Category Archive for Clean and Green Marketing Newsletter

The Clean and Green Club, March 2017

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
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Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, March 2017
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Listen to the Best Interview I’ve Ever Done
Kymm Nelsen of the Conscious Leadership Podcast managed to pull more from me than anyone else has ever done. In 51 minutes, we covered so much that I list 17 separate points on my interviews page —and that was not a complete list. It’s one of three shows I’ve added to that page. Visit the page to scan the list and note what to listen for—and of course to click over and read it.

And watch this space for links to interviews by Internet marketer Willie Crawford, PR queen Annie Jennings’ Elite Wire, Lisa Faulkner of Game Changers, Ali Salman of Escape the 9 to 5 Grind, and Karina Cooke of the Business Code Podcast.

This Month’s Tip: How to Tell Good Advice from Bad Advice

My grandfather used to read all seven of NYC’s daily newspapers (most of which have since gone out of business) in order to triangulate a picture of what was *really* going on.

  • Listen to multiple sources. If you hear the same thing over and over from sources with divergent viewpoints, there’s probably merit in it—but do some due diligence and verify (at least take a quick trip to Snopes.com).
  • Do your own research. Read some books and articles but recognize that the situation may not be comparable.
  • Post specific questions *with as much detail as you can* on discussion lists–but recognize that the advice you get will be a mix of useful and useless. Study the groups before posting questions so you get a sense of whose answers are worthwhile. The more carefully and completely you phrase your question, the better your answers. And learn how to parse it.
  • Listen to your gut. You can even develop the skill of asking your subconscious directly and listening to the answer (which may emerge as a movement of the body).
  • Don’t be afraid to go out of the box, if it seems to be the right move–even if others are telling you it’s too risky. But make sure it really is the right move.

Finally, be prepared when good advice takes you in a different direction, and understand when that makes sense. I’ll tell you a success and a failure.

Back in 2003 as I was preparing my sixth book for publication (my 10th, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, came out in April), I asked a discussion list about subtitles that would go well with my main title, Win-Win Marketing. This was a list where I’d been active for quite a few years, and I had a pretty good sense of the “players.” I heard very strongly from some of the most respected people on the list that my main title was a problem (for reasons I still don’t really relate to)—that the phrase “win-win” had enormous negative baggage for some people.

It took two months of brainstorming to come up with a title: Principled Profit: Marketing that Puts People First. Oddly enough, knowing none of this history, the Mexican publisher (which had originally called it Marketing Based in the People) changed the title on their second print run to Marketing Based in Win-Win (Mercadotechnia basada en ganar-ganar).

Fast-forward to last fall. Someone I’ve known for many years and respect enormously got very excited about the way I am combining a Board of Advisors, Mastermind group and online discussion into a single entity for my new “Transformpreneurial Brain Trust.” She gave me a long and well-thought-out brainstorm about how to commission brand new software that would do everything I wanted. The only problem was that she lost sight of my wider goal, which is to work with the business community on profitable ways to turn hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war into peace, and catastrophic climate change into planetary balance. I realized instantly that this would distract me from my real work and cost me much time and many thousands of dollars. Even though the advice came from a trusted source, it was bad advice for me at that moment. I chose to run with an off-the-shelf platform and to stay focused on my real mission.

New on the Blog
Environment/Travel:

Hear and Meet Shel
Ethical Corporation’s Responsible Business Summit, NYC, March 27-28. I will be moderating a keynote/fireside chat by Franz Paasche of Paypal and a panel with execs from Pirelli, Actiam, and Coca-Cola, both on Monday. I’ll also be attending Tuesday, without any moderation duties. I believe you can still save $200 with the code MP200, when you register at http://events.ethicalcorp.com/rbs-usa/register.php

How Social Entrepreneurs Can Thrive in the New Political Climate: webinar put on by Green America (my fourth for them), Thursday, April 29, 1 pm ET/10 am PT.

I missed Book Expo America last year after attending every one since 1997. But it’s back in NYC and my daughter is NOT getting married the following week (as she did in 2016), so I expect to be attending (May 30-June 2). If there’s interest, perhaps we can organize a gathering.

Note: I still have openings on my calendar for live or virtual events around Earth Day (a week on either side of April 22). Drop me a line or call 413-586-2388 if you have a need (or want to earn a commission by finding me a paying gig).

Order your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Find out more and order from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies directly from me). http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
 
Download a free sampler with several excerpts, the complete Table of Contents and Index, and all the endorsements.
Another Recommended BookA Wrinkle in Time
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A Wrinkle In Time by Madeline L’Engle

When I usually review books about sustainable business, customer skills, marketing and the like, why am I recommending a classic children’s fantasy novel from the 1950s?

Here are some of the reasons:

  1. This book has amazingly useful things to say about resistance to totalitarianism, nonconformity, the role of science, and defying expectations—all of which seem particularly relevant on the world stage right now.
  2. It’s a fun read that might take you only an hour or two, involving a 12-year-old girl and her companions on a classic Joseph Campbell-style Hero’s Journey to rescue her father and save the universe, visiting several planets along the way.
  3. The discussion of tesseracts—folding space in on itself to shorten interstellar travel from millennia to minutes—should spark some excellent creative thinking on themes like: 1) nothing is impossible, 2) we can solve the biggest problems we can imagine; 3) collaboration makes all the difference.
  4. I discovered Wrinkle at age 9 and credit it with helping me survive a very difficult time in the first half of my second decade. I gained enormous strength from it and have read it at least a dozen times.
  5. You might know a kid—or a grownup—who really needs this message right now.
  6. Last but not least, I read a whole business book this month that I decided wasn’t appropriate for the review column and the next one I started is large and I’m nowhere near done with it.
  7. I think it might be fun to mix in an appropriate novel every once in a while. The column has only covered nonfiction since I started it in 2003, but so many novels have changed the world. Arts, including literature, have an important role to play in creating our ideal world, and I should honor that once in a while.

I welcome your feedback on this. Oh, and if my review intrigues you, I interviewed Madeline L’Engle for two hours, back in the early 1990s, on the difference between truth and fact (she has since passed on).

Recent Interviews & Guest Articles: 

Shel’s done 19 podcasts recently, ranging from 5 minutes to a full hour. Click here to see descriptions and replay links.
Connect with Shel

 

 

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About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of ten books…international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel), his newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, has already won two awards and is endorsed by Jack Canfield and Seth Godin. Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Going Beyond Sustainability, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He’s an International Platform Association Certified Speaker and was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.
He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).
“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

The Clean and Green Club, February 2017

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
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Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, February 2017
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This Month’s Tip: Cautions in Setting Up a Social Entrepreneurship Venture

An entrepreneur asked on a discussion list for “best ideas to apply entrepreneurial skills to social enterprise” for a social entrepreneurship bootcamp in Taiwan. Since I’ve spent the last two months showing you how to move forward with social entrepreneurship, I thought you’d benefit to see some of the caution flags, too. Here’s the relevant part of my response:

The earlier a company can build in holistic thinking, the better. I see way too many would-be social entrepreneurs go off half-baked on a poorly conceived project that can actually make the situation worse on the ground. For example, many people jump into the famous Buy One Give One model without thinking through the effect on the pre-existing local economy in the target developing area. It has to be done in ways that don’t undermine the struggling local entrepreneurs. Others create something very dependent on continued input from the developed-nation partner but don’t create the structures to make sure that input IS in fact continued.

I see it as a strength that you want to include marketing, and that your vision of marketing includes storytelling. Social entrepreneurship companies are uniquely positioned to benefit by telling the right story to the right people. I do think some of the pieces you’ve identified may want to wait until the organizations are more established, and that the format should be interactive and not pure lecture.

You may find it helpful to view the ways I bring this material to an audience, by viewing my TEDx talk, http://www.ted.com/tedx/events/11809 (click “event videos”) or my 4-minute demo reel, which is footage from this year and somewhat more evolved: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tooSVbHQ5Ik You would definitely benefit from my 10th book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World—and you can download a sampler at no cost at http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world

If your situation is similar to this entrepreneur’s, here are some other cautions to consider:

  • Will it be economically viable? Without profit or a funding source, all the good in the world will be undercut by the need to close before completion, leaving people frustrated and enraged as the progress they’d made disappeared.
  • Can your project be developed without enormous expenditures of resources, time, and money?
  • Do you have buy-in from locals on the ground that will partner with you?
  • Will the project sustain itself using local managers once you’ve moved on?

There are many more questions you should ask yourself. This list will get you started, and then keep asking questions like “and then what happens?” or even the marketer’s question, “so what?”

Again, I’m happy to help you think this through. It’s one of the things I do as a consultant to social change and environmental businesses.

New on the Blog
Just because I haven’t shared with you some of my recent blog posts in months doesn’t mean I’m not blogging regularly. I’ve put up 23 new posts since October 1, or about six new ones per month as of early February. Several I’m particularly proud of (not in chronological order)—note that one post is in more than one category:

Changing the World through Business
The Most Important Question to Create Eco-Friendly Technological Leaps

New Uses for CO2? Elkington’s Latest Out-Front Thinking

$10 Million to Charity—Another Cheer for Patagonia!

When Does Social Change Work Become a “Calling”?

Marketing/Customer Service
Will Budweiser’s Gamble Pay Off? (analysis of the company’s immigration-themed Superbowl ad)

Why I’ve Boycotted My Neighborhood Theater Since 1969

A committed author is always looking for book promotion opportunities

And THIS is Why Trump Won!

The Election and its Aftermath
George Lakey: DT’s Repression is a Huge Opportunity for the Movement (if you pick just one article on the blog, make it this one)

I DID Give Him a Chance…And That’s Why I March

And THIS is Why Trump Won!

10 Reasons to Resist Nonviolently, Chanukah, And Barbara Kingsolver’s Message

Friends Who Want to Help
JV Crum III, who has twice featured me on his Conscious Millionaire Podcast, turned a recent diagnosis of diabetes into a way to help others. Not only has he cut his blood sugar in half in just two weeks (and without insulin treatments), but he’s changed the focus of his series to “From Diabetes to Healthy and Thriving Entrepreneur.

If you’ve been around the independent publishing community for any length of time, you probably know the name Deltina Hay. Here’s her latest project: Elearning Delta is a full-service elearning solutions company, specializing in innovative course development and custom learning management systems. The Elearning Delta team can produce your elearning project from the ground up, providing full production services all the way through your ecommerce solution. (http://elearningdelta.com)

Hear and Meet Shel
I’ll be one of the featured experts on the Monetise Your Passion Summit with Rita Joyan, February 13-March 5. That’s not a typo; she’s Australian. In fact, she was named Canberra’s Young Business Woman of The Year for 2015. Canberra, you might know, is Australia’s capital. And I’m especially excited because the other experts are not the same old same old. I’ll be learning for the first time from people like:
  • Stephanie Leigh Mulac – how to build 6-7 figure businesses
  • David Essel –  known as The new leader of the positive thinking movement.
  • Jesse Brisendine – founder of the 1 year 1000  challenge
  • Ally Laporte – radio personality and parenting expert  – her radio program has 6 million listeners.

I have several other interviews scheduled but don’t yet have their air dates:

  • With Internet marketer Willie Crawford
  • On the Positive Phil podcast “interviewing entrepreneurs and positive people” (I’m both)
  • With Kymm Nelsen on the Conscious Business Weekly podcast
  • With Alyssa Wright on the Leading Change podcast
  • Business Code Podcast with Karina Crooks
  • Game Changers with Lisa Faulkner

And shortlisted/in negotiation with meeting planners at several other events, but none are definite yet. Possibilities include Chicago and Rapid City, South Dakota, among others.

I’ll be moderating two panels at Ethical Corporation’s 5th Responsible Business Summit NY taking place on March 27-28 2017 at the Brooklyn Marriott Hotel.

The Summit offers three focused tracks all shaped to uncover the REAL potential for CSR to drive profit, accelerate growth and change culture. Over 200 major-corporation delegates will attend to hear 45+ senior level speakers. And I’ve arranged to save you $200 on the conference fee. Just use the code, MP200, when you register at http://events.ethicalcorp.com/rbs-usa/register.php

How Social Entrepreneurs Can Thrive in the New Political Climate: webinar put on by Green America (my fourth for them), Thursday, April 29, 1 pm ET/10 am PT.

I missed Book Expo America last year after attending every one since 1997. But it’s back in NYC and my daughter is NOT getting married the following week (as she did in 2016), so I expect to be attending (May 30-June 2). If there’s interest, perhaps we can organize a gathering.

