to social media profiles)
• Foreign and subsidiary rights sales
• Product sales other than books
• Ads on your website
• Teaching and training
• Event organizing and facilitation
• Article, blog, and newsletter writing
• Radio and TV work as on-air personality, pundit, analyst, etc.

So here’s the good news: you can be a writer and make a living, even if the obvious ways aren’t working for you. Shel started his writing and consulting business back in 1981 as a typing service, “to hold me over until my freelance magazine and newspaper career took off.” The business kept evolving and is now an international copywriting, consulting, and speaking enterprise with clients on five continents. (He hasn’t typed a term paper in 25 years, and hasn’t had an outside employer since 1981.)

Shel will be Katie Curtin’s guest on the Creativity Cafe,
Wednesday, May 13, 8 pm ET/5 pm PT. I don’t have the listen link yet, but you can probably find it at www.creativitycafeonline.com–or check my Twitter feed (@ShelHorowitz) that day. Oh, and if you follow me, please send me an @ message telling me you’re a subscriber. I’ll be sure to visit your profile.

Connect with Shel on Social Media
Follow on Twitter

Facebook Profile

LinkedIn

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Green & Ethical Marketing Facebook

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About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of eight books… international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His most recent book is category bestseller Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet. Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.

He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).

“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”

Friends who Want to Help

As Promised Last Month—The Shift Network’s Earth Day Summit

On April 22, more than 30 indigenous wisdom-keepers, green pioneers, innovators, activists, scientists, artists and visionaries are coming together to share what we ALL can do to awaken humanity for a healthy, sustainable and thriving planet.

Join Arkan Lushwala, Chief Phil Lane, Jr., Drew Dellinger, Andrew Harvey, Esperide Ananas and others for this free online event – and learn what you can do to foster a sacred connection with the Earth.

You’ll discover:
• How the Earth is alive and how that impacts who we are and our sense of purpose
• How we can look to the natural world for guidance in these challenging times
• The wisdom that indigenous elders have for us at this critical time
• What humanity is evolving into as a planetary species
• How the natural world reveals the secrets to successful and sustainable economic models
• What gives us cause for hope, given the daunting chaos of our time 


April 22 – https://shiftnetwork.isrefer.com/go/eds15GP/sah/ 
Another Recommended Book—Getting A Grip

Getting A Grip, by Frances Moore Lappé


This remarkable little book was autographed to me back in 2007 and sat on my shelf unnoticed until early 2015. Wow!

Part of me wishes I’d read it earlier—but part of me understands that I am much more ready to ACT on its message now than I was seven years ago—it fits in perfectly with the work I’m doing around showing the business community how to profit by developing products and services to address hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change.

For decades, Lappé has worked on both food democracy and grassroots citizen democracy, which she calls “Living Democracy”—something much larger and deeper than the “Thin Democracy” embodied in our electoral process. This book continues the tradition, and really looks at the powerful, empowered, vibrant, fun-to-live-in world we can create.

Yet the book starts very pessimistically, with a Spiral of Powerlessness infographic on the inside front cover. Knowing a bit about Lappé’s thought processes (I’ve been following her since I came across Diet for a Small Planet in the 1970s and have heard her speak at least twice), I immediately flipped to the inside back cover, relieved to find the counterbalancing Spiral of Empowerment infographic I’d expected.

The content of the book, overall, is a lot more empowering than the inside front cover. Democracy, she says, is not something we have, but something we create. Lappé’s focus is actually on creating a world that we can be proud to live in—a world where all of us have found our power and have used it to make important changes; action actually inspires hope. Often, these changes look small at first, but they ripple out society-wide, and the cumulative impact of these often-voluntary steps is vast—even when we can’t see it right away. Not only that, but when we get corporations to make concessions around quality of life and the environment, often their profits go up too. Win-wins are nice, aren’t they?

A lot of this is about decentralizing power. Lappé points out that the decentralized Aztecs were far better able to withstand the invasion of European soldiers (and held them at bay for 200 years), while the hierarchical Maya and Inca societies quickly crumbled before the Spaniards. Similarly, she sees top-down approaches to today’s assorted crises as far less likely to succeed than building democratic movements.

In her view, power and fear have been far too intermingled. Either we’re afraid of people who have power, or we fear taking our own power. Fear too often paralyzes us—but it can just as easily be converted to energize us. And she points out the difference between power over others and power we get working in community to improve our world. Our choice, she says, is not whether to change the world, but how we’ll change it. A movement always starts with just a few people, or even one person, and spreads outward, even if we fail to believe in our own power.

Lappé sets an ambitious agenda where we might engage our democracy, harness our power, and improve the world. A few of her goals:
• Seeing food as a human right (she notes that there is enough to go around)
• Ending the $700 billion in worldwide fossil fuel subsidies
• Ensuring that manufacturers take back their products at the end of their useful life (this concept is often called “cradle-to-cradle”)

And she sees hope all over the place: in the rise of the co-op, fair-trade, and buy-local movements…in resistance to economics that put corporate profits ahead of people’s needs…in a Clean Elections law in Maine that then enabled passage of a cradle-to-cradle law…in the 63 million Americas who now factor social and environmental criteria into their purchasing decisions…in organizers’ ability to take a large scary issue and find an entry point to ignite passions and change minds.

It’s one of the best books on citizen empowerment and deep democracy that I’ve come across (and I’ve read quite a few). Put it on your must list.