Category Archive for Clean and Green Marketing Newsletter

The Clean and Green Club, June 2017

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Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, June 2017
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This Month’s Tip: Marketing Your Ideas Is 24/7
A famous copywriter known for his grumpy persona posted on Facebook his unhappiness with people who post pictures of their meals. He got an earful from foodies, of course.

But I responded as a marketer. I want people to experience more delicious meals made with local organic ingredients, and by the way, without meat. I’ve been vegetarian for 43 years and see vegetarianism—particularly when based in local, organic foods—as one of the easiest ways to slash your carbon footprint. I don’t preach about it, but I remind myself constantly of Buckminster Fuller’s quote, “You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.”

This was my comment on his Facebook post:

Here’s why I do it. A lot of my work as a marketer is to foster ideas that make the world better—like the idea that eating locally grown organic foods can be appetizing. I carry these ideas beyond my paid work and see a well-photographed plate with a tasty-sounding description as a part of my activism that uses my marketing skills. I’m selling the sizzle, so to speak. And interestingly enough, many of my food posts get high engagement. It’s not uncommon to get 20 or 30 likes and several comments from people far away wishing they could come share my food. It’s also a vicarious pleasure for many people, just like sharing travel pictures. And finally, since the caricature of social media is the boring “what I had for breakfast” tweet, I want to prove that it’s possible to talk about what you’re eating in an attractive, even seductive manner. But I find Facebook a much better platform that Twitter. Need more room than 140.

Why did I post this, really? Because I am always looking for ways to put my ideas in front of new audiences. On some level, I’m a marketer every waking moment. And I hope you are too.

Marketing can be fun. And we can all learn from each other.

Here are a few examples of my foodie Facebook posts. Let me “focus group” you: do you find these capture your interest? Do they make you want to explore new foods? Am I succeeding as a spokesperson for this idea? Please share on the Comments page and we can all learn from this.

I’ll start with one that contained eight pictures (including the three just below). Obviously, some of the text refers to pics of the garden harvest that I’m not including here.

 

Who could believe that all these frost-sensitive veggies (1st pic) were still in my garden on October 24? Even a tiny (but absolutely delicious) zucchini. It’s supposed to go down to 34°F tonight, so I harvested everything fragile. In the harvest pic, you can see some of the beans have speckled pods. Those pods were too tough to eat, but the beans inside were great (2nd pic). 3rd pic is probably the last near-100% from-our-garden dish of the year (except I cheated with a bit of organic local shallot grown three miles up the road). Beans in pods, beans removed from the tough pods, tomatoes harvested green last week and now finally ripe, and that itsy-bitsy green non-polka-dot zucchini (I’m dating myself, I know—who gets the reference?) Served it with (local organic) sweet potato and organic (nonlocal) lentil tacos and a green salad, shown here when it was all still from Next Barn or our garden. Later, I added olives and hazelnuts. And while I was waiting for Dina to come home, I sliced up and began drying our remaining supply of home-grown jalapeños, most of which actually got to ripen and turn red on the vine. The ones I picked today were green. #locavore

 

Another great #locavore dinner: frozen corn and zucchini with dried tomatoes, local cheddar cheese, and salsa; sweet potato, tot soi, shallots, garlic, and ginger in peanut sauce; spinach-arugula-carrot salad with goat gouda, local brie, sunflower seeds, local home-roasted squash seeds flavored with cayenne and salt, and local apple. All the veggies and fruits other than what was in the salsa were local and organic. The zucchini, tomatoes, butternut squash were from our own garden. Two of the three cheeses were local. The peanut butter was locally ground but not locally grown. I don’t think anyone does peanuts around here. But there is a farm that does local organic ginger, and we buy it exclusively.

New on the Blog
 
 
 
 
Hear and Meet Shel
Proud to be a speaker at Marc Guberti’s Content Marketing Success Summit, June 6-17. Other speakers include Ray Edwards, Ana Hoffman, and Jay Papasan. Take a look at the whole program at http://shelhorowitz.com/go/ContentMarketingSuccessSummit/ — or jump directly to the All-Access Pass s you can listen anytime from now to forever: http://shelhorowitz.com/go/ContentMarketingAllAccessPass/

The Web Bender, Jack Humphrey, and JV Queen Gina Gaudio-Graves
interview me on Leverage Masters Radio Tuesday, June 27, noon ET/ 9 a.m. PT. Listen by calling 646-478-0823, or listen live online at http://www.BlogTalkRadio.com/jvqueen , or later on replay at http://TheLeveragists.com

Order your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Find out more and order from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies directly from me). http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
 
Download a free sampler with several excerpts, the complete Table of Contents and Index, and all the endorsements.
Another Recommended BookPractical Bliss
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Practical Bliss: The Busy Person’s Guide to Happiness by Lisa Broesch-Weeks (InBliss, 2016)

Several times a year, an interviewer asks me, “what was the best decision you ever made?” I always answer, “the decision in my 20s to have a happy life.” That decision influenced everything else from that day forward. I believe it has been the key to my productivity, and the change I’ve made in the world.

Yes, it was a conscious decision. And yes, you can choose that path as well.

My client Lisa Broesch-Weeks can help you get there. She sent me a copy of her book, and as soon as I saw the title, I knew I’d like it. As a busy person, I love the idea of happiness for busy people, and I love the idea that bliss can be practical. She uses “bliss” and “happiness” pretty much interchangeably, seeing bliss as simply a more complete version of happiness (p. 96). I see more of a difference: bliss is more of a temporary high, while happiness, to me, is an ongoing state—but for this review, I’ll accept her near-merging of the terms.

Happy people. Lisa says, have figured out how to advance their purpose—which will be a verb, not a noun (pp. 44-48) and will be widely different for different people—with every part of their lives. And their purpose is not tied to serving one particular individual (p. 58).

They don’t beat themselves up striving for perfection; they’ve replaced stress-inducing words like “search” with power words like “explore” and “uncover” (p. 57). At work, they’re more productive and more engaged. Gallup put the cost of “employee disengagement” at $300 billion per year (p. 18), so there are dollar figures on that engagement. And at home, they enjoy better relationships, better health, and better brain function (pp. 21-24).

A lot of keeping happy is basic self-care: not letting yourself get overstressed…learning to say no to tasks that don’t advance your purpose or to people who deplete your energy…taking time for vacations, exercise, and other self-care (pp. 27-28) …and making space for your passions and pleasures. She reminds us that machines don’t run without time for recharging and maintenance, and neither do people (p. 26).

More stuff doesn’t create more bliss. And neither does running on the “hedonic hamster wheel” (p. 78—what an amazing metaphor!). And certainly you don’t get there by neglecting your passions in favor of something that feels “more important” but usually isn’t (p. 96). She points out that no one else is going to relieve you of your “optional obligations and stressors” and offers strategies to get rid of them in ways that don’t alienate others (p. 104).