Order your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Find out more and order from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies directly from me). http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
 
Download a free sampler with several excerpts, the complete Table of Contents and Index, and all the endorsements.
Another Recommended BookPeople Shock
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People Shock: The Path to Profits When Customers Rule by Tema Frank

It’s been a really long time since I’ve reviewed a customer service book in this space. While I love writing about deep sustainability, occasionally I will revisit the basics and review a book on customer service, marketing, or general leadership. As a marketer, I see customer service and leadership as part of marketing. Get customer service wrong, and it doesn’t matter how brilliant your ads and messaging on, how clever your company colors—you’re toast.

This is a nicely written book by someone who was a corporate insider and moved into independent consulting for companies in desperate need of better customer service. And as we all know, a whole lot of companies could benefit from some coaching and consulting on that end.

Frank builds her book around a simple formula:

Promise + People + Process = Profit

She breaks this down, with at least one chapter on each of the 3 Ps on the left side of the equals sign.The promise is what the brand is really about: what your company stands for, its higher purpose.

People, of course, refers to the human factor: treat your workers well, make them feel like valued players, give them enough responsibility to take initiative and make customers happy. And in turn, they will be loyal, productive, and creative, willing to help you achieve greatness by making your customers feel great.

But even the best team will not be able to help you if you fail on process. Staff can be super-friendly and helpful, but if the system just doesn’t work, you’ll still take a hit on the bottom line.

Meanwhile, the companies that do customer service well, like Nordstrom and (in her view) Amazon, are raising the bar. At the same time, and social media provides a forum to massively amplify consumer complaints; she cites the infamous “United Breaks Guitars” video (which I also cite in my own latest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World)—and points out that United failed to learn from that debacle.

Some of her other many good points:

  • Customer-focused companies outperformed the S&P 500 by 5 times (p. 29)
  • Examine your “defector pipeline” to find ways to stop the loss (p. 62)
  • Only break your brand promise if you’re willing to break your brand (p. 67)
  • A bad apology can make things worse; a good, sincere apology—backed up with proper action—can turn a disgruntled customer into a fan (pp. 67-72); base apologies in “humility, transparency, and a desire to learn” (pp. 285-286)
  • Act on employee ideas immediately when feasible (p. 119)
  • Remember your existing customers, who are too-often neglected even though they’re more profitable than new business (I’ve written about this as well)(p. 148)
  • Make sure your frontline staff can access ALL the information about problems and solutions (p. 159)—and welcome their input on better ways to address various issues; even think about honoring your employees in “mistake of the week” meetings (p. 204)
  • Understand that fans of yours who recommend you are likely to also recommend your competitors—giving you the opportunity to earn even more referrals as you discover why they recommend others and can earn their trust in those areas (p. 274)

She also has great examples of companies that reinvented one or more of these Ps, with particularly wonderful examples around management. I especially loved learning about Ricardo Semler, head of the Brazilian company Semco, which eliminated practically every aspect of traditional hierarchical management and has grown 40 percent per year.

There’s lots more. If you have a customer service staff, you’ll pick up some great tips from this book.

Recent Interviews & Guest Articles: 

Shel’s done 16 podcasts recently, ranging from 5 minutes to a full hour. Click here to see descriptions and replay links.
Connect with Shel

 

 

Find on Facebook

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of ten books…international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel), his newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, has already won two awards and is endorsed by Jack Canfield and Seth Godin. Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Going Beyond Sustainability, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He’s an International Platform Association Certified Speaker and was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.
He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).
“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

The Clean and Green Club, January 2017

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Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, January 2017
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Happy 2017. May we all come together for a better world. I worry greatly about the future of my country: the US. I recognize that this newsletter goes to people who may have very different politics than mine. I offer these first five paragraphs in a spirit of dialog. Even if you don’t agree with me, as a businessperson who cares enough about social responsibility to be on my list, you need to have a sense of what’s going on in your logical market. But if you really don’t want to know this, skip down to this month’s tip.

But I take hope in knowing that the power of social movements is stronger than the power of governments. We will continue to work for the environment, for social justice, for better conditions for all, and for a climate where bullying, misogyny, and racism are no longer acceptable—and I hope you join me.

Thus, my wife and I will be marching in the streets of Washington, DC on January 21, holding the new president’s feet to the metaphorical fire on Inauguration Weekend.

Similar rallies are being held in several major US cities. The Facebook page is https://www.facebook.com/events/2169332969958991/ and you can find one near you at https://www.womensmarch.com/sisters . Although they’re calling it a women’s march, they’ve made it very clear that men are welcome.

One easy specific action you can do if you agree is to Like the Facebook page 3NoTrump. Each week, my wife, daughter, and son-in-law provide three easy but meaningful actions you can do to not stand idly by: phone calls to make with the phone number and a sample script, copy-and-paste emails, that sort of thing. Already, we’ve been able to celebrate victory on a couple of the projects they’ve posted.

This Month’s Tip: How to Choose the Right Social Responsibility Path for Your Particular Business
The best types of CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) activities do all this:

  1. Dovetail closely with your company’s skills, capabilities, interests, and goals
  2. Make a measurable difference in global problems, e.g., turn hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war into peace, and/or catastrophic climate change into planetary balance—ideally, look for strategies that create multiple wins and address multiple goals
  3. Launch profitable products and services
  4. Open possibilities for new marketing initiatives

Helping companies figure this out is part of what I do. If you visit http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/d-i-y-do-it-yourself-resources/ , the first two links are self-assessments—one for social responsibility and one for green practices. Filling either or both out entitles you to 15 minutes of my time, via Skype or similar.

And here’s a real-world example, an excerpt from one of many case studies in my latest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World. To me, this is a “perfect storm of positivity” with wins all around: for the company, the purchaser, the dealer, the community, the environment, and the economy. The references to Polak, Warwick, and Prahalad are all explained earlier in that section.

Let There Be Light

d.light—one of the companies Polak and Warwick mention—simultaneously addresses poverty, education, air pollution/toxic fumes/health risks, energy savings, carbon footprint, and more—and makes a huge difference in lives of those at the bottom of the economic pyramid. All with a simple three-item product line.

Headquartered in San Francisco with additional offices in China, India, and Kenya, d.light sells inexpensive freestanding bright-light LED lanterns with lifetime batteries powered by dual solar/plug-in electric chargers. The company’s mission statement: “to create new freedoms for customers without access to reliable power so they can enjoy a brighter future.”

And to accomplish this mission, the company employs a deeply holistic analysis of the problems faced by people at the bottom of the heap, and how a reliable and renewable source of good light can help solve them.

The lights go into two types of environments: places where light has been supplied by kerosene (or, conceivably, open fires)—and those with no pre-existing night-time light source.

If the lantern replaces an existing kerosene model, it accomplishes many desirable goals: It provides a better quality of light that needs no fuel, does not produce toxic fumes, has no risk of setting the house on fire, reduces pollution, and leaves considerably more money in the hands of the family using the lantern—because the savings over purchasing kerosene typically pay for the lantern in about two months.

Where the lantern provides light in a previously unlit area, the benefits are different, but just as significant: four more hours per day of productive time. Children can advance much further with their studies; cottage industries, farms, and microbusinesses can produce and sell more. In short, the lamp becomes a ladder out of poverty.

Using classic Prahalad-inspired design principles, the units are cheap, extremely durable, and designed for multiple environments. A company video shows the lamps dropped from a high balcony and run over by a car, and still working afterward. At least one of the three models can be mounted on a wall or ceiling. The top-line model can also charge mobile phones. In developing countries, payment plans can be arranged for less than the previous monthly cost of kerosene; in developed countries, 10 percent of the proceeds funds lamps for children who could not buy them. Worldwide, they’re sold with a two-year free-replacement warranty.

Operating 6000 retail outlets in 40 countries, d.light is very successful, both financially and in the social and environmental good it has created. As of February 28, 2013, the company claims:

  • 13,638,438 “lives empowered”
  • 3,409,610 school-aged children reached with solar lighting
  • $275,817,462 saved in energy-related expenses
  • 3,589,490,280 productive hours created for working and studying
  • 656,952 tons of CO2 offset
  • 10,115,224 kWh generated from renewable energy

Build This Kind of Success Into Your Own Business

So how can you build this kind of profitable social change focus into your own business? Start by filling out one or both of those assessments at http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/d-i-y-do-it-yourself-resources/ , and get on the phone with me for 15 minutes at no charge. Wouldn’t you just love to start 2017 with a new focus on profitable social entrepreneurship?

Friends Who Want to Help
Over the past three years, I’ve worked closely with a remarkable business coach who has helped me wrap myself around the idea of thinking so big as to turn hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war into peace, and catastrophic climate change into planetary balance.

As I do once in a while, I’m sharing a note from her. Just because working with her has been transformational for me and might be for you. I am not compensated for any referrals to her. Doing this just to help her—and you.

“I work as a business and life coach and a Certified Hypnotherapist. Working on your goals and letting go of the thoughts and feelings no longer helpful to you assists you to move forward in your life and work and create wellbeing for yourself and for others. You can do these separately or combine them together. To see how they can assist you to go forward, call Oshana Himot, MBA, CHT, at 602-463-6797 or email oshanaben at yahoo.com ”

Hear and Meet Shel
I’ll be one of the featured experts on the Monetise Your Passion Summit with Rita Joyan, February 13-March 5. That’s not a typo; she’s Australian. In fact, she was named Canberra’s Young Business Woman of The Year for 2015. Canberra, you might know, is Australia’s capital. And I’m especially excited because the other experts are not the same old same old. I’ll be learning for the first time from people like:
  • Stephanie Leigh Mulac – how to build 6-7 figure businesses
  • David Essel –  known as The new leader of the positive thinking movement.
  • Jesse Brisendine – founder of the 1 year 1000 challenge
  • Ally Laporte – radio personality and parenting expert  – her radio program has 6 million listeners.

Look for a solo mailing about this with the full details around February 5, once I have them to share with you.

Also look for these upcoming podcasts (details when I have them):

  • With Internet marketer Willie Crawford
  • On the Positive Phil podcast “interviewing entrepreneurs and positive people” (I’m both)
  • With Kymm Nelsen on the Conscious Business Weekly podcast
  • With Alyssa Wright on the Leading Change podcast

I also expect to be moderating at least one panel at Ethical Corporation’s Responsible Business Summit in New York, March 27-28: http://events.ethicalcorp.com/rbs-usa/conference-agenda.php

And shortlisted/in negotiation with meeting planners at several other events, but none are definite yet. Possibilities include Chicago and Rapid City, South Dakota, among others.

I missed Book Expo America last year after attending every one since 1997. But it’s back in NYC and my daughter is NOT getting married the following week (as she did in 2016), so I expect to be attending (May 30-June 2). If there’s interest, perhaps we can organize a gathering.

Order your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Find out more and order from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies directly from me). http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
 
Download a free sampler with several excerpts, the complete Table of Contents and Index, and all the endorsements.
Another Recommended BookBorn on Third Base

Born on Third Base by Chuck Collins (Chelsea Green, 2016)

One-percenter Chuck Collins, an heir to the Oscar Meyer fortune who went to prep school with Mitt Romney, has written a dramatic and well-penned book on why wealthy people will benefit from getting out of their isolation bubble and getting down and dirty in social change organizing. It’s a great read, and a very provocative one—and it includes reader-friendly features including a resources list, detailed notes, and a thorough index (yay!). His primary audience is the wealthy themselves, with a secondary audience among organizers who would like to enlist one-percenters to work in and/or fund their efforts.

And he walks his talk. He gave away his own fortune, and he’s been community organizing on class and climate issues for more than 30 years.

Collins says many of the one percent are actually disadvantaged by their wealth. It binds them to a set of conventions and isolates them from meaningful community in the wider world. When he had a fire, the neighbors from the trailer park he’d organized came over with casseroles and offers of help. When he needs access to a tool, he can often borrow it. He notes that this kind of gift economy is additive, not zero-sum. Generosity creates more generosity; there are no losers if it’s done with balance and good intention.

But the wealthy, isolated in mansions within “gated communities and gated hearts,” don’t often experience those resilient and vibrant relationships. When they can buy whatever they want, they don’t bother to tap into those community resources. When the civic infrastructure fails them, they have the luxury to opt out and take advantage of for-profit private-sector alternatives—while the poor have to either suffer or agitate for change. Collins suggests instead that the wealthy stay and fight, “be the squeaky wheel,” and get results for the entire community. As an example, he organized to improve conditions at the local municipal swimming pool, rather than fleeing with his family to a private country club. He suggests forming “resilience circles” that build deep community while addressing neighborhood (and global) issues—and urges wealthy allies to tell their stories.

Wealthy people also have the resources to address systemic change through the economic system. As his late colleague Felice Yeskel said, they can work at “the intersection of personal change and system rewiring.” Collins is heavily involved in the climate movement, and he quotes a study showing that superior attention to climate risk correlates well with superior financial metrics. Thus, wealthy investors can choose to invest in conscious businesses. And the socially responsible investment sector is growing exponentially.

The one percent, he notes, is not a monolith. He divides the sector into five “neighborhoods”: substrata of class, ranging from “Affluentville,” with incomes in the $680,000 to $3 million range, on up to “Billionaireville,” a rarified enclave of just 540 households at the very top.

Many of those in the lower strata of the upper class are reachable, he says. Once they see the disconnect between their lives and the lives of others, once they understand the benefits that accrue by replacing purchasing power with real community, once they realize that when others climb out of poverty, it is not an attack on them—they will join and stay involved as long as they’re treated as human beings with something valuable to offer, and not just as either a human ATM machine or a target for class anger. He quotes social change theorist Gar Alperovitz: “You learn by engagement, not by hanging back.

And it’s in those risk-taking leaps that we find the excitement, the meaning of life.”

After more than 40 years of organizing and marketing for social and environmental change, a lot of his points were familiar to me. But one that wasn’t was his shocking chapter on charitable giving. Apparently, many family foundations are basically a way to scam out of paying taxes and do very little genuine charitable work. And this is part of how 22 percent of wealth now devolves to the one percent (most of it to the top 1/10 of 1 percent), more than doubling the 9 percent figure of 1978.

Collins is not anti-capitalist. But he distinguishes generative (healthy) capitalism from degenerative (unhealthy) manifestations. He shows numerous examples of how the wealth can make a difference day to day, and how wealthy people can grapple with their own issues around wealth. The book ends very powerfully, with his story of going back to his childhood community of Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, and discovering that he still had friends there whom he could turn into allies—he didn’t have to be alienated from others in the one percent just because he was working full-tine on social change and had given away his fortune.

And on the very last page, he shares an amazing metaphor: “Our job is to serve as hospice workers for the old world, the old story…and midwives to the new world, the new story.”

Disclosure: Chuck Collins and I lived in the same social change community in 1980-81. I didn’t know him well, but we traveled in the same circles.

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Recent Interviews & Guest Articles: 

Shel’s done 16 podcasts recently, ranging from 5 minutes to a full hour. Click here to see descriptions and replay links.
Connect with Shel


 

Find on Facebook

 

 

 

 

 

About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of ten books…international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.
He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).
“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

The Clean and Green Club, December 2016

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
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Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, December 2016
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Making the Business Case on Climate Change to Trump
Last month, I mentioned that I wrote to Trump and made a business case for continuing to honor Paris. You can read my open letter on GreenBiz.com, https:/www.greenbiz.com/article/making-business-case-climate-change-trump . Interestingly, I read recently that Leonardo DiCaprio had given Trump and his daughter copies of his video on climate change, which I believe makes a similar case.
This Month’s Tip: 10 Reasons to Build Social Responsibility into Your Business

When I’m interviewed, I find that most reporters and radio hosts have this idea that creating a socially response business is onerous. They think it adds costs, complexities and headaches—and many of them wonder why anyone would go through the “bother.”

Well, they got one part right. It does add a layer of complexity. But if you do it right, social entrepreneurship creates so many benefits! Consider a few of them:

  1. You generate consumer loyalty; customers feel good about supporting socially/environmentally responsible businesses, and are even willing to pay higher prices.
  2. Customers become allies in both product development and problem resolution.
  3. You create deep loyalty among your employees; they’re happy to go to work each day, and they brag about working at your firm. This improves productivity and employee retention. And that employee loyalty reduces training and onboarding costs; it even creates a pipeline to find new employees among your current employees’ friends and family.
  4. Customers, employees, suppliers, and distributors do some of your marketing for you.
  5. You’ll have an easier time raising capital. Your options will expand beyond traditional investors and banks to crowdsourcing. Consider entrepreneurial platforms like Kickstarter, GoFundMe, IndieGoGo, and Barnraiser—as well as sites dedicated to social change and environmental crowdfunding, such as https://startsomegood.com/ or https://www.ioby.org/ . You can also attract corporate sponsors and even grants.
  6. It’ll be much easier to find joint venture partnerships that leverage more than one organization’s skills for the benefit of all.
  7. As you start to go public about your social response efforts, you’ll be asked to share best practices as a speaker and/or writer (which have lots of benefits of their own).
  8. Media will be happy to tell your story—and you don’t have to pay to get that exposure.
  9. If you do screw up, you’ll have more latitude while you make it right.
  10. You lower both the risk and the weight of negative consequences from boycotts to lawsuits.

Isn’t all that worth some extra complexity?

Next month: How to Choose the Right Social Responsibility Path for Your Particular Business. And meanwhile, wishing you a very happy holiday season, whatever holiday you celebrate.

Hear and Meet Shel
Master marketer Willie Crawford interviews Shel Thursday, January 26 (rescheduled from December 1). And he will take questions live on the air. Watch next month’s newsletter for listening instructions.

Monday and Tuesday, March 28-29, I think I will be attending the Ethical Corporation conference in New York City, and moderating at least one session. Details not firmed up as of press time.

Order your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Find out more and order from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies directly from me). http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
 
Download a free sampler with several excerpts, the complete Table of Contents and Index, and all the endorsements.
Another Recommended BookPower and Love
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Power and Love: A Theory and Practice of Social Change by Adam Kahane (Berrett-Koehler, 2010)

I’ve been working for social and environmental change since 1969. That’s even longer than my time in marketing, which started in 1972. Back then, what I was marketing was my views on social issues, especially the Vietnam War.

During my early times of active organizing, I would have found this book incredible helpful. Much later, without knowing it, I used Kahane’s model in the most successful organizing I’ve ever been involved with: Save the Mountain, in my own town of Hadley, Massachusetts, US.

Kahane traces the evolution of his thinking through his direct involvement in all sorts of global struggles, from rebuilding South Africa after the end of apartheid to looking for peaceful solutions to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict to helping Guatemala and Colombia emerge from totalitarianism. Serious struggles, in other words. And he acknowledges that he did many things wrong before he discovered his key insight:

Power and love are the yin and yang of organizing. Neither one is        effective without its “opposite.” Either one by itself will        eventually evolve from a generative, positive focus at the start to        a degenerative, socially hostile outcome—but together, they help        us achieve great things.

You can look at this through an Eastern Taoist lens, as I did just now. But you can also frame it as a Germanic Hegelian or Marxian dialectic: power and love are the thesis and antithesis; their synthesis is positive social change. A third lens is one I learned studying comedy improv about ten years ago: replace either-or with both-and.

Whichever lens you look through, the combination of power and love is very effective. They balance each other, keep each other in check, and maintain a generative focus. And we need this kind of holistic approach to move forward.

Martin Luther King defined power as the ability to achieve a purpose (p. 12). Unchecked by love, power-to (positive, change-oriented) devolves into power-over (oppressive, protective of inequality). Paul Tillich notes (p. 46) that power-to destroys oppressive institutions, but power-over destroys people—sometimes in ways that are hard to see. Kahane says that his own wife, a South African and veteran of the struggle there, would rather deal with overt than covert racism (p. 48). But when love comes in to bring power into balance, you can achieve power-with, and real unity (p. 138). And that’s when things start to move forward.

Love can morph in similar ways. Validation of another can crumble into a stifling forced unity/false consensus (p. 49, p. 65, p. 92) or a state of mind that feels good but can’t change anything. But combining awareness of power relationships leads to a multipartisan (NOT bipartisan) approach (p. 118) that recognizes the need to collaborate with opponents—and you don’t have to like them in order to love them (p. 31).

Kahane suggests inquiring specifically about the power and love in any situation, and poses ten questions to determine who brings what into the mix (p. 73).

Although I took four pages of notes, I’m keeping this review short and deliberately omitting many of Kahane’s key points. Why? Because if you’re doing social change, or running a social change business, you will get far more out of Kahane’s ideas and experiences by spending a few hours with the book, and I want you to be able to apply the many powerful lessons I haven’t even touched upon.

But here’s a really good offer for you: I actually typed out my notes (something I almost never do) and if you read the book, I’ll share with you. Email me a receipt that shows you bought the book or a photo that shows you got it out of the library and I’ll send my notes so you get more value out of your reading.

Recent Interviews & Guest Articles: 

Shel’s done 16 podcasts recently, ranging from 5 minutes to a full hour. Click here to see descriptions and replay links.
Connect with Shel


 

Find on Facebook

 

 

 

 

 

About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of ten books…international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.
He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).
“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

The Clean and Green Club, November 2016

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
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Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, November 2016
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Donald Trump, Social Entrepreneurship, and YOU

I am finishing this newsletter less than 24 hours after Donald Trump was named the victor in the US presidential race. As someone who has spent my whole life defending the oppressed, combatting racism, sexism, ableism and other ingrained prejudice, and working to preserve our planet. I was disheartened to see a repudiation of everything I stand for.

But the work goes on. It will be harder under a Trump administration than it has been under Obama. We can expect rollbacks of the hard-fought climate protection agreement forged in Paris last year, as one example. I have actually written to Trump and made a business case for continuing to honor Paris. I’ll be making that public shortly and will link to it here next month—or you can watch for it on my Facebook feed.

One of my very few regrets in my life is not fighting harder against the 2000 election results (which, to me and many others, were deeply tainted). I will not make that mistake again. If you visit my Facebook profile and scroll back to November 9, you’ll see resources of organizations you can support. And you’ll see a press release called “How Can Social Entrepreneurs Still Thrive in a Trump America?”, also posted at http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/how-can-social-entrepreneurs-still-thrive-in-a-trump-america/

This Month’s Tip: How Long Do You Keep Marketing to “Dead” Prospects?

Conventional marketing wisdom tells you to keep purging your list, purging your list, purging your list. If they haven’t bought from you after so many months, out they go! Some businesses will even purge the ones who do buy, but haven’t bought “enough.” They chop out the clients who provide the bottom 10 or 20 percent of revenue each year, and concentrate on the bigger fish.

Here’s some UNconventional marketing wisdom: that’s a load of crap.

Consider this:

  • Some people take years to decide on a purchase
  • Purchases, especially of expensive products or services in the B2B (business-to-business) world, might require a very long sales cycle while you build trust
  • It’s not uncommon to move a sale through the “funnel” model, starting with a no-cost or very inexpensive information product, and moving through a series of products of increasing depth—building trust and a reputation as the expert—before finally landing the big sale.

Tonight, I was inspired to write this column because I listened to a webinar, and at the end of that webinar, I pulled out my credit card and bought an info product for $995. Maybe the most interesting thing about the purchase is where it came in my cycle of trust with the presenter and the organizer. I met the organizer in 1997 or 1998 and have consumed a lot of his no-cost offerings; I met the presenter online a couple of years later. I’d purchased very low-cost products from the organizer a few times (such as a one-day conference in the $59 range); I’d never bought anything from the presenter before this call, although I had listened to several of her previous webinars and actually had a no-cost consultation from her.

It’s very rare that I buy something priced higher than $100 or so through a webinar. But in this case,

  1. Buying this product will probably save me at least 20 hours of time—and (because it includes sample contracts and other documents) several hundred dollars in lawyer-review fees.
  2. The two principals had proven their value to me over time, by consistently providing great information.
  3. The presenter’s offer happened to coincide exactly with a new direction in my business.
  4. A risk-free 100% satisfaction promise made it a no-brainer. If it wasn’t what I expected, I could send it back.

The confluence of those four factors made it worth my while to drop a whole grand on this. Those conditions moved me from lookie-loo to buyer of a relatively expensive product. Those conditions hadn’t existed before.

As a service provider, I’ve also experienced this from the other side.

  • This summer, I had a $39,500 client and a $6,000 client. Both of those originally came to me several years ago, with a tiny little project that earned me a few hundred dollars. And both of them have dribbled a steady stream of small projects my way. The $6K client had done some larger projects with me, including one at $20K. If I remember correctly, the $40K client had not spent more than about $1,500 with me at once.
  • Two other clients I worked with this summer have consistently spent a few hundred dollars at a time, a few times a year, for several years.
  • My final big client this summer was a referral—from a client I worked with nine years ago!
  • I literally had a client contact me who had saved and filed an article in the Wall Street Journal about six years earlier that mentioned me.
  • Most of my largest projects in the 35 years I’ve run my business have grown out of previously completing a series of very small orders—pretty much everything except book contracts from publishers, and a few of my book-project-management gigs.

How much work would I have given up if I had purged these folks from my list because they hadn’t bought yet, or hadn’t bought enough yet?

How many people are you sending away just before they were finally ready to buy, or buy bigger?

Hear and Meet Shel
If you’re attending Suzanne Evans’ Build Your Speaking Biz conference in Atlanta, this Thursday, November 17 through Saturday, November 19, please introduce yourself. Better yet, send an email beforehand and we’ll try to meet up.