Not all stress is avoidable, of course, and she provides help with managing the mandatory stress. As an example, she suggests worrying less about the need to appear constantly busy and more about how to add value (p. 111)—and shows some ways to shift focus from what’s wrong to what’s right, phrasing our goals and accomplishments in ways that the brain can hear and absorb, and act upon (pp. 119-126). Once concept I especially loved was the idea of gratitude for the wonderful future you expect, and not just for a present that may or may not seem fulfilling. She notes that this transformation helped her “put myself in situations where I would make it easier for success to find me” (p. 134). Time in gratitude, she says, is not an expense but an investment.

As the book wraps up, she advises on how to thrive despite happiness “haters” and how to forgive them (pp. 154-156). Though some of her advice may seem obvious, it can be hard to see from the outside, and always worth reminding ourselves: “I have what might be startling news. Living in bliss is a journey, much more than a destination…you may not know when you’ve arrived (p. 141, emphasis in original).

Note: Although I have done some consulting for Lisa, this review is not part of that arrangement and I am not being compensated for it.

Recent Interviews & Guest Articles: 

Shel’s done 22 podcasts recently, ranging from 5 minutes to a full hour. Click here to see descriptions and replay links.
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About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of ten books…international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel), his newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, has already won two awards and is endorsed by Jack Canfield and Seth Godin. Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Going Beyond Sustainability, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He’s an International Platform Association Certified Speaker and was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.
He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).
“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

Recent Interviews & Guest Articles

The debut of my brand new talk, How Social Entrepreneurs Can Thrive in a Trumpian World, was a webinar put on by Green America (my fourth for them). Catch the replay at https://youtu.be/GderLF6vn0s

Karina Crooks interviews me on the Business Code Podcast: http://businesscodetalk.com/podcast/shel-horowitz/ :

  • What mangrove trees can teach engineers
  • Why “coopetition” works
  • What will social entrepreneurship look like 20 years from now
  • How a seamstress and an electrician separately changed the world, three decades apart
  • How to create a successful mass movement

Brief but powerful interview on JenningsWire—a great lesson in how to make the most of less than nine minutes.

Ajay Prasad and I chat on Founder’s Corner. He mentors me about pricing, ROI, and other MBA-type business concerns, while I educate him on green business and the green/social entrepreneurship market—including three different types of customers for green products and services and the surprising answers to questions like 1) what’s the largest segment of customers for green products? And 2) what company sells more organic products than Whole Foods?

Positive Phil Podcast. We start with a detailed example of the types of products that can create social betterment (reducing poverty, creating jobs), environmental/health/safety improvement (eliminating toxic fumes and a major fire hazard), and make a nice profit all at once. Then several examples of how we can improve our engineering and design by studying nature. We discuss the word “Transformpreneur” (which I use to describe myself)…how solar can be workable for renters and for people who live in cloudy areas…how to replace boring press releases with fascinating ones…a company that has thrived by employing “unemployables”—and what I love about the work I do and the life I lead.

Listen to the Best Interview I’ve Ever Done

Kymm Nelsen, host of Conscious Leadership Weekly, conducts the best interview I’ve ever done. In just 51 minutes, we managed to cover:

  • My activist childhood beginning at age 3, including a 48-year boycott
  • The key mindset shift that I harnessed to build the movement that saved a mountain
  • Why problems like hunger, poverty war, and catastrophic climate change are actually solvable—and how to effectively motivate people to solve them
  • Three ways business can profit by solving those problems
  • How to avoid getting a stake pounded through the heart of your business after a customer service screw-up
  • How empowering your employees lowers your HR costs
  • Why lying about one thing can destroy all the hard-won goodwill you’ve built up in your business
  • The exciting new exponential-growth paradigm of “biological marketing”—and the engineering miracle of “biomimicry”
  • How to convince business people who think going green or running a conscious, social-change-focused business is “too hard”
  • A key mistake the green movement committed in the 1970s and 80s
  • The two simple changes I made that cut my paper use ~80 percent
  • The way one social enterprise addresses urban poverty, creates personal empowerment, and eliminates staffing shortages all at once
  • Why Ben & Jerry’s was able to carve out 40 percent market share in a market with hundreds of competitors
  • The surprising answer: what company sells more organic food than Whole Foods—and how you can use their marketing strategy to sell green and social change products to people who don’t even care about the issues
  • The almost net-zero-energy house built in the cold Colorado Rockies back in 1983—that doesn’t need a furnace, stays warm enough to grow bananas, and has a $5 monthly electric bill
  • How thinking about light bulbs differently could save some businesses up to $4 million
  • Finding and harnessing new product opportunities that never existed before: from a Frisbee-sized hydroelectric generator to small-space indoor apartment gardens

Brand with Jenna—Brave Entrepreneur Podcast: http://brandwithjena.com/090podcast/ (Episode 90):

  • How you can create a *profitable* business that can change the world
  • The teamwork involved in building a successful movement
  • Learning to think long-term—even through a 10-year campaign

Profits and Prana with Ysmay Walsh: https://www.ysmay.com/profits-and-prana/(S2E6):

  • Ordinary people joining with others to change the world
  • How we saved our local mountain
  • Why Ben & Jerry’s is so successful (hint: it has a lot to do with their corporate social conscience)
  • Exploring the idea of an international force of yoga teacher serving as conflict mediators

Smart Hustle Podcast with Ramon Ray: http://www.smarthustle.com/shel-horowitz-businesses-being-green/

  • Why every business can benefit by introducing and marketing products and services that address threats like hunger, poverty, war and climate change
  • Why social entrepreneurship goes deeper than philanthropy
  • How even solopreneurs can make a difference

Five-minute interview on Jennings Wire: “How Ordinary People Can Do The Extraordinary” How ordinary people start and lead movements—and how Shel saved a mountain in his own town. http://www.jenningswire.com/authors/podcast-how-ordinary-people-can-do-the-extraordinary/

Mike Schwager: http://wsradio.com/051916-guerrilla-marketing-heal-world-shel-horowitz/
How I got started in social/environmental change at age 3 and returned to it (for life) at age 12. Dialog with Jack Nadel, 92-year-old entrepreneur with a green product line. The easiest ways a business can go green—and the real 7-figure savings that are possible when counting all the costs. Why market share doesn’t matter, and how to partner with competitors

Western Massachusetts Business Show with Ira Bryck, http://whmp.com/podcasts/western-mass-business-show-4-9-16/ Profiles of several companies that were founded to good in the world. Green companies as price leaders. How to get a copy of my $9.95 ebook, Painless Green: 111 Tips to Help the Environment, Lower Your Carbon Footprint, Cut Your Budget, and Improve Your Quality of Life—With No Negative Impact on Your Lifestyle at no cost.