Thursday, December 1, 5 pm ET/2 pm PT, guest on Willie Crawford and Haddy Folivi’s entrepreneurial radio show.

Monday, December 5 is the likely release date for a really interesting and unusual interview with Jena Rodriguez on the Branding with Jena/Brave Entrepreneur podcast. This is the first time I think I’ve been asked about how I’ve been brave in my social change work (and I riffed about some of the people who are much braver than I am). We had a lot of fun, too.

Monday and Tuesday, March 28-29, I think I will be attending the Ethical Corporation conference in New York City, and moderating at least one session. Details not firmed up as of press time.

Order your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Find out more and order from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies directly from me). http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
 
Download a free sampler with several excerpts, the complete Table of Contents and Index, and all the endorsements.
Another Recommended BookTools for Grassroots Activists
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Tools for Grassroots Activists: Best Practices for Success in the Environmental Movement, Edited by Nora Gallagher and Lisa Myers

After two months in a row of reviewing corporate apologists, it’s refreshing to stumble on a grassroots handbook for action—published by a very different kind of corporation: Patagonia.

This is a book I wish I’d had access to in some of the organizing campaigns I’ve been involved with for the past 40 years. It’s full of diverse advice from activists in the trenches. Some of these are people we’ve heard of: Bill McKibben, author of several climate change classics and founder of 350.org…Jane Goodall, researcher and activist for chimpanzees…toxics activist Lois Gibbs (who took on Hooker Chemical over the contamination of Niagara Falls’ Love Canal neighborhood)…and of course, Patagonia’s amazing founder Yvon Chouinard, among others.

But most of them are known not so much by their names, but their deeds. They leave a trail of success. They have organized or actively participated in movements that saved threatened land. They have expertise in areas such as grassroots organizing, media relations, fundraising, lobbying…

Many of them have great advice about how to work with people who don’t share your values or lifestyles—engaging ranchers, ethnic or cultural communities, retailers, or commercial fishing operators in the areas where your purposes overlap, or winning over influential conservative politicians.

Reflecting on my own experience as the founding organizer of a group that successfully defeated a large development project on our local mountain in 1999-2000 and my participation in a few other successful movements, I found most of the advice was spot on.  Specifically: 

  • Look for common ground
  • Include business supporters and other stakeholders outside the environmental groups in victory celebrations
  • Stay focused on the big goals—don’t drown in minutiae
  • Be willing to negotiate a small reduction in your goals in order to vastly broaden your support base
  • Focus on stories instead of statistics.

Some provide cautionary tales about how NOT to do this work. For example, when John Sterling—now Executive Director of the Conservation Alliance—was Patagonia’s Director of Environmental Programs, he was pressured by an activist with a very short deadline to declare publicly in an ad that the company was not using products from old-growth forests. The activist gained the signatures of several other companies—but when logging interests declared a boycott on the listed firms, the activist hung them all out to dry. Needless to say, those executives who had gone out on a limb were a lot less receptive to future appeals from environmentalists; the activist had done more harm than good.

The book also introduced me to some new resources, or new ways of using familiar tools. I hadn’t been aware of Headwaters Economics, a think tank that researches the economic contributions of undeveloped natural resources and generally finds that they have contribute more to the economy than they do when they’re extracted. And it hadn’t occurred to me that Google Earth could be such a powerful tool to create visual aids such as time-lapse maps that track the melting of a glacier or the land-use impact of a rapidly developing city.

Surprisingly, the book doesn’t deeply address the issue of coalition partners getting caught up in fighting each other instead of focusing on the wider goal—but this is something I’ve experienced over and over again in progressive movements.

My favorite essay was Jane Goodall’s message of hope. She called for activists to celebrate the good news, and noted that there’s plenty of it. And her success story showed how a well-executed campaign could impact on multiple levels; her Roots and Shoots project manages to address habitat and species protection, youth empowerment, and bringing people out of poverty all at once. That’s just the kind of victory I love to celebrate in my books and talks.

Highly recommended.

Recent Interviews & Guest Articles: 

Shel’s done 13 podcasts recently, ranging from 5 minutes to a full hour. Click here to see descriptions and replay links.
Connect with Shel

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About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of ten books…international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.
He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).
“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

The Clean and Green Club, October 2016

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
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Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, October 2016
This Month’s Tip: Life-Work Balance? You Bet: How to Create More Hours in the Day
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I’m writing to you on the evening of October 4—just after the end of Rosh HaShana, the Jewish new year. Starting the previous month and going for several weeks until Simchat Torah a few weeks later (October 25, this year), Jews take time for reflection and renewal—peaking at Yom Kippur, which will have been a few days before you receive this. We spend a lot of time in synagogue or find other ways to get right with God and our fellow humans, apologize if necessary, reflect on the things we want to do better, and emanate positive energy about our directions in the year to come. We’ve been doing this a very long time; this year is 5777. We had more than a 1,000-year head start on the Chinese, who are in year 4013.

I personally don’t go to synagogue much. I did the Tashlich ritual twice of casting bread into moving water (traditionally, to represent the sins you want to get rid of—as I do it, the aspirations of what I’d like to do better): once with my kids, who came in for the holidays, and again with friends from our local Jewish community. I do plan to attend Kol Neidre services the evening before Yom Kippur (all Jewish days start the night before) and possibly some part of Yom Kippur itself.

And with all this reflection, I’m going to veer off my usual subjects of green and ethical business success, marketing, and book publishing—and talk a bit about WHY we work.

We work to live; we don’t live to work. Work provides the income that enable us to feed, house, and clothe our selves and our loved ones—and to experience some joys of a fulfilled life that are easier with money. We also work to create a better world, and for the satisfaction of doing something well. And of course, we each have other reasons.

I’ve talked a lot over the years about working—about my joy in using my writing, speaking, and consulting skills to make the world better. Today, I’m going to talk about the choices I’ve made to build in time NOT working—to keep my life in balance and build in time for things that matter.

Let’s start with exercise. My goal is to get 2 hours of it every day, with at least 1/3 outdoors. On non-travel days, I don’t go to bed until I’ve had at least one hour. And I track it—very simply. I write the number of minutes for the day on a paper calendar that I also use to track what books I’ve read, how many learning audios I’ve listened to, and of course, my appointments and to-do list. I find that tracking, even this informally, inspires me to do more. September, for instance, was a particularly good month. I got 3722 total minutes of exercise, or average of 124 minutes per day—above my goal despite two travel days. Three days I only managed between 94-110 minutes, and the 94 was one of my two travel days that month. The other 27 days, I got between 120 and 151 minutes each day.

Reading and learning are other things I make time for. In September, I read seven books (six of them at my exercise bike) and listened to 24 learning audios—more than usual, thanks to a really good telesummit.

Travel, arts, and time with friends and colleagues are also important to me. I got to New York once in September to attend a conference at the UN—and to visit my daughter and her husband. I had scheduled two trips to Boston, one to see my son perform a solo concert and once to meet a client. Both trips were to include visiting my son. But my wife got sick, so we watched his concert on a livestream, from home. Then my client canceled her trip east.

Even skipping my son’s performance, I made it to seven live cultural events last month: four concerts, one play, and two agricultural festivals. And yes, I watched the first presidential debate. I also attended two professional networking functions and scheduled two one-on-one meetings with new colleagues. Add to this an hour or two a day of online networking.

I travel quite a bit. While September had only the one overnight, in the past twelve months I’ve had three major trips of five to 20 days: to Texas, China, and eastern Canada—and at least a dozen shorter ones, to Boston, NYC, Vermont, and Rhode Island. In the next few weeks, I’m visiting family in Denver (and meeting a new business contact) and attending a conference in Atlanta. We’re going to Thailand in January.

Typically, I get about 6 hours of sleep most nights—getting up between 5:40 and 6:30 a.m. and heading to sleep between 11:30 and midnight. Most days, I squeeze in one or two very short naps (30 seconds to ten minutes). Cooking is fun for me, and I usually cook at least three dinners per week for my wife and myself (and, frequently, guests), as does she.

And of course, I spend several hours most weekdays either on direct client projects, admin, and/or on steering my business toward where I’d like it to be (following a shift in emphasis three years ago). But I don’t let the work subsume my reasons for living my life.

How about you? What do you do to regenerate yourself? What are your priorities outside of your work? How much time do you allocate per week to making yourself a better or more complete person? Use the comment field at the bottom to tell us. Maybe it will even lead to connecting with other readers.

Next month, I promise, we’ll be back to a direct focus on business. Next month’s lead article is called Marketing to “Dead” Prospects.

Hear and Meet Shel
Wed. 11/2, 1 pm ET/10 a.m. PT: “Impossible is a Dare: Leveraging Business to Heal the World,” webinar co-sponsored by Green America and Transformpreneur. http://events.transformpreneur.com/index.php/event-registration-5/ Green America is a great organization, and my charity partner for my last two book launches.

I’m taping postcast interviews with both Ajay Prasad on Founder’s Corner and Jena Rodriguez on the Brave Entrepreneur podcasts. See next issue for playback links.

Tues. 11/8, 6 pm ET: First meeting of Western Massachusetts Global Marketers. This is a new group of entrepreneurs who market nationally or internationally and are based in Western Massachusetts. By invitation only. If you think you should be invited, give me a call at 413-586-2388 (8 a.m. to 10 p.m. US Eastern) and tell me about yourself.

Tues. 11/8: If you’re a US citizen, please VOTE! If you want your vote to support the Paris accord and other action on catastrophic climate change—which for me is a very key issue—consider the Democratic Party position of strong support for reducing carbon output and gradually (too gradually) moving toward a clean, renewable economy vs. the Republican position of denial, hostility, and reversal of the small steps we’ve taken. And consider that even if the climate skeptics are right (and I see plenty of evidence in storms like Katrina, Rita, Irene, Sandy, and Matthew that they are very wrong)—we still get to lower our energy bills, increase our comfort, reduce dependence on foreign powers, and clean up our lungs. Reversing and retrogressing back to fossil and nuclear is stepping away from the future we all want.

Wed. 11/9 (telesummit starts 11/1—don’t wait for my call, this is great stuff): Nicole Holland interviews me on her Building Business Rockstars telesummit. Proud to say I’m in awesome company of rockstars including Marisa Murgatroyd, Dorie Clark, Lou Bortone, and several other very cool people. You’ll want to listen to the whole series. No charge to sign up: http://shelhorowitz.com/go/rockstars/ Plus, you get to see the incredible job Nicole did putting together the visually stunning, highly informative workbook (really a combination brochure and learning tool. Even if you hate listening to teleseminars, you should visit that URL and pick up your copy. A lot of learning there both in the content and in the presentation. The calls run November 1-10.

Wed. 11/16: If you are in Atlanta and want to get together in the late afternoon or evening, I will have some free time. Call me (phone number above) no later than November 10.

Thu.-Sat. 11/17-19: I’ll be attending Suzanne Evans’ and Larry Winget’s Build Your Speaking Biz event in Atlanta—and I have ONE ticket to give away. Visit http://buildyourspeakingbizbootcamp.com/ — and let me know right away if you want to go. First person to respond gets the link for a comp.

Friends/Colleagues who Want to Help
These days, we’re all bombarded with marketing messages–most of which are digital and lack a personal touch. 
 
By accurately replicating handwriting, Thankster gives marketers a unique advantage through personalized handwritten cards. The result? Happier customers and higher conversion rates. http://shelhorowitz.com/go/thankster/

Order your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Find out more and order from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies directly from me). http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
 
Download a free sampler with several excerpts, the complete Table of Contents and Index, and all the endorsements.
Another Recommended BookThe Surprising Solution
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The Surprising Solution: Creating Possibility in a Swift and Severe World by Bruce Piasecki (Sourcebooks, 2009)

Here’s another insider’s approach: a book on deep sustainability by a consultant immersed in the world of multinational corporations. It’s well written, thoroughly researched, and in some ways, reader-friendly—with a good index and a long list of recommended books, websites, and other resources. And there’s a lot of substance. I took five full pages of notes.
Among his key points:
  • Sustainability, when done the right way, is good for business (which is now common wisdom.
  • The progress a business makes toward environmental AND economic sustainability is shaped like the letter S; it has upslopes and downslopes. Innovation puts a company on the upslope; things like ethics violations and environmental issues (as well as more 101 stuff like missing the right market) are among the forces pushing down. 
  • Businesses need to think and act for the long term; short-term thinking is short-sighted and forces us to keep on a path that destroys resources and hurts humans, instead of the “social response capitalism” (SRC) he favors. However, the culture, legal structures and governance of most corporations make this more difficult than it should be.
  • While government can play a crucial role, the deepest changes originate within a company (p. 230).
  • Consumers also have a role. When we recognize our power, companies had better pay attention.
  • We have many lessons to learn from the largest corporations; as these lessons trickle down, we’re better able to preserve the planet while making a good profit.
For Piasecki, SRC companies (pp. 43-44):
  1. Create superior, socially responsible “products that bridge the gap between traditional expectation of performance and price and social impactthat respond to legitimate, emerging social pressures and needs” such as eliminating toxics, replacing waste with reusability, etc. 
  2. Stop ignoring externalities and understand that social good builds “the long-term viability of entire product lines” 
Piasecki consistently reinforces the idea that doing the right thing is good for business (as I’ve “preached” for two decades). He cites several benefits for SRC corporations, including lower costs/higher margins, reducing the production cycle time, access to global markets, product differentiation, making products more valuable through their social impact, and reducing risk (pp. 55-56).

Much of his analysis is based on in-depth case studies of two of his client companies: Toyota and HP. Smaller case studies include the Gap clothing chain and the Canadian oil company Suncor (an example that I believe needs to be updated substantially).

I was particularly interested in the HP case study because of its emphasis on how one of the world’s largest companies is addressing Bottom-of-the-Pyramid economies with low-priced, dependable machines and business models adapted to markets with near-zero purchasing power pp. 152-177). (See my review about ten years ago of The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid (scroll down, and if you got here through my email newsletter, you’re already a subscriber)).

Near the end (p. 241), Piasecki poses three questions that every manufacturing company should examine:
  1. What is enough?
  2. How do we make superior, energy-efficient products?
  3. What’s the best way to revitalize manufacturing in this “smaller and more severe world?”
While I found the book quite useful and was glad to see it reinforces many of the principles in my own books including Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, I found I could only digest a little at a time. After five or ten pages, I would stop. It took me about two months to make it all the way through.
In reading, I also needed to keep my date filtering antennae up. Most of the book (originally published in 2007) was written before the market collapse, although he revised for a 2009 edition. And all of it was before the new (and scary) technologies such as fracking sharply dropped the price of fossil fuels—with major consequences for some of his theories and models.
Recent Interviews & Guest Articles:

Five-minute interview on Jennings Wire: “How Ordinary People Can Do The Extraordinary” How ordinary people start and lead movements—and how Shel saved a mountain in his own town. http://www.jenningswire.com/authors/podcast-how-ordinary-people-can-do-the-extraordinary/

Mike Schwager: http://wsradio.com/051916-guerrilla-marketing-heal-world-shel-horowitz/
How I got started in social/environmental change at age 3 and returned to it (for life) at age 12. Dialog with Jack Nadel, 92-year-old entrepreneur with a green product line. The easiest ways a business can go green—and the real 7-figure savings that are possible when counting all the costs. Why market share doesn’t matter, and how to partner with competitors

Western Massachusetts Business Show with Ira Bryck, http://whmp.com/podcasts/western-mass-business-show-4-9-16/ Profiles of several companies that were founded to good in the world. Green companies as price leaders. How to get a copy of my $9.95 ebook, Painless Green: 111 Tips to Help the Environment, Lower Your Carbon Footprint, Cut Your Budget, and Improve Your Quality of Life—With No Negative Impact on Your Lifestyle at no cost.

Bill Newman: http://whmp.com/podcasts/the-101-best-dingers-in-baseball/ (segment starts at 28:28): A quick, intense 11-minute trip through the highlights of my work

Ask those Branding Guys: http://santafe.com/thevoice/podcasts/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world (segment starts at 9:23)

Barry Moltz: http://barrymoltz.com/2016/05/375-jay-baer-says-hug-haters-green-movement-continues-federal-contracting-opportunities-small-business/ (segment starts at 15:12)

Todd Schinck, Intrepid Now, with a nice emphasis on the power of ordinary people to change the world: http://intrepidnow.com/authors/shel-horowitz-combining-principles-profits-grow-business-heal-world/ (segment starts at 2:28)

JV Crum, Conscious Millionaire, second interview: We cover my first activist moment at age 3, how I helped save a mountain, the next big environmental issue, and how a simple vow in my 20s changed my life http://consciousmillionaire.com/shelhorowitz2/ (segment starts at 3:25)

Jill Buck, Go Green Radio: http://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/92012/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world (segment starts at 0:52). The difference between socially responsible and socially transformative businesses, impact of a social agenda on employees, urban farming, new energy technologies…and a cool case study of how a dog groomer could green up.

Kristie Notto, Be Legendary: The perfect example of a business that addresses social issues, the hidden revenue model I showed a social entrepreneur, how a famous gourmet food company went head-to-head with a much larger competitor, what we can learn about engineering from nature, and why wars are solvable http://traffic.libsyn.com/belegendarypodcast/Be_Legendary_Podcast_-_Shel_Horowitz_for_itunes.mp3

Guest on Leon Jay, Socialpreneurtv http://socialpreneur.tv/building-better-products/guerilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world (you’ll get to see what I look like when I’m overdue for a haircut/beard trim—a rare glimpse at Shaggy Shel)

Two-part interview on Steve Sapowksy’s excellent EcoWarrior Radio podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/pt.-1-guerrilla-marketing/id1080237490?i=363550688&mt=2/ (Listen to Part 1 before Part 2, of course)

The first of two excellent shows on Conscious Millionaire http://consciousmillionaire.com/shelhorowitz/

Connect with Shel


 

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About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of ten books…international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.
He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).
“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

The Clean and Green Club, September 2016

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
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Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, September 2016
Exercise your brain for a good, green cause: Visit http://greenandprofitable.com/lets-have-some-fun-with-a-stillborn-nuke-a-contest and enter your fun/outrageous AND your most practical ideas for what to do with a nuclear power plant that is never going to be finished. The best one in each category get a bunch of goodies from me as well as media publicity.
This Month’s Tip: Event Planning and Marketing Lessons from a Wedding, Part 3
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Marketing/addressing audience needs
The first two parts of this three-part series focused on the logistics of a complex event. But typically, you have an event in order to further your organization. So even if it’s only for your own employees, it serves a marketing purpose. This final installment will look at the marketing aspects.

As a Vendor, Be Agile and Adaptable

The caterer we chose was remarkably flexible, and that’s why this organization—a high-end restaurant in the area—got hired. My daughter is vegetarian, gluten-free, and rice-free. Her first criterion was that she could eat all the food. As a trained chef and food blogger (see her yummy recipes at http://TheSmilingOnion.com), her second was that all the food conformed to her own tastes.The restaurant chef was willing to

  • Do a tasting of the exact proposed menu in the restaurant, and even surprised us with an elegant custom-printed menu just for the four of us who attended
  • Modify her recipes based on Alana’s suggestions following the tasting
  • Negotiate the scope of services

And that’s why they got a $12,000 gig. Another caterer disqualified herself by being rigid; she was not willing to adjust her recipes or her policies to meet our needs.

Be Accessible and Communicative—Build Client Confidence in You

Two other caterers lost out because one of them never returned multiple phone calls, and the other (the least expensive) would take weeks to answer email and his answers lacked understanding of our needs. Even though he would have saved us thousands of dollars, we weren’t convinced of his ability to serve us.

There were communication issues on our end, too. For example, Bobby and Alana ordered compostable plates, cutlery, and napkins—but no one thought to communicate with the catering staff about how waste would be handled. So compostable dishes, food waste, and general trash all got lumped together and hauled off to the dump. Ooops!

As a Client, Find Out What Can Be Negotiated

The restaurant’s catering staff originally returned an estimate of $22,000. We cut that almost in half by negotiating down from what they originally planned to include; we rented our own chairs, tables, tablecloths, and tents, brought in our own liquor (which we paid their certified bartender to serve) and ice, and supplied high-end compostable plates and cutlery. Even adding back in the $3,000 we spent to obtain these items elsewhere, we saved $9,000—and they still got $12,000 (by far the largest expense).

As a Marketer, Be Creative but Stay on Message

Alana and Bobby wanted a wedding that represented who they are, individually and as a couple. They themed the entire event as a Broadway musical, complete with a Playbill and brief clips from several musicals. They wrote their own vows, scripted and rehearsed a ballroom dance, chose an officiant who would honor their cultural and personal traditions.

The finished wedding canopy

Build in Interactivity and Social Media

The wedding couple provided numerous ways for attendees to get involved, starting some months ahead by asking people to decorate a square for the wedding canopy they would be standing under (a traditional Jewish custom). They also built in several events around the wedding itself, ranging from a pizza/taco party the night before to a hike or drive up our local mountain, with its 4-state view at the top, the day after. They created a fun website just for the wedding, providing not just logistical information but two fanciful stories of their coming together. They encouraged attendees to take pictures and post them on a specific page of a photo website. And of course, there were numerous posts and new friend connections on Facebook (the right social media network for this type of event). A table was set up with Polaroid cameras and a hand-made guest book.

Honor Diversity

This wedding brought together a conservative Anglo-Mexican Christian family from Texas and a liberal Jewish family originally from NYC but living in rural New England for 35 years. Friends and family came from a dozen states. Ages ranged from preteen to people in their 80s. This diversity was reflected in the wedding ceremony, the menu, and the music (the band learned two klezmer and one mariachi songs for the occasion). Diversity was also honored in Dina’s and my decision to personally cook for the six of my relatives attending who kept Kosher—after discovering that the caterer’s option was frozen dinners that she described as similar to airplane food. We cooked four courses and supplemented that with some properly certified houmous (you may know it by its usual English spelling of “hummus”—my spelling is closer to the way it’s pronounced in its original Arab culture), cheese, and crackers. The effort we made to make sure that everyone felt welcome regardless of religion, politics, or culture was clearly appreciated by all who attended.

Honor Your Commitments—and Go the Extra Mile

The liquor store we chose had already promised to take back unopened bottles. When our ice vendor fell through a week before the wedding, we called the liquor store. The owner cheerfully agreed to sell us ice, and deliver both the ice and the booze the day of the wedding, for a very reasonable price. There was no problem returning the extras and she even waited to be paid until after the event, rather than collecting our money and refunding an unknown chunk of it. That liquor store now has our party business (and our recommendations) pretty much forever.

By contrast, the shuttle van service we hired did not honor its commitment. Both the runs back from the venue to the hotel drop-off points were made substantially earlier than the agreed time, and with no warning from the driver. As a result, three people had to stay at the site overnight instead of in their hotel rooms, and we negotiated the service to half of the agreed price, because we felt only half the service (transportation TO the wedding) had been properly provided. That company will never get a call from us again.

One final lesson: Use your powers of observation and treat everything as a learning experience. If I can get three months worth of marketing advice for you out of just one event, you can find lessons all around you.

Hear and Meet Shel
I’ll be a guest on Nicole Holland’s Business Building Rockstar Summit sometime the first 10 days of November. We taped an AWESOME deep-dive interview–and I’m in awesome company of rockstars including Marisa Murgatroyd, Dorie Clark, Lou Bortone, and several other very cool people. Each call will be available at no charge for 48 hours. If I don’t have it nailed down by press time for the October newsletter, I’ll send out a special bulletin when I have the details.

Also in November, I’ll be a guest on Jena Rodriguez’s The Brave Entrepreneur podcast. Details next month.
Friends/Colleagues who Want to Help
These days, we’re all bombarded with marketing messages–most of which are digital and lack a personal touch.

By accurately replicating handwriting, Thankster gives marketers a unique advantage through personalized handwritten cards. The result? Happier customers and higher conversion rates. http://shelhorowitz.com/go/thankster/

Order your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Find out more and order from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies directly from me). http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
 
Download a free sampler with several excerpts, the complete Table of Contents and Index, and all the endorsements.
Another Recommended Book—Connect
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Connect: How Companies Succeed by Engaging Radically with Society by John Browne (with Robin Nuttall and Tommy Stadlen) (Public Affairs Books, 2015)

Yes, I’m recommending this book by the former CEO of BP—but there’s much in here I disagree with, and I want to get that out of the way first.

Browne has a big set of blinders. He shows an awful lot of reluctance to question technology, even going so far as to embrace highly dangerous technologies like fracking, pesticide-saturated GMO crops, and nuclear power. And while I agree with him that business can be a major part of the solution to our toughest problems—like hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change—I’m less convinced than he is that business opposition to regulation is necessarily coming from a principled place.

Browne was no longer the CEO during BP’s massive Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, having left three years before. He watched from afar as his corporate child withered under the helm of Tony Hayward, who had told an audience at Stanford a year before the spill, “We had too many people that were working to save the world”—and notoriously pleaded, “I want my life back,” during the Deepwater crisis.