Bill Newman: http://whmp.com/podcasts/the-101-best-dingers-in-baseball/ (segment starts at 28:28): A quick, intense 11-minute trip through the highlights of my work

Ask those Branding Guys: http://santafe.com/thevoice/podcasts/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world (segment starts at 9:23)

Barry Moltz: http://barrymoltz.com/2016/05/375-jay-baer-says-hug-haters-green-movement-continues-federal-contracting-opportunities-small-business/ (segment starts at 15:12)

Todd Schinck, Intrepid Now, with a nice emphasis on the power of ordinary people to change the world: http://intrepidnow.com/authors/shel-horowitz-combining-principles-profits-grow-business-heal-world/ (segment starts at 2:28)

JV Crum, Conscious Millionaire, second interview: We cover my first activist moment at age 3, how I helped save a mountain, the next big environmental issue, and how a simple vow in my 20s changed my life http://consciousmillionaire.com/shelhorowitz2/ (segment starts at 3:25)

Jill Buck, Go Green Radio: http://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/92012/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world (segment starts at 0:52). The difference between socially responsible and socially transformative businesses, impact of a social agenda on employees, urban farming, new energy technologies…and a cool case study of how a dog groomer could green up.

Kristie Notto, Be Legendary: The perfect example of a business that addresses social issues, the hidden revenue model I showed a social entrepreneur, how a famous gourmet food company went head-to-head with a much larger competitor, what we can learn about engineering from nature, and why wars are solvable http://traffic.libsyn.com/belegendarypodcast/Be_Legendary_Podcast_-_Shel_Horowitz_for_itunes.mp3

Guest on Leon Jay, Socialpreneurtv http://socialpreneur.tv/building-better-products/guerilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world (you’ll get to see what I look like when I’m overdue for a haircut/beard trim—a rare glimpse at Shaggy Shel)

Two-part interview on Steve Sapowksy’s excellent EcoWarrior Radio podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/pt.-1-guerrilla-marketing/id1080237490?i=363550688&mt=2/ (Listen to Part 1 before Part 2, of course)

The first of two excellent shows on Conscious Millionaire http://consciousmillionaire.com/shelhorowitz/

The Clean and Green Club, May 2017

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
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Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, May 2017
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This Month’s Tip: Why I Threw Away This Letter

The fund appeal above is from a group I’ve supported often in the past. It’s a group that does great work. But I got only as far as the salutation before I knew it was going straight into the recycle bin. I stopped to scan it so I could share it with you, and then off it went into the mighty blue bin.

Why? Because I’ve made a pledge not to respond to manipulative marketing, and I consider this manipulative. If you’ve been reading this newsletter, you know I’ve been calling for honesty in marketing for many years. And whenever someone markets to me in a way I don’t consider honest, my wallet stays securely in my pocket.

I would not have objected to a salutation of Dear Dina (my wife’s first name). But when a mass mailing uses a font that looks like handwriting to cross out Dear Friend and change it to Dina, I feel insulted. Clearly, this is an attempt to make this think a human being has been involved in the change.

I’ve received fund letters from local charities where the generic salutation was replaced with our names—but those are typically done by hand and signed by someone we actually know. And yes, I give those letters more careful consideration, and usually give something. In other words, this technique works when done correctly. There’s nothing manipulative about that. A real person has gone through the list, selected people in his or her circle, and personalized those letters.

But doing this on an entire mass mailing, using a handwriting font—that’s deception, pure and simple. We do not know the president of this organization. We’ve supported this group in the past, but I don’t like being tricked into making a contribution. So instead of giving some bucks, I’m sharing this with you.

In case you’re wondering, I checked the envelope. The stamp was presorted first class, an in-between option that’s cheaper than regular first class but more expensive than bulk mail, and requires the same sort of pre-processing that third-class bulk mail does. You can’t easily hand-edit a letter in a presort mailing. In other words, the odds are 99 to 1 that it was not hand-corrected.

NOTE: If you’re wondering why I’m sharing a letter dated last November, it’s because that’s when I wrote this article. I often work several months ahead with the main articles and sometimes the book reviews. This didn’t feel so time-sensitive but I needed to bump it up.
New on the Blog
What Role Can Nonstrategic Mass Movements Play in Social Change? http://greenandprofitable.com/what-role-can-nonstrategic-mass-movements-play-in-social-change/

Why “Popularity Contest” Surveys are Useless http://greenandprofitable.com/why-popularity-contest-surveys-are-useless/

40 Years Ago Today, We Changed the World (five part series beginning http://greenandprofitable.com/40-years-ago-today-we-changed-the-world-part-1/ and linking from each installment to the next

What I Told the DT Administration: Business Case for Paris Accord http://greenandprofitable.com/what-i-told-the-dt-administration-business-case-for-paris-accord/
Hear and Meet Shel
The debut of my brand new talk, How Social Entrepreneurs Can Thrive in a Trumpian World, was a webinar put on by Green America last month (my fourth for them). Catch the replay at https://youtu.be/GderLF6vn0s

Karina Crooks interviews me on the Business Code Podcast: http://businesscodetalk.com/podcast/shel-horowitz/ :

  • What mangrove trees can teach engineers
  • Why “coopetition” works
  • What will social entrepreneurship look like 20 years from now
  • How a seamstress and an electrician separately changed the world, three decades apart
  • How to create a successful mass movement

I missed Book Expo America last year after attending every one since 1997. But it’s back in NYC and my daughter is NOT getting married the following week (as she did in 2016), so I will be attending (May 30-June 2). Contact me if you’d like to meet for coffee.

Proud to be a speaker at Marc Guberti’s Content Marketing Success Summit, June 6-17. Other speakers include Ray Edwards, Ana Hoffman, and Jay Papasan. Take a look at the whole program at http://shelhorowitz.com/go/ContentMarketingSuccessSummit/ — or jump directly to the All-Access Pass s you can listen anytime from now to forever: http://shelhorowitz.com/go/ContentMarketingAllAccessPass/

The Web Bender, Jack Humphrey, and JV Queen Gina Gaudio-Graves
interview me on Leverage Masters Radio Tuesday, June 27, noon ET/ 9 a.m. PT. Listen by calling 646-478-0823, or listen live online at http://www.BlogTalkRadio.com/jvqueen , or later on replay at http://TheLeveragists.com

Order your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Find out more and order from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies directly from me). http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
 
Download a free sampler with several excerpts, the complete Table of Contents and Index, and all the endorsements.
Another Recommended BookFrom Dictatorship to Democracy
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From Dictatorship to Democracy: A Conceptual Framework for Liberation by Gene Sharp (The New Press, 2012)

Social change—eliminating such evils as hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change—has been at the core of my work for more than four decades. Long before I started wrestling with the idea of harnessing the business community to achieve these big goals through profitable products and services back in the early 2000s, I devoted significant volunteer time to making a better world.

And now that the government of my own country, the United States, is taking significant steps backward, I will occasionally step out beyond the business world and find inspiration and information from completely different channels.

This month’s book review is one of those. Gene Sharp is the preeminent applied nonviolence theorist in the US today. I first discovered his work in the early 1980s and read all the way through his very dense, three-part Politics of Nonviolent Action back then, after hearing him speak.