However, Browne was in charge during the 2005 Texas City refinery explosion that killed 15 people and an Alaska oil spill the following year (p. 121). To his credit, he understands that these incidents damaged BP’s stature and credibility, so when the rig exploded in the Gulf, the reservoir of goodwill had been sorely depleted.

So there’s a lot to set aside, and you’ll want to take this one with at least a spoonful of salt. Still, it provides a remarkable look into what it means to be a “forward-thinking” CEO of one of the largest fossil energy companies in the world—and the book contains good doses of both insight and wisdom, even if you have to filter out a good deal. He also interviewed many other big-company CEOs including Hank Paulson (later US Treasury Secretary) and Lloyd Blankfein of Goldman Sachs, Satya Nadella of Microsoft, and Indra Nooyi of Pepsico (among many others).

He points out that seeing business as the villain is nothing new; it dates back at least to the Han Dynasty in China, a century before Christ was born (p. 3). Browne includes a great deal of (very disturbing) detail on the racist, brutal, all-powerful imperialism of the British East India Company—the first modern corporation (pp. 49-57)—and of Cecil Rhodes’ equally barbaric activities in Africa (pp. 36-38).

And using business to achieve social good is nothing new either. Chocolate barons George and Richard Cadbury (UK) and Milton Hershey (US) set up humane conditions right from the get-go and saw their companies as benevolent intervenors, providing excellent working and living conditions (pp. 21-28). Henry Heinz was a strong advocate of food labeling laws, knowing that his preservative-free catsup using quality tomatoes would do better than his sodium benzoate-containing catsups of his competitors (pp. 42-43). Even many of the worst of the Robber Barons—like Andrew Carnegie and Henry Frick—men with blood on their hands and horrible working conditions for their employees—tried to rehabilitate their reputations through massive philanthropy (pp. 17-21).

What about our current century? Browne says the CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) department is an outmoded concept; siloing social responsibility doesn’t create effective change. Enron, he points out (p. 139) had a great CSR-focused mission statement. Real change has to percolate throughout the organization: in the C-suite, in operations, in marketing…not just in its own department.

And when we have this integration, he sees incredible rates of progress. He says US industry can easily reduce carbon emissions 3 percent per year, meet the 2°C limit on climate warming just by going after “cost-negative” (in other words, profitable) low-hanging fruit, and save $190 billion a year in the process (p. 88). A great example is the way Paul Polman turned Unilever around when he became CEO, with his Sustainable Living Plan:

To double the size of the business while helping 1 billion people to improve their health and well-being, halving the environmental footprint, and enhancing suppliers’ lives. Each of these three goals is directly related to Unilever’s core business activities… By using its Lifebuoy brand to improve hygiene habits, the company sells more soap and helps to cut in half the number of people who die from diseases such as diarrhoea. By investing to reduce carbon emissions and water usage, it lowers costs and minimizes its exposure to water scarcity, an issue that poses a serious risk to consumer-goods firms… (p. 158)

We already know Browne is an unabashed booster of technology. Technology contributes heavily to Browne’s view of the three most important trends that are changing the business world: artificial intelligence, a shift of the economic center of gravity from the US and Europe to Asia, and the growth of the global consumer (pp. 213-246). While I don’t share Browne’s unmitigated embrace of technology, I agree that when used properly, technology empowers people, moves them out of poverty, and cleans the environment all at once. As one example, he cites the very positive impact of mobile phone access on the fishing communities of Kerala, India (pp. 108-109). I also agree with his strong emphasis on open communication, collaborative culture, and including all stakeholders—and, of course, that business will not only be instrumental in solving these enormous challenges, but does and will benefit enormously by doing so.

Business actively contributed to many of these problems in the first place—of the top six social problems, he sees four—smoking, obesity, alcoholism, and climate change—as created by business (pp. 243-244). I’d say that another of the six, war/terrorism/violence, is largely a corporate creation as well. This is a moral justification for business working to fix them; there’s also the practical reason that fixing them can help the bottom line.

Finally, he concludes the book with a call for justice, based in corporate self-interest:

Mistreating any constituent of society eventually leads to collapse, while successful connection is rewarded with lasting commercial success…Future global development will be constrained just as badly if business is hamstrung by the hate it generates so self-destructively…I am optimistic that companies will be an enormous force for good in the future…The connected firms of the future will push the boundaries of human possibilities in their quest to contribute. They will not fracture their bonds with society (pp. 247-248).

 

Recent Interviews & Guest Articles: 

Shel’s done 13 podcasts recently, ranging from 5 minutes to a full hour. Click here to see descriptions and replay links (scroll all the way down to Recent Interviews & Guest Articles).

Connect with Shel


 

Find on Facebook

 

 

 

About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of ten books…international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).
“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

The Clean and Green Club, August 2016

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
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Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, August 2016
This Month’s Tip: Event Planning and Marketing Lessons from a Wedding, Part 2
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Logistics and operations—What we could have done better

event planning and marketing lessons from a wedding

Early Arrivals Trying to Keep Warm

Last month, I shared some of the logistical things we did right. But there were other things we could have been a lot more prepared for.

Work with Experienced Venues
Some of the problems we had were because this was only the third wedding they’d ever done. The first was the site owner’s own large wedding, but that had been more than 20 years earlier; she didn’t remember how she’d handled the specifics. And the second was a much smaller event for her housemate. So we were the first large-scale outside wedding they’d done in 20+ years. Several issues arose because nobody knew to raise them ahead of time.

Plan for the Unexpected
June in our part of New England is usually quite warm and buggy. We’d rented cooling fans and brought in several gallons of drinking water as well as bug protection—but the day of the wedding it was in the low 50s and windy. We didn’t need fans and the water, and we didn’t need to worry about bugs—but women guests in thin summer dresses with bare shoulders were shivering during the ceremony. My wife had called me from the site some hours earlier to tell me to bring every sweater we owned, and we passed them out during the reception—but we didn’t have them available at the ceremony, where they would have been eagerly used. The grandparents in their 80s spent a lot of the reception in the main house, which (unlike the rented reception tent) was heated. The rest of us finally got warm when the dancing started. The cold also cooled the food very quickly once it was off the serving table and onto a plate. And I realized during the reception that if it had rained, our contingencies were not adequate. The one tent we’d rented for the reception would not have been practical for the ceremony. Luckily, it was a gorgeous sunny day and that wasn’t an issue.

Revisit the Venue in the Right Season—Notice the Weak Points—Know What Questions to Ask
We encountered several very stressful surprises in the weeks leading up to the wedding. The worst of these was the site owner telling us that she didn’t think the house electricity would be enough for our needs. We brought in an electrician she had worked with before, and he gave us a $1500 estimate to put in temporary circuits for the reception area and take them out again afterward. Yikes! Luckily, we consulted with two other electricians and asked them about alternatives. Someone suggested we simply bring in generators, and that’s what we did—renting them for $300 including delivery and takeaway.

Making a site visit to meet the electrician just three weeks before the ceremony, we discovered a serious problem with black flies—something that we hadn’t thought about when we’d tromped through the snow in 20°F temperatures on our first visit. This time, the site owner met us wearing a face net! Fortunately, there was time to purchase 100 citronella bracelets and some citronella candles and incense sticks—which, as it turned out, we didn’t need because the same high winds that chilled the guests (and the food) kept the bugs away.

On that same visit, the owner raised her concern about overwhelming her septic system. We agreed to bring in a portapotty, but the wedding program didn’t mention it, I never knew where it was, and I don’t think it was used much except by the campers. Had we known ahead about needing extra electrical and toilet capacity, we would have negotiated on the price of the venue.

If I were doing an event like this in the future, I’d get everything spelled out in writing about what the venue was providing and what was expected of us.

Have a Point Person Onsite and Unload Systematically, in the Presence of the Point Person
Hire one person who knows where everything is and needs to be, has a checklist of what’s needed by whom, and coordinates what has to happen when. Introduce this person to all outside contractors and to everyone bringing in supplies. We didn’t do this, and a lot of things slipped through. Multiple drivers brought up loads of stuff and unloaded them wherever. People didn’t know that items they were waiting for had arrived, or where they were, or whom to ask. One consequence was that the bar never received the cranberry juice it needed to mix certain drinks, and another was the shuttle driver not communicating that he was taking a few people back to town—which resulted in others being stranded at the site. It would have also been helpful to the site owner to have one person she could talk to as issues arose.

In Part 3 of this series, we’ll move from logistics to marketing.

Hear and Meet Shel
INTERVIEW ON BUSINESS BUILDING ROCKSTARS WITH NICOLE HOLLAND, Friday, August 19, midnight ET, 9 p.m. PT: http://bbrshow.com/podcast/068/

Sunday, August 28, 9-10 a.m. ET/6-7 a.m. PT: Eric Moncrief interviews Shel on The Talk with Green Guy Show, WGST 640AM/iHeart Radio, Atlanta, online at http://www.iheart.com/live/Talk-Radio-640-WGST-6066/

Order your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Find out more and order from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies directly from me). http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
 
Download a free sampler with several excerpts, the complete Table of Contents and Index, and all the endorsements.
Another Recommended BookBiomimicry
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Biomimicry: Innovation Inspired by Nature by Janine M. Benyus

Since I’ve watched videos of several of Benyus’s wonderful talks (including at least one TED), I thought I knew what to expect: a look at how nature can teach us the solutions to all sorts of human engineering problems, because nature has solved them eons ago. And nature has consistently done this with just sunlight and materials on hand, no special chemistry, pressure, or external energy source other than renewable clean ones, and no waste that isn’t used by some other organism for another process. Consider, for instance, spider webs: made from water and dead flies, using six different types of silk, a web is five times as strong as steel, and has five times the impact resistance of bullet-proof Kevlar, while stretching 30% farther than nylon. A web made by a human-size spider would be able to catch a moving jet plane, she says (pp. 129-130, 1998 paperback edition).

Published in 1997 and thus older than the talks, the book certainly contains some of this. Perhaps the most dramatic example is in solar power itself. Benyus points out that all green leafy plants and many bacteria are more efficient solar collectors than anything we humans have come up with. “Though [photosynthesizing organisms] use only about 2 percent of the sunlight that reaches the Earth, they make the most of it, achieving an astounding 95 percent quantum efficiency” (p. 260). So far, the best we humans have done is 46%, in an experimental array (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_cell_efficiency). Typical commercial panels are in the 12-17% range (http://sroeco.com/solar/most-efficient-solar-panels/), so only about a fifth as good as a plant, even while requiring very complex, energy- and resource-intensive manufacturing.

But I wasn’t expecting the deep dive into chemistry, biology, and what she calls “industrial ecology,” and the wide net of applications for harnessing our growing knowledge. For instance, when we get past the limits of silicon-based computing to biological (p. 223) and molecular (p. 234) computing models, “a DNA computer could perform more operations in a few days than all the calculations ever made by all the computers ever built—and with a billion-fold increase in energy efficiency, and similar reduction in physical size.

Ecology, she says, is basically a form of accounting: making sure all the inputs and outputs zero out (p. 50). And that includes costing out not just any individual process but the entire lifecycle (p. 243). Benyus challenges us to incorporate these ten lessons (pp. 254-277) into all our human endeavors, and offers many examples of each:

  • Use waste as a resource
  • Diversify and cooperate to fully use the habitat
  • Gather and use energy efficiently
  • Optimize rather than maximize
  • Use materials sparingly [and let them serve multiple purposes]
  • Don’t foul their nests
  • Don’t draw down resources
  • Remain in balance with the biosphere
  • Run on information
  • Shop locally [meaning use local resources and inputs, a non-commercial version of shopping]

Number 2 in the above list is part of the reason why she calls monocropping (as most humans grow plants) a suicidal disaster. But she calls us to get past this unsustainable model, noting, for ex ample, that “diversity is also the cheapest and best form of pest control” (p. 26) and that we have life-friendly alternatives to “heat, beat, and treat,” even for making complex materials—as nature does with mussels, rhinos, and more (p. 97).

She also lists “four steps to a biomimetic future” (pp. 287-295); I might call them four stages:

  • Quieting: Immerse ourselves in nature
  • Listening: Interview the flora and fauna of our own planet
  • Echoing: Encourage biologists and engineers to collaborate, using nature as model and measure (this includes asking questions like “Does it run on sunlight? Does it use only the energy it needs? Does it fit form to function? Does it recycle everything? Does it reward cooperation? Does it bank on diversity? Does it use local expertise? Does it curb excess from within? Does it tap the power of limits? Is it beautiful?
  • Stewarding: reserve life’s diversity and genius

One key takeaway embodied in her second list, and especially stages 3 and 4, is that solutions are situational. The way nature solves the same problem in a tropical rainforest, a midwestern prairie, and an arid desert will be unique to those environments. They can scale within their own ecosystem, but they may not travel well.

This book is quite complex but despite the advanced science, pretty readable. And a great expander of the sense of what actually is possible by emulating nature in every facet of human activity.

Recent Interviews & Guest Articles: 
Five-minute interview on Jennings Wire: “How Ordinary People Can Do The Extraordinary” How ordinary people start and lead movements—and how Shel saved a mountain in his own town. http://www.jenningswire.com/authors/podcast-how-ordinary-people-can-do-the-extraordinary/

 

Mike Schwager: http://wsradio.com/051916-guerrilla-marketing-heal-world-shel-horowitz/
How I got started in social/environmental change at age 3 and returned to it (for life) at age 12. Dialog with Jack Nadel, 92-year-old entrepreneur with a green product line. The easiest ways a business can go green—and the real 7-figure savings that are possible when counting all the costs. Why market share doesn’t matter, and how to partner with competitors

 

Western Massachusetts Business Show with Ira Bryck, http://whmp.com/podcasts/western-mass-business-show-4-9-16/ Profiles of several companies that were founded to good in the world. Green companies as price leaders. How to get a copy of my $9.95 ebook, Painless Green: 111 Tips to Help the Environment, Lower Your Carbon Footprint, Cut Your Budget, and Improve Your Quality of Life—With No Negative Impact on Your Lifestyle at no cost.

 

Bill Newman: http://whmp.com/podcasts/the-101-best-dingers-in-baseball/ (segment starts at 28:28): A quick, intense 11-minute trip through the highlights of my work

 


Ask those Branding Guys: http://santafe.com/thevoice/podcasts/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world (segment starts at 9:23)

 

 

Todd Schinck, Intrepid Now, with a nice emphasis on the power of ordinary people to change the world: http://intrepidnow.com/authors/shel-horowitz-combining-principles-profits-grow-business-heal-world/ (segment starts at 2:28)

 

JV Crum, Conscious Millionaire, second interview: We cover my first activist moment at age 3, how I helped save a mountain, the next big environmental issue, and how a simple vow in my 20s changed my life http://consciousmillionaire.com/shelhorowitz2/ (segment starts at 3:25)

 

Jill Buck, Go Green Radio: http://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/92012/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world (segment starts at 0:52). The difference between socially responsible and socially transformative businesses, impact of a social agenda on employees, urban farming, new energy technologies…and a cool case study of how a dog groomer could green up.

 

Kristie Notto, Be Legendary: The perfect example of a business that addresses social issues, the hidden revenue model I showed a social entrepreneur, how a famous gourmet food company went head-to-head with a much larger competitor, what we can learn about engineering from nature, and why wars are solvable http://traffic.libsyn.com/belegendarypodcast/Be_Legendary_Podcast_-_Shel_Horowitz_for_itunes.mp3

 

Guest on Leon Jay, Socialpreneurtv http://socialpreneur.tv/building-better-products/guerilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world (you’ll get to see what I look like when I’m overdue for a haircut/beard trim—a rare glimpse at Shaggy Shel)

 

Two-part interview on Steve Sapowksy’s excellent EcoWarrior Radio podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/pt.-1-guerrilla-marketing/id1080237490?i=363550688&mt=2/ (Listen to Part 1 before Part 2, of course)

 

The first of two excellent shows on Conscious Millionaire http://consciousmillionaire.com/shelhorowitz/
Connect with Shel


 

Find on Facebook

 

 

 

 

 

About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of ten books…international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.
He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).
“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

The Clean and Green Club, July 2016

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
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Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, July 2016
This Month’s Tip: Event Planning and Marketing Lessons from a Wedding, Part 1
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A year and a half in the making, my daughter’s glorious wedding to the man she’s been living with for six years took place on June 9. Of course, my wife and I were thrilled, and we’ve adored Alana’s husband Bobby since we first met him—in Spain, where they were both exchange students and not yet a couple, in 2009.

And as a marketer who’s been advocating special events as marketing tools since 1984, I also saw many lessons I could draw from this 18-month planning experience, and share with you. I hadn’t planed an event on this scale since my own wedding in 1983, and I hadn’t started writing about marketing back then.

The lessons fall into three categories, so this is the first of three articles:
• Logistics and operations—What we did right
• Logistics and operations—What we could have done better
• Marketing/addressing audience needs

Part 1: Logistics and operations—What we did right
Know What You Want in a Venue
Alana and Bobby needed a place that could accommodate a good crowd; they invited about 200 people. As it turned out, there were only about 90 guests, and more options would have been open had we known it was going to be that small (we eliminated several because they maxed out at 100 or 130). But if 150 had attended and the place could only accommodate 100, it would have been a BIG problem.

They also wanted a country feeling, beautiful with great scenery, but not Rolls-Royce elegant. Home-like rather than hotel-like, and preferably close enough to either the happy couple (who live just outside NYC) or my wife and me here in Western Massachusetts so site visits would not be a huge burden, but that wasn’t a have-to. They absolutely required the ability to bring in an outside caterer (the bride is gluten/rice-free and vegetarian) and to serve alcohol. And of course, it had to be within our budget.

Research the Choices and Narrow them Down
Alana scoped out venues from Pennsylvania to Maine, went to their websites, and looked at their Yelp and TripAdvisor reviews. We also broadened the net by asking for suggestions from friends online and offline. Fairly early in this process, they decided that the wedding would definitely be in Western Massachusetts, within an hour or so of our house. This had many advantages logistically and cost-wise (venues and caterers here are far cheaper than the NYC area or even country settings two hours out of New York). As an example, we were able to store many wedding items in Alana’s old bedroom and bring them up in multiple carloads over a couple of days.

Once they made the decision to get married in our area, we started by visiting the top three choices (on a cold winter weekend in January, 2015, with a few inches of snow on the ground). They rejected one because it was too run-down, and another both because it was too remote and because the site owner was clearly going to be challenging to deal with. Fortunately, the third venue seemed to be perfect, and the site owner was welcoming and easy to deal with. With a Jewish bride and a Texan groom, it was a good omen to be greeted by a permanent sign that said “Shalom, Y’all—and by warm cups of tea, cookies, and an offer to move our snowy boots from the unheated mudroom to a spot where they’d be nice and toasty when we put them back on.

It was a charming and unusual private home with many homey touches and mountain views, set on a few hundred acres with several outbuildings and room to accommodate several overnight guests and many campers, about 40 minutes drive from us. It had a beautiful meadow a short walk from the main house that would be perfect for the ceremony, and another meadow right by the house where we could set up a tent for the reception.

Notice the Weak Points
In choosing this venue, we knew that parking was going to be an issue, and that any caterer would have to supplement the meager kitchen (a single four-burner stove and very limited counter space). So we talked to caterers who could bring in a portable kitchen for outdoor events, and we arranged to rent a shuttle bus to solve the parking problem.

But there were several other site issues that we found out later, so we only get a half score on this (see next month’s article).

Order your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Find out more and order from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies directly from me). http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
Download a free sampler with several excerpts, the complete Table of Contents and Index, and all the endorsements – blue link just under the second paragraph
Hear and Meet Shel
INTERVIEW ON BUSINESS BUILDING ROCKSTARS WITH NICOLE HOLLAND, Friday, August 19, midnight ET, 9 p.m. PT: http://bbrshow.com/podcast/068/
Another Recommended BookThe Local Economy Solution
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The Local Economy Solution: How Innovative, Self-Financing “Pollinator” Enterprises Can Grow Jobs and Prosperity, by Michael H. Shuman (Chelsea Green, 2015)

Michael Shuman says we go about economic development all wrong. The author of books like The Small-Mart Revolution and Local Dollars, Local Sense says most of our economic development energy goes to recruit mega-companies to locate a new facility, costs tens of thousands up to millions per job, and doesn’t make any sense.

These big companies, he says, are inappropriate development partners for several reasons:

  • They reach deep into taxpayers’ pockets for big subsidies
  • They have zero loyalty and will pick up and move again when some other community makes a better offer
  • They are often set up to actually destabilize successful, job-creating local businesses, who have to compete without subsidies against these heavily subsidized ventures
  • Typically, they don’t create very many new jobs for the amount of money they take from the government
  • Many of the jobs they do create are highly specialized and are filled by established employees moving to the area, rather than the locals who need jobs
  • Much of the money they make is exported back to the headquarters community and not spent locally.

Shuman recommends instead a policy of working with existing small businesses to provide the resources they need in several areas—five Ps of Planning, Purchasing, People, Partnerships, and Purse—in ways that require little or no government support, can become self-sustaining rapidly, and bring in new jobs for a tiny fraction of the costs incurred by the typical economic development department. The Purse chapter is particularly interesting, because most books on the green economy don’t really talk about how to fund it, and Shuman has lots of ideas about how.

The book is full of wonderful examples of this kind of assistance bringing powerful results—often because one person took the initiative and developed a new model. Just a few among many:

  • A San Francisco neighborhood issues a debit card that can be used at local businesses within the neighborhood (p. 90)
  • A local-biz loyalty program in Portland, Oregon allows businesses who in different sectors and different neighborhoods to co-market to their common customers (p. 99)—resulting in such collaborations as a profitable venture between a toy store and a coffee shop
  • A food delivery project in Vancouver, British Columbia was able to serve three times as many customers (far more efficiently and profitably) by systemizing its route delivery stops (p. 151)
  • Also in Vancouver, a community credit union was able to bring triple bottom line thinking into such projects as finding uses for food waste and a living-wage campaign—while growing to 500,000 members and $18 bn in assets (pp. 170-172)
  • Oberlin College, in Oberlin, Ohio, expanded from building an extremely green science center to creating an integrated economic development for its host community, featuring a “green arts district” with a LEED-platinum hotel and conference center, a culinary school serving an inner-city population from nearby Cleveland, and more (pp. 200-204)

There are dozens more great examples within Shuman’s book. But even more important than the examples is the consistent empowered thinking: we can do this, we should do it, it works better, and it can be self-supporting.

Moving municipal money management is an easy way to get traction on a true self-help economic development agenda. He points out that when the city of Tucson, Arizona committed $5 m to banking locally, only one of the three community banks even responded. But that local bank was able to turn that into $36 m in new funding for local businesses—creating enough jobs that the city doubled its deposit (p. 199). Traditional economic development can’t do this.

But visionary thinking can. Schuman quotes David Orr, the professor spearheading the Oberlin initiative: “Seek out those opportunities where 2 + 2 equals 22, not just 4.”

Connect with Shel


 

Find on Facebook

 

 

 

 

 

About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of ten books…international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.
He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).
“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

Recent Interviews & Guest Articles:

 

Five-minute interview on Jennings Wire: “How Ordinary People Can Do The Extraordinary” How ordinary people start and lead movements—and how Shel saved a mountain in his own town. http://www.jenningswire.com/authors/podcast-how-ordinary-people-can-do-the-extraordinary/

 

Mike Schwager: http://wsradio.com/051916-guerrilla-marketing-heal-world-shel-horowitz/
How I got started in social/environmental change at age 3 and returned to it (for life) at age 12. Dialog with Jack Nadel, 92-year-old entrepreneur with a green product line. The easiest ways a business can go green—and the real 7-figure savings that are possible when counting all the costs. Why market share doesn’t matter, and how to partner with competitors

 

Western Massachusetts Business Show with Ira Bryck, http://whmp.com/podcasts/western-mass-business-show-4-9-16/ Profiles of several companies that were founded to good in the world. Green companies as price leaders. How to get a copy of my $9.95 ebook, Painless Green: 111 Tips to Help the Environment, Lower Your Carbon Footprint, Cut Your Budget, and Improve Your Quality of Life—With No Negative Impact on Your Lifestyle at no cost.

 

Bill Newman: http://whmp.com/podcasts/the-101-best-dingers-in-baseball/ (segment starts at 28:28): A quick, intense 11-minute trip through the highlights of my work

Ask those Branding Guys: http://santafe.com/thevoice/podcasts/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world (segment starts at 9:23)

 

 

Todd Schinck, Intrepid Now, with a nice emphasis on the power of ordinary people to change the world: http://intrepidnow.com/authors/shel-horowitz-combining-principles-profits-grow-business-heal-world/ (segment starts at 2:28)

 

JV Crum, Conscious Millionaire, second interview: We cover my first activist moment at age 3, how I helped save a mountain, the next big environmental issue, and how a simple vow in my 20s changed my life http://consciousmillionaire.com/shelhorowitz2/ (segment starts at 3:25)

 

Jill Buck, Go Green Radio: http://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/92012/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world (segment starts at 0:52). The difference between socially responsible and socially transformative businesses, impact of a social agenda on employees, urban farming, new energy technologies…and a cool case study of how a dog groomer could green up.