So I was excited to find a much shorter and more readable distillation of his work that I feel comfortable recommending here. It’s only 138 pages, but it may shift your thinking about how to not just achieve social change but actually overthrow dictators. In fact, Sharp has been cited as an influence by nonviolent warriors around the world, including the Arab Spring movement and the struggle against apartheid in South Africa, among others.

While some agents of change see them as points on a continuum, Sharp makes a clear distinction between nonviolent and violent struggles:

  • Strategic nonviolent methods—which use not just visible protests but many tactics involving withdrawal of cooperation from the regime—tend to work better and faster: “Withdrawal of support is…the major required action to disintegrate a dictatorship.”
  • They create sympathy among the populace, while violent struggles create alienation and anger toward the agents of change
  • They play to the strengths of the protestors, while violent tactics play to the government’s strength (since the government is always better armed and usually better trained in fighting)
  • They create decentralized movements and alternative governance structures that spread leadership skills much more widely—and this becomes key when planning for and setting up the replacement government
  • They generate a peace based on freedom and justice, and not on repression

Sharp has a strong preference for deeply strategic campaigns, and notes that while tactics might shift during repression, the overall strategy should be carefully nurtured; the repression is designed to get the movement to abandon its successful strategies, and thus is a sign of victory (pp. 90-91). And if the populace is willing to endure repression, repression or the threat of it will not longer be enough to prop up the dictatorship (pp. 106-107).

He suggests starting with small, low-risk campaigns that lead to relatively easy victories, celebrating them and then expanding the demands. And he provides some excellent strategy checklists, such as seven positive characteristics of successful nonviolent political defiance (p. 44) and eight factors to consider when preparing to take power (pp. 84-86). He even looks at how to win over the military in ways that don’t foster a coup d’état (pp. 100-101), and how to defeat a coup if one happens (pp. 117-118).

And he notes the importance of being prepared in the event of either rapid or slow-moving victory (p. 111)—something I learned the hard way when Save the Mountain, a movement I’d started—achieved its goals very quickly and had no second stream of activity to take up the energy; our organization, which could have played a role in many other campaigns, simply withered away. Expanding out to the level of ending a repressive government, if the activists are not prepared to create a government, someone else will step into the vacuum, with potentially disastrous consequences for freedom.

Successful nonviolent regime change will be more permanent and well accepted if it takes seriously the charge of protecting the rights of its citizens, including its minorities. Sharp points out (p. 122) that following the victory, the citizens are now well-schooled in how to bring down governments, will be resilient and resistant against future attempts to grab power at the expense of citizens, and willing to struggle together to achieve a free and just society.

The book concludes with a list of 198 nonviolent tactics grouped into six broad categories:

  1. Economic noncooperation: boycotts (6 subcategories)
  2. Nonviolent protest and persuasion (10 sub-categories)
  3. Social noncooperation (3 subcategories)
  4. Economic noncooperation: boycotts (6 subcategories)
  5. Political noncooperation: strikes (7 subcategories)
  6. Nonviolent intervention (5 subcategories)

Even if your current organizing has much more modest goals than regime change, this book will give you a solid grounding in theory and many practical tools. Highly recommended.

Listen to the Best Interview I’ve Ever Done
Kymm Nelsen of the Conscious Leadership Podcast managed to pull more from me than anyone else has ever done. In 51 minutes, we covered so much that I list 17 separate points on my interviews page —and that was not a complete list. It’s one of three shows I’ve added to that page. Visit the page to scan the list and note what to listen for—and of course to click over and read it.

And watch this space for links to interviews by Internet marketer Willie Crawford, PR queen Annie Jennings’ Elite Wire, Lisa Faulkner of Game Changers, Ali Salman of Escape the 9 to 5 Grind, and Karina Cooke of the Business Code Podcast.

Recent Interviews & Guest Articles: 

Shel’s done 20 podcasts recently, ranging from 5 minutes to a full hour. Click here to see descriptions and replay links.
Connect with Shel

 

 

Find on Facebook

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of ten books…international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel), his newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, has already won two awards and is endorsed by Jack Canfield and Seth Godin. Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Going Beyond Sustainability, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He’s an International Platform Association Certified Speaker and was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.

He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).

“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

The Clean and Green Club, April 2017

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
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Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, April 2017
Like Twitter Pinterest GooglePlus LinkedIn Forward
Listen to the Best Interview I’ve Ever Done
Kymm Nelsen of the Conscious Leadership Podcast managed to pull more from me than anyone else has ever done. In 51 minutes, we covered so much that I list 17 separate points on my interviews page —and that was not a complete list. It’s one of three shows I’ve added to that page. Visit the page to scan the list and note what to listen for—and of course to click over and read it.And watch this space for links to interviews by Internet marketer Willie Crawford, PR queen Annie Jennings’ Elite Wire, Lisa Faulkner of Game Changers, Ali Salman of Escape the 9 to 5 Grind, and Karina Cooke of the Business Code Podcast.
This Month’s Tip: Right and Wrong Ways to Respond to Breaking Climate Change News
Here are two press releases from two different NGOs responding to the same major news event (and the graphic that one of them included). I’m giving you the headline and first paragraph, and a link in each headline to read the whole thing—and then I’ll dissect them for you. Neither of these is a client and I had nothing to do with writing them—so this is purely about the lessons we can draw.

Example #1:

BSR’s Statement on the U.S. Administration Executive Order on Climate Change

BSR regrets today’s executive order from U.S. President Donald Trump to dismantle the Clean Power Plan, a set of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) policies that are intended to reduce the United States’ greenhouse gas emissions by 32 percent from 2005 levels and cut carbon pollution from the power sector by 30 percent by 2030. In combination with the administration’s dramatic cuts to climate programs at the EPA and U.S. State Department, this announcement undermines policies that have stimulated economic growth, consumer savings, job creation, infrastructure investment, private-sector competitiveness, and public health.

Example #2:

Trump Administration Climate Action Rollback Decision Is Misguided and Economically Damaging

The Trump administration’s efforts to dismantle the U.S. Climate Action Plan, including withdrawing support for the Environmental Protection Agency’s Clean Power Plan, “is completely misguided and ignores the irreversible clean energy economy that is already underway, creating good-paying jobs and economic vitality in communities across the country,” Ceres President Mindy Lubber said in a statement today. Lubber served as the EPA Administrator for the New England Region in 2000.

What about each release did you find effective or ineffective?

Ask yourself just two questions: which worked better for you, and why? Then scroll down to see what I felt worked well and poorly about each.

If you’d like me to include your results in a summary (you won’t be identified), please drop me a note with your answers.

Shel’s Analysis:

While the BSR release did a better job understanding the need for rich content, with numerous links and a picture, the copy was pathetically weak. This press release:

  1. Used a wimpy headline that doesn’t take a position
  2. Chose a stock photo that doesn’t add anything to the reader’s understanding—why not a photo of demonstrators thanking a company for providing clean energy and good jobs?
  3. Made a terrible verb choice in “regrets”—which makes it sound like an accident that was BSR’s faults—rather than a much more appropriate verb, like “condemns”
  4. Buried the real story in the second paragraph, which has hard-hitting facts to make a clear case against the Executive Order:

Just 18 months ago, the U.S. federal government estimated the net economic benefits of the CPP at US$26-45 billion, with consumers set to save US$155 billion from 2020 to 2030. In addition, the CPP provides regulatory support to the clean energy economy, which, according to the U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy and Employment Report, supported more than 3 million U.S. jobs in 2016. The public health benefits are also significant. Research suggests the Clean Power Plan could prevent 3,600 premature deaths and more than 300,000 missed work and school days by cutting pollutants that contribute to soot and smog. – See more at: http://3blmedia.com/News/BSRs-Statement-US-Administration-Executive-Order-Climate-Change#sthash.qUNCeiiF.dpuf ”

I would have used a headline like “BSR: Trump’s Short-sighted Reversal of US Climate Change Leadership Could Cost Consumers $45 Billion and Kill 3600?—and then moved right into a bulleted list of the facts. I also would break up BSR’s long paragraphs.

This very long press release has enormous amounts of juicy content, but you’d never know it from the headline and lead. Even further down, it notes that companies investing in carbon mitigation are seeing 27% return on investment, 29% revenue increases, and 26% reduction in carbon emissions. Isn’t that a lot more newsworthy than “BSR regrets…”?

The Ceres release, while also flawed, is much better. It starts with a headline expressing a strong point of view (although we don’t know who is stating this point of view), moves into a sound bite, and finishes the first paragraph with a significant and highly relevant credential.

So what are the flaws in the Ceres document?

  1. The release itself is pretty much all rhetoric, without the facts to back it up. BSR had the facts, but didn’t call attention to them.
  2. There’s no link to Lubber’s complete statement (and only two links in the whole release).
  3. The important point about losing competitive advantage to China is all the way down at the bottom of the release.
  4. No graphics at all.
CORRECTION: MADELEINE L’ENGLE
The correct link for my interview with Madeleine L’Engle, author of A Wrinkle in Time, is http://frugalfun.com/l’engle.html . Sorry about last month’s typo.
New on the Blog
Environment/Travel:
How Thailand Looks at Environmental Issues

Politics:
If You Kick the Press Out, It’s Not a Press Conference!
Can We Get This Movie Into Every History and Social Studies Class?
This is What DICTATORSHIP Looks Like

Business and Marketing:
How I Reinvented a 36-Year-Old Business
Why Did Pepsi Get Attacked As “Tone-Deaf” On This Ad?

Social Justice:
With an Abundance Mentality, We Can Solve Hunger, Poverty, War & Climate Change
The Secret of the Fulcrum Principle

Hear and Meet Shel
How Social Entrepreneurs Can Thrive in a Trumpian World: webinar put on by Green America (my fourth for them), Thursday, April 20, 1 pm ET/10 am PT. This conference line has only 26 seats but it should be available for unlimited replay if the recording comes out (last time, the recording failed 🙁 ).  http://info.greenbusinessnetwork.org/acton/form/3919/004f

I missed Book Expo America last year after attending every one since 1997. But it’s back in NYC and my daughter is NOT getting married the following week (as she did in 2016), so I expect to be attending (May 30-June 2). If there’s interest, perhaps we can organize a gathering.

Proud to be a speaker at Marc Guberti’s Content Marketing Success Summit, June 6-17. Other speakers include Ray Edwards, Ana Hoffman, and Jay Papasan. Details next month.

The Web Bender, Jack Humphrey, and JV Queen Gina Gaudio-Graves
interview me on Leverage Masters Radio Tuesday, June 27, noon ET/ 9 a.m. PT. Listen by calling 646-478-0823, or listen live online at http://www.BlogTalkRadio.com/jvqueen (or later on replay at http://TheLeveragists.com )

Friends Who Want to Help

Order your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Find out more and order from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies directly from me). http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
 
Download a free sampler with several excerpts, the complete Table of Contents and Index, and all the endorsements.
Another Recommended BookThe Best of Us
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The Best of Us: People, Profit, and the Remaking of Modern Leadership by Cleve Stevens, Ph.D. (Beaufort Books, 2012)

If you’ve ever explored the world of “prosperity consciousness,” or seen the movie, “The Secret,” you’ve probably encountered the Law of Attraction (LOA). This is the idea that we can use our thoughts, feelings, and especially our mindsets to shape the reality we want to experience—and its corollary: if our lives are a mess, our attitude probably bears some responsibility; shift our attitude and we get better results.

While I’m not an LOA groupie, I do find merit in the concept. In my 20s (long before I encountered any LOA teachings), I made a conscious choice to have a happy life, and I noticed the effects very quickly. As an example, within a year of that decision, I had to waste a whole day of precious vacation to mail packages of crafts we’d purchased back to my house from Mexico. The old me would have fretted and fumed and wasted the whole rest of our vacation being angry at the lost day. But the new, happier me focused on “what a great story I’ll have to tell my grandchildren!” I wouldn’t even have my first child for another three years, so this strikes me now as quite remarkable.

And in my 50s, just a few years ago—with guidance from prosperity teacher Marilyn Jenett, who I’ve mentioned a few times in the “Friends Who Want to Help” section of this newsletter—I used LOA principles to visualize a recalcitrant tenant finding a great place to live and moving out voluntarily, which was a necessary step before we could sell that house. I have no proof of cause-and-effect, but I do know that after about six weeks of complaining that she would never find a comparable place for anywhere near the low rent we had charged, she found a place and happily vacated, and the sale went through.

What does all this have to do with a book on corporate leadership? This: Without ever using the phrase “Law of Attraction” or the acronym “LOA,” Stevens has written a dynamic exploration of using LOA not to gain personal wealth but to be a world-class leader (and he sees material wealth as flowing easily to those who exercise this kind of leadership).

Key to his view is taking complete personal responsibility for everything that happens to or through you, even for things over which you have no control. He recognizes that the lack of control starts with what kinds of families we’re born into and continues throughout life, but still makes a compelling case for acting as if you were in charge of your own life, even when outside factors chart the overall course. And doing this opens doors to great achievements, and ultimately to personal greatness. Stevens offers multiple roadmaps and exercises, including five acts (pp. 227-228) and nine traits (pp. 305-314) of transformation.

Mindset is a vital part of Stevens’ approach. Reminiscent of Yoda telling us “Do. Or do not. There is no try,” Stevens asks us to expand our horizons and get out of our own way. One of the most fascinating pieces is his distinction between options (narrow choices imposed by others) and possibilities (limitless, self-chosen, driven by intention that creates its own fulfillment mechanism).