 

Kristie Notto, Be Legendary: The perfect example of a business that addresses social issues, the hidden revenue model I showed a social entrepreneur, how a famous gourmet food company went head-to-head with a much larger competitor, what we can learn about engineering from nature, and why wars are solvable http://traffic.libsyn.com/belegendarypodcast/Be_Legendary_Podcast_-_Shel_Horowitz_for_itunes.mp3

 

Guest on Leon Jay, Socialpreneurtv http://socialpreneur.tv/building-better-products/guerilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world (you’ll get to see what I look like when I’m overdue for a haircut/beard trim—a rare glimpse at Shaggy Shel)

 

Two-part interview on Steve Sapowksy’s excellent EcoWarrior Radio podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/pt.-1-guerrilla-marketing/id1080237490?i=363550688&mt=2/ (Listen to Part 1 before Part 2, of course)

 

The first of two excellent shows on Conscious Millionaire http://consciousmillionaire.com/shelhorowitz/

The Clean and Green Club, June 2016

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, June 2016
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This Month’s Tip: Human Energy: The Next Frontier?
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Cats seem to spend about 18 hours a day NOT doing—either sleeping or vegging out in a sunny spot with no more activity than a loud purr. We humans, on the other hand, have close to the opposite ratio. OK, so some of that time is sitting at a desk and not doing much with our bodies. But a lot of it uses kinetic energy: movement.

Of course, we’ve been using direct-capture of human energy for tens of thousands of years, at least as far back as the invention of hammers and canoes. But turning it into electricity and powering devices with it is only a few decades old, as far as I know.

Why has so little attention been paid to harnessing this movement source of energy? It’s not like the concept is new. I remember hearing about a few pioneers capturing human energy back in the 1970s. And eight years ago, The Mother Earth News ran this article: http://www.motherearthnews.com/renewable-energy/pedal-powered-generators-zmaz08onzgoe.aspx – here’s an excerpt:

David Butcher’s experience is a case in point. Every morning he goes out to his garage and pedals a stationary bike for at least a half hour. The effort he puts into his workout isn’t wasted on friction as it is in most fitness gyms. Every pedal stroke makes electricity that is sent down a cable to his office in the house to power several small electrical devices. Pedal power recharges his electric razor and his cell phone, runs a computer monitor, and periodically runs the compressor that tops off the air pressure in the tires of his vehicles. David also runs the bike generator directly to a water pump whenever necessary for aerating and filtering the small backyard fishpond.

David works out of his home office in San Jose, California, as the client services director for a Web agency, and he sits in front of a computer most of the day.

Windstream Power, another company mentioned in the article, brags that it’s been doing this since 1974! So we’ve been able to convert human output to electricity for 42 years now. Isn’t it time we had a mass movement to capture at least some of that wasted energy?

Other people are also converting treadmills to capture kinetic energy (see http://www.paddockenergy.com/bike.htm ).

My latest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/ , discusses several examples of bicycle power, among them the Copenhagen Wheel, a nonmotorized device that stores a bicyclist’s kinetic energy and releases it when that rider needs extra power (like going uphill)—and a bicycle-powered trash-hauling fleet that has successfully competed with trucks in my own area for many years.

And what better place to do it than fitness centers? Texas State University retrofitted 30 elliptical trainers to capture the electricity: http://www.txstate.edu/news/news_releases/news_archive/2009/12/Kilowatts120709.html , calling it “the largest human power plant in the world.”

That claim could well be challenged in India, where a two-month-old pilot project called FreeElectric, http://billionsinchange.com/news/billions-in-change-free-electric-india-pilot-may-2016-update , is bringing light and power to places that never had it:

Kids are able to do homework after the sun sets, freeing them to help their parents or play outside with their friends while it’s still light. Shop owners are able to continue conducting business through the evening as opposed to closing their doors at dusk. Classrooms are able to power laptops, tablets, and flat-screen televisions, connecting students and teachers to knowledge, people, information, and ideas from all over the world.

On a smaller (and much cheaper scale), a fitness center in my area started capturing kinetic energy with its exercise bikes several years ago. 

Order your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Find out more and order from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies directly from me). http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
Hear and Meet Shel

Ronald M. Allen interviews Shel on the Manage Change show, TODAY, June 15, 7 pm ET/4 pm PT http://www.blogtalkradio.com/managechange/2016/06/15/shel-horowitz–going-green-raises-your-companies-revenues

WEBINAR FOR INDEPENDENT PUBLISHERS OF NEW ENGLAND/ASSOCIATION FOR SPECIAL SALES, “Green Audiences, Green Titles, Green Printing NEW DATE Thursday, June 23, 6 p.m. ET/3 p.m. PT https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7842561726385736194 – this is a brand new program I’ve never done before, highly recommended for any publisher considering producing books for the green market and/or greening your production.

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About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of ten books…international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.
He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).
“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

INTERVIEW WITH WADE TAYLOR OF WS RADIO, Monday, June 27, 2 p.m. ET/11 a.m. PT, one-hour interview with four segments:
1. Consumers: how to make buying choices that better the world
2. Small business: how to be there when the customer is ready to make that intelligent choice of a better world
3. Big business: operational excellence: lowering costs and boosting revenues by building products, services, and partnerships that not only help the planet but actively turn hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war into peace, and catastrophic climate change into planetary balance (while creating new markets)
4. Nonprofit/academic: how to be a resource and partner to business on this journey while also advancing your own agenda 
INTERVIEW ON BUSINESS BUILDING ROCKSTARS WITH NICOLE HOLLAND, Friday, August 19, midnight ET, 9 p.m. PT: http://bbrshow.com/podcast/068/
Recent Interviews & Guest Articles:
 
Mike Schwager: http://wsradio.com/051916-guerrilla-marketing-heal-world-shel-horowitz/
How I got started in social/environmental change at age 3 and returned to it (for life) at age 12. Dialog with Jack Nadel, 92-year-old entrepreneur with a green product line. The easiest ways a business can go green—and the real 7-figure savings that are possible when counting all the costs. Why market share doesn’t matter, and how to partner with competitors
Western Massachusetts Business Show with Ira Bryck, http://whmp.com/podcasts/western-mass-business-show-4-9-16/ Profiles of several companies that were founded to good in the world. Green companies as price leaders. How to get a copy of my $9.95 ebook, Painless Green: 111 Tips to Help the Environment, Lower Your Carbon Footprint, Cut Your Budget, and Improve Your Quality of Life—With No Negative Impact on Your Lifestyle at no cost.
 
Bill Newman: http://whmp.com/podcasts/the-101-best-dingers-in-baseball/ (segment starts at 28:28): A quick, intense 11-minute trip through the highlights of my work

Ask those Branding Guys: http://santafe.com/thevoice/podcasts/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world (segment starts at 9:23)
 
 

Todd Schinck, Intrepid Now, with a nice emphasis on the power of ordinary people to change the world: http://intrepidnow.com/authors/shel-horowitz-combining-principles-profits-grow-business-heal-world/ (segment starts at 2:28)

JV Crum, Conscious Millionaire, second interview: We cover my first activist moment at age 3, how I helped save a mountain, the next big environmental issue, and how a simple vow in my 20s changed my life http://consciousmillionaire.com/shelhorowitz2/ (segment starts at 3:25)

Jill Buck, Go Green Radio: http://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/92012/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world (segment starts at 0:52). The difference between socially responsible and socially transformative businesses, impact of a social agenda on employees, urban farming, new energy technologies…and a cool case study of how a dog groomer could green up.

Kristie Notto, Be Legendary: The perfect example of a business that addresses social issues, the hidden revenue model I showed a social entrepreneur, how a famous gourmet food company went head-to-head with a much larger competitor, what we can learn about engineering from nature, and why wars are solvable http://traffic.libsyn.com/belegendarypodcast/Be_Legendary_Podcast_-_Shel_Horowitz_for_itunes.mp3

 Guest on Leon Jay, Socialpreneurtv http://socialpreneur.tv/building-better-products/guerilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world (you’ll get to see what I look like when I’m overdue for a haircut/beard trim—a rare glimpse at Shaggy Shel)
 
Two-part interview on Steve Sapowksy’s excellent EcoWarrior Radio podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/pt.-1-guerrilla-marketing/id1080237490?i=363550688&mt=2/ (Listen to Part 1 before Part 2, of course)

The first of two excellent shows on Conscious Millionaire http://consciousmillionaire.com/shelhorowitz/
Another Recommended BookCradle to Cradle
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Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things, by William McDonough and Michael Braungart (North Point Press, 2002)

Have you ever *really* thought about soap? William McDonough and Michael Braungart have. Asking questions like “what kind of soap does the river [where the soap ends up after use] want?” they think about such options as:


• Eliminating the water from liquid soaps and detergents, so that the actual soap ingredients can be transported much more easily, at lower cost, and with much reduced environmental impact
• Individual-use packets of powder, formulated for specific bioregions with different water conditions and common types of textiles and packaged in fully biodegradable materials
• Designing clothes that repel dirt, as a lotus leaf does
McDonough (an architect based in the US) and Braungart (an industrial chemist in Germany who headed Greenpeace’s chemistry section before founding the German Environmental Protection Encouragement Agency) think about a lot of things most of us never question about how the modern industrial era has been cobbled together; they oppose the kludgy, unholistic “systems” that have become the norm.They thought about paper, and designed their own book using a waterproof, tree-free paper made of plastic that can be reused or recycled indefinitely with no degradation. This may seem at first an odd choice for a book about incorporating deep environmental consciousness into design

but it makes more sense when you realize that paper recycling is a flawed process that consumes a great deal of energy and inputs large quantities of chemicals to transform used paper into something not-quite-as-good.Their special paper is an example of what they call a “technical nutrient”: something developed by humans rather than nature, but of great value if it can be reclaimed. Reclaiming/reuse is generally easy when a product is composed of only technical or only natural nutrients. Too often, however, we mix natural and technical nutrients into a product that’s very hard to separate out again into those components, and thus the future value of all of it is zero. McDonough and Braungart consider this almost criminal, and stress the importance of designing everything for easy disassembly and reuse. What makes it only “almost” criminal in their eyes is intent. Usually, nobody’s trying to make the world suffer; they just don’t know any better. However, once the consequences are known, they see continuing the behavior as criminally negligent (pp. 43-44). And we need to change this “strategy of tragedy” to a strategy of change.

One way to do this is to design backward from the goal, rather than forward from the clumsy present (something I’ve been advocating for several years, including in my TEDx talk, “Impossible is a Dare“: http://www.ted.com/tedx/events/11809 *(click on “event videos”).

Human factors are also important to the authors. They oppose lifeless, soul-less buildings even if they meet all the green building standards. They think of ecosystems, “eco-effectiveness” (p. 76), rather than efficiency. And with this mindset, even industry can be a great neighbor:

 

…Industry can be so safe, effective, enriching, and intelligent that it need not be fenced off from other human activity (This could stand the concept of zoning on its head; when manufacturing is no longer dangerous, commercial and residential sites can exist alongside factories, to their mutual benefit and delight.) (pp. 87-88)

For McDonough and Braungart—and for John Todd, whom I profile in my new book Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World—waste becomes food. Whatever waste is generated, some other process or product should be able to use it.

Some other questions they like to ask, especially when toxics are involved (pp. 37-38):

  • Why is it there?
  • Is it necessary?
  • What happens if it’s recycled? Burned? These questions encourage us to ask other, implied questions:
  • What impacts do the ingredient or process have on energy and water, the waste stream, and on the ability to reuse both the final product and the leftovers?
  • What are the alternatives to using this ingredient or process?

McDonough and Braungart ask us to focus on the positive changes we want. Remove words that limit our responsibilities and our hopes to making things less bad, like “avoid,” “minimize,” “sustain,” “limit,” and “halt” (p. 45). Instead, make them not only ecologically appropriate but also fun (p. 154). Remember that effluent is no longer a problem if the effluent is cleaner than the influent and can be used again; design everything for total reuse, with no quality loss (pp. 109-110). Even a car can clean the planet as it drives (p. 179). Imperialism, they say, is a response to loss of nutrients

so use the concept of “abundancenot limits, pollution, and waste” (p. 91) as an antidote to imperialism.

Seeing materials as nutrients opens up new models beyond the usual purchase-and-dispose. Why not a rent-a-solvent business (p. 112), or a building that’s designed like a tree (p. 138), for instance?

The authors are very much against one-size-fits-all, preferring instead unique solutions adopted to each place and conditions, with plenty of redundancy (p. 185). Nature does this all the time; that’s why there are 8000 different species of ants (p. 120).

In almost 900 words, I’ve only scratched the surface. Especially if you’re in any kind of design capacity, read this book. Even if you’re not, it will change how you think and open many doors.