I took eight pages of notes on this book. Obviously, there’s a lot I could share but I don’t want to saddle you with a 5000-word review. So here are ten more among my takeaways, among the several dozen:

  1. Transformative leadership loves profit—not as the end goal but as a byproduct of something higher: “capitalism cubed” (p. xxii)
  2. “Reasonable” and “reform” don’t get us to “transformative”; we have to be bold—and when we do, we run circles around the old-style transactional-leadership organizations (pp. 20, 330)
  3. Hatred can never create lasting good; it has to emerge from a positive vision of the possible (pp. 50-51)
  4. We play the victim because we lack faith in our ability to achieve our objectives—but we can learn to change these belief patterns by dong the right things with sufficient intensity and consistency (pp. 99, 102, 132, 134, 135)
  5. Intention is about internal power, not willfulness, which is an external force (pp. 165-166)
  6. Courage is not fearless; it’s about facing the fear until we can emerge from our self-made masks, not about powering through the fear as if it didn’t exist—fearlessness is a form of stupidity (pp. 202-205, 218)
  7. Loving, authentic criticism rooted in genuine desire to help the other person improve is usually well-received; phony disguised personal attacks are not—harness “radical honesty” but never use truth as a weapon (pp. 216-217, 292)
  8. Don’t be paralyzed by fear of failure or a need to conform in order to be liked (pp. 263-264)
  9. Few things are more empowering than “standing strong and tall for someone else” (p. 325)
  10. When moving an organization forward, first get agreement on the WHAT; there’s time later on to figure out the HOW, especially since the transformational process typically takes 12 to 36 months (pp. 334, 345).
Recent Interviews & Guest Articles: 

Shel’s done 20 podcasts recently, ranging from 5 minutes to a full hour. Click here to see descriptions and replay links.
Connect with Shel

 

 

Find on Facebook

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of ten books…international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel), his newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, has already won two awards and is endorsed by Jack Canfield and Seth Godin. Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Going Beyond Sustainability, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He’s an International Platform Association Certified Speaker and was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.
He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).
“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

The Clean and Green Club, March 2017

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
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Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, March 2017
Like Twitter Pinterest GooglePlus LinkedIn Forward
Listen to the Best Interview I’ve Ever Done
Kymm Nelsen of the Conscious Leadership Podcast managed to pull more from me than anyone else has ever done. In 51 minutes, we covered so much that I list 17 separate points on my interviews page —and that was not a complete list. It’s one of three shows I’ve added to that page. Visit the page to scan the list and note what to listen for—and of course to click over and read it.

And watch this space for links to interviews by Internet marketer Willie Crawford, PR queen Annie Jennings’ Elite Wire, Lisa Faulkner of Game Changers, Ali Salman of Escape the 9 to 5 Grind, and Karina Cooke of the Business Code Podcast.

This Month’s Tip: How to Tell Good Advice from Bad Advice

My grandfather used to read all seven of NYC’s daily newspapers (most of which have since gone out of business) in order to triangulate a picture of what was *really* going on.

  • Listen to multiple sources. If you hear the same thing over and over from sources with divergent viewpoints, there’s probably merit in it—but do some due diligence and verify (at least take a quick trip to Snopes.com).
  • Do your own research. Read some books and articles but recognize that the situation may not be comparable.
  • Post specific questions *with as much detail as you can* on discussion lists–but recognize that the advice you get will be a mix of useful and useless. Study the groups before posting questions so you get a sense of whose answers are worthwhile. The more carefully and completely you phrase your question, the better your answers. And learn how to parse it.
  • Listen to your gut. You can even develop the skill of asking your subconscious directly and listening to the answer (which may emerge as a movement of the body).
  • Don’t be afraid to go out of the box, if it seems to be the right move–even if others are telling you it’s too risky. But make sure it really is the right move.

Finally, be prepared when good advice takes you in a different direction, and understand when that makes sense. I’ll tell you a success and a failure.

Back in 2003 as I was preparing my sixth book for publication (my 10th, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, came out in April), I asked a discussion list about subtitles that would go well with my main title, Win-Win Marketing. This was a list where I’d been active for quite a few years, and I had a pretty good sense of the “players.” I heard very strongly from some of the most respected people on the list that my main title was a problem (for reasons I still don’t really relate to)—that the phrase “win-win” had enormous negative baggage for some people.

It took two months of brainstorming to come up with a title: Principled Profit: Marketing that Puts People First. Oddly enough, knowing none of this history, the Mexican publisher (which had originally called it Marketing Based in the People) changed the title on their second print run to Marketing Based in Win-Win (Mercadotechnia basada en ganar-ganar).

Fast-forward to last fall. Someone I’ve known for many years and respect enormously got very excited about the way I am combining a Board of Advisors, Mastermind group and online discussion into a single entity for my new “Transformpreneurial Brain Trust.” She gave me a long and well-thought-out brainstorm about how to commission brand new software that would do everything I wanted. The only problem was that she lost sight of my wider goal, which is to work with the business community on profitable ways to turn hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war into peace, and catastrophic climate change into planetary balance. I realized instantly that this would distract me from my real work and cost me much time and many thousands of dollars. Even though the advice came from a trusted source, it was bad advice for me at that moment. I chose to run with an off-the-shelf platform and to stay focused on my real mission.

New on the Blog
Environment/Travel:

Hear and Meet Shel
Ethical Corporation’s Responsible Business Summit, NYC, March 27-28. I will be moderating a keynote/fireside chat by Franz Paasche of Paypal and a panel with execs from Pirelli, Actiam, and Coca-Cola, both on Monday. I’ll also be attending Tuesday, without any moderation duties. I believe you can still save $200 with the code MP200, when you register at http://events.ethicalcorp.com/rbs-usa/register.php

How Social Entrepreneurs Can Thrive in the New Political Climate: webinar put on by Green America (my fourth for them), Thursday, April 29, 1 pm ET/10 am PT.

I missed Book Expo America last year after attending every one since 1997. But it’s back in NYC and my daughter is NOT getting married the following week (as she did in 2016), so I expect to be attending (May 30-June 2). If there’s interest, perhaps we can organize a gathering.

Note: I still have openings on my calendar for live or virtual events around Earth Day (a week on either side of April 22). Drop me a line or call 413-586-2388 if you have a need (or want to earn a commission by finding me a paying gig).

Order your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Find out more and order from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies directly from me). http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
 
Download a free sampler with several excerpts, the complete Table of Contents and Index, and all the endorsements.
Another Recommended BookA Wrinkle in Time
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A Wrinkle In Time by Madeline L’Engle

When I usually review books about sustainable business, customer skills, marketing and the like, why am I recommending a classic children’s fantasy novel from the 1950s?

Here are some of the reasons:

  1. This book has amazingly useful things to say about resistance to totalitarianism, nonconformity, the role of science, and defying expectations—all of which seem particularly relevant on the world stage right now.
  2. It’s a fun read that might take you only an hour or two, involving a 12-year-old girl and her companions on a classic Joseph Campbell-style Hero’s Journey to rescue her father and save the universe, visiting several planets along the way.
  3. The discussion of tesseracts—folding space in on itself to shorten interstellar travel from millennia to minutes—should spark some excellent creative thinking on themes like: 1) nothing is impossible, 2) we can solve the biggest problems we can imagine; 3) collaboration makes all the difference.
  4. I discovered Wrinkle at age 9 and credit it with helping me survive a very difficult time in the first half of my second decade. I gained enormous strength from it and have read it at least a dozen times.
  5. You might know a kid—or a grownup—who really needs this message right now.
  6. Last but not least, I read a whole business book this month that I decided wasn’t appropriate for the review column and the next one I started is large and I’m nowhere near done with it.
  7. I think it might be fun to mix in an appropriate novel every once in a while. The column has only covered nonfiction since I started it in 2003, but so many novels have changed the world. Arts, including literature, have an important role to play in creating our ideal world, and I should honor that once in a while.

I welcome your feedback on this. Oh, and if my review intrigues you, I interviewed Madeline L’Engle for two hours, back in the early 1990s, on the difference between truth and fact (she has since passed on).

Recent Interviews & Guest Articles: 

Shel’s done 19 podcasts recently, ranging from 5 minutes to a full hour. Click here to see descriptions and replay links.
Connect with Shel

 

 

Find on Facebook

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of ten books…international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel), his newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, has already won two awards and is endorsed by Jack Canfield and Seth Godin. Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Going Beyond Sustainability, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He’s an International Platform Association Certified Speaker and was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.
He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).
“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

The Clean and Green Club, February 2017

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
Like Twitter Pinterest GooglePlus LinkedIn Forward
Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, February 2017
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This Month’s Tip: Cautions in Setting Up a Social Entrepreneurship Venture

An entrepreneur asked on a discussion list for “best ideas to apply entrepreneurial skills to social enterprise” for a social entrepreneurship bootcamp in Taiwan. Since I’ve spent the last two months showing you how to move forward with social entrepreneurship, I thought you’d benefit to see some of the caution flags, too. Here’s the relevant part of my response:

The earlier a company can build in holistic thinking, the better. I see way too many would-be social entrepreneurs go off half-baked on a poorly conceived project that can actually make the situation worse on the ground. For example, many people jump into the famous Buy One Give One model without thinking through the effect on the pre-existing local economy in the target developing area. It has to be done in ways that don’t undermine the struggling local entrepreneurs. Others create something very dependent on continued input from the developed-nation partner but don’t create the structures to make sure that input IS in fact continued.

I see it as a strength that you want to include marketing, and that your vision of marketing includes storytelling. Social entrepreneurship companies are uniquely positioned to benefit by telling the right story to the right people. I do think some of the pieces you’ve identified may want to wait until the organizations are more established, and that the format should be interactive and not pure lecture.

You may find it helpful to view the ways I bring this material to an audience, by viewing my TEDx talk, http://www.ted.com/tedx/events/11809 (click “event videos”) or my 4-minute demo reel, which is footage from this year and somewhat more evolved: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tooSVbHQ5Ik You would definitely benefit from my 10th book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World—and you can download a sampler at no cost at http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world

If your situation is similar to this entrepreneur’s, here are some other cautions to consider:

  • Will it be economically viable? Without profit or a funding source, all the good in the world will be undercut by the need to close before completion, leaving people frustrated and enraged as the progress they’d made disappeared.
  • Can your project be developed without enormous expenditures of resources, time, and money?
  • Do you have buy-in from locals on the ground that will partner with you?
  • Will the project sustain itself using local managers once you’ve moved on?

There are many more questions you should ask yourself. This list will get you started, and then keep asking questions like “and then what happens?” or even the marketer’s question, “so what?”

Again, I’m happy to help you think this through. It’s one of the things I do as a consultant to social change and environmental businesses.

New on the Blog
Just because I haven’t shared with you some of my recent blog posts in months doesn’t mean I’m not blogging regularly. I’ve put up 23 new posts since October 1, or about six new ones per month as of early February. Several I’m particularly proud of (not in chronological order)—note that one post is in more than one category:

Changing the World through Business
The Most Important Question to Create Eco-Friendly Technological Leaps

New Uses for CO2? Elkington’s Latest Out-Front Thinking

$10 Million to Charity—Another Cheer for Patagonia!

When Does Social Change Work Become a “Calling”?

Marketing/Customer Service
Will Budweiser’s Gamble Pay Off? (analysis of the company’s immigration-themed Superbowl ad)

Why I’ve Boycotted My Neighborhood Theater Since 1969

A committed author is always looking for book promotion opportunities

And THIS is Why Trump Won!

The Election and its Aftermath
George Lakey: DT’s Repression is a Huge Opportunity for the Movement (if you pick just one article on the blog, make it this one)

I DID Give Him a Chance…And That’s Why I March

And THIS is Why Trump Won!

10 Reasons to Resist Nonviolently, Chanukah, And Barbara Kingsolver’s Message

Friends Who Want to Help
JV Crum III, who has twice featured me on his Conscious Millionaire Podcast, turned a recent diagnosis of diabetes into a way to help others. Not only has he cut his blood sugar in half in just two weeks (and without insulin treatments), but he’s changed the focus of his series to “From Diabetes to Healthy and Thriving Entrepreneur.

If you’ve been around the independent publishing community for any length of time, you probably know the name Deltina Hay. Here’s her latest project: Elearning Delta is a full-service elearning solutions company, specializing in innovative course development and custom learning management systems. The Elearning Delta team can produce your elearning project from the ground up, providing full production services all the way through your ecommerce solution. (http://elearningdelta.com)

Hear and Meet Shel
I’ll be one of the featured experts on the Monetise Your Passion Summit with Rita Joyan, February 13-March 5. That’s not a typo; she’s Australian. In fact, she was named Canberra’s Young Business Woman of The Year for 2015. Canberra, you might know, is Australia’s capital. And I’m especially excited because the other experts are not the same old same old. I’ll be learning for the first time from people like:
  • Stephanie Leigh Mulac – how to build 6-7 figure businesses
  • David Essel –  known as The new leader of the positive thinking movement.
  • Jesse Brisendine – founder of the 1 year 1000  challenge
  • Ally Laporte – radio personality and parenting expert  – her radio program has 6 million listeners.

I have several other interviews scheduled but don’t yet have their air dates:

  • With Internet marketer Willie Crawford
  • On the Positive Phil podcast “interviewing entrepreneurs and positive people” (I’m both)
  • With Kymm Nelsen on the Conscious Business Weekly podcast
  • With Alyssa Wright on the Leading Change podcast
  • Business Code Podcast with Karina Crooks
  • Game Changers with Lisa Faulkner

And shortlisted/in negotiation with meeting planners at several other events, but none are definite yet. Possibilities include Chicago and Rapid City, South Dakota, among others.

I’ll be moderating two panels at Ethical Corporation’s 5th Responsible Business Summit NY taking place on March 27-28 2017 at the Brooklyn Marriott Hotel.

The Summit offers three focused tracks all shaped to uncover the REAL potential for CSR to drive profit, accelerate growth and change culture. Over 200 major-corporation delegates will attend to hear 45+ senior level speakers. And I’ve arranged to save you $200 on the conference fee. Just use the code, MP200, when you register at http://events.ethicalcorp.com/rbs-usa/register.php

How Social Entrepreneurs Can Thrive in the New Political Climate: webinar put on by Green America (my fourth for them), Thursday, April 29, 1 pm ET/10 am PT.

I missed Book Expo America last year after attending every one since 1997. But it’s back in NYC and my daughter is NOT getting married the following week (as she did in 2016), so I expect to be attending (May 30-June 2). If there’s interest, perhaps we can organize a gathering.

Order your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Find out more and order from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies directly from me). http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
 
Download a free sampler with several excerpts, the complete Table of Contents and Index, and all the endorsements.
Another Recommended BookPeople Shock
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People Shock: The Path to Profits When Customers Rule by Tema Frank

It’s been a really long time since I’ve reviewed a customer service book in this space. While I love writing about deep sustainability, occasionally I will revisit the basics and review a book on customer service, marketing, or general leadership. As a marketer, I see customer service and leadership as part of marketing. Get customer service wrong, and it doesn’t matter how brilliant your ads and messaging on, how clever your company colors—you’re toast.

This is a nicely written book by someone who was a corporate insider and moved into independent consulting for companies in desperate need of better customer service. And as we all know, a whole lot of companies could benefit from some coaching and consulting on that end.

Frank builds her book around a simple formula:

Promise + People + Process = Profit

She breaks this down, with at least one chapter on each of the 3 Ps on the left side of the equals sign.The promise is what the brand is really about: what your company stands for, its higher purpose.

People, of course, refers to the human factor: treat your workers well, make them feel like valued players, give them enough responsibility to take initiative and make customers happy. And in turn, they will be loyal, productive, and creative, willing to help you achieve greatness by making your customers feel great.

But even the best team will not be able to help you if you fail on process. Staff can be super-friendly and helpful, but if the system just doesn’t work, you’ll still take a hit on the bottom line.

Meanwhile, the companies that do customer service well, like Nordstrom and (in her view) Amazon, are raising the bar. At the same time, and social media provides a forum to massively amplify consumer complaints; she cites the infamous “United Breaks Guitars” video (which I also cite in my own latest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World)—and points out that United failed to learn from that debacle.

Some of her other many good points:

  • Customer-focused companies outperformed the S&P 500 by 5 times (p. 29)
  • Examine your “defector pipeline” to find ways to stop the loss (p. 62)
  • Only break your brand promise if you’re willing to break your brand (p. 67)
  • A bad apology can make things worse; a good, sincere apology—backed up with proper action—can turn a disgruntled customer into a fan (pp. 67-72); base apologies in “humility, transparency, and a desire to learn” (pp. 285-286)
  • Act on employee ideas immediately when feasible (p. 119)
  • Remember your existing customers, who are too-often neglected even though they’re more profitable than new business (I’ve written about this as well)(p. 148)
  • Make sure your frontline staff can access ALL the information about problems and solutions (p. 159)—and welcome their input on better ways to address various issues; even think about honoring your employees in “mistake of the week” meetings (p. 204)
  • Understand that fans of yours who recommend you are likely to also recommend your competitors—giving you the opportunity to earn even more referrals as you discover why they recommend others and can earn their trust in those areas (p. 274)

She also has great examples of companies that reinvented one or more of these Ps, with particularly wonderful examples around management. I especially loved learning about Ricardo Semler, head of the Brazilian company Semco, which eliminated practically every aspect of traditional hierarchical management and has grown 40 percent per year.

There’s lots more. If you have a customer service staff, you’ll pick up some great tips from this book.

Recent Interviews & Guest Articles: 

Shel’s done 16 podcasts recently, ranging from 5 minutes to a full hour. Click here to see descriptions and replay links.
Connect with Shel

 

 

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About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of ten books…international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel), his newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, has already won two awards and is endorsed by Jack Canfield and Seth Godin. Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Going Beyond Sustainability, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He’s an International Platform Association Certified Speaker and was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.
He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).
“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

The Clean and Green Club, January 2017

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Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, January 2017
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Happy 2017. May we all come together for a better world. I worry greatly about the future of my country: the US. I recognize that this newsletter goes to people who may have very different politics than mine. I offer these first five paragraphs in a spirit of dialog. Even if you don’t agree with me, as a businessperson who cares enough about social responsibility to be on my list, you need to have a sense of what’s going on in your logical market. But if you really don’t want to know this, skip down to this month’s tip.

But I take hope in knowing that the power of social movements is stronger than the power of governments. We will continue to work for the environment, for social justice, for better conditions for all, and for a climate where bullying, misogyny, and racism are no longer acceptable—and I hope you join me.

Thus, my wife and I will be marching in the streets of Washington, DC on January 21, holding the new president’s feet to the metaphorical fire on Inauguration Weekend.

Similar rallies are being held in several major US cities. The Facebook page is https://www.facebook.com/events/2169332969958991/ and you can find one near you at https://www.womensmarch.com/sisters . Although they’re calling it a women’s march, they’ve made it very clear that men are welcome.

One easy specific action you can do if you agree is to Like the Facebook page 3NoTrump. Each week, my wife, daughter, and son-in-law provide three easy but meaningful actions you can do to not stand idly by: phone calls to make with the phone number and a sample script, copy-and-paste emails, that sort of thing. Already, we’ve been able to celebrate victory on a couple of the projects they’ve posted.

This Month’s Tip: How to Choose the Right Social Responsibility Path for Your Particular Business
The best types of CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) activities do all this:

  1. Dovetail closely with your company’s skills, capabilities, interests, and goals
  2. Make a measurable difference in global problems, e.g., turn hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war into peace, and/or catastrophic climate change into planetary balance—ideally, look for strategies that create multiple wins and address multiple goals
  3. Launch profitable products and services
  4. Open possibilities for new marketing initiatives

Helping companies figure this out is part of what I do. If you visit http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/d-i-y-do-it-yourself-resources/ , the first two links are self-assessments—one for social responsibility and one for green practices. Filling either or both out entitles you to 15 minutes of my time, via Skype or similar.

And here’s a real-world example, an excerpt from one of many case studies in my latest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World. To me, this is a “perfect storm of positivity” with wins all around: for the company, the purchaser, the dealer, the community, the environment, and the economy. The references to Polak, Warwick, and Prahalad are all explained earlier in that section.

Let There Be Light

d.light—one of the companies Polak and Warwick mention—simultaneously addresses poverty, education, air pollution/toxic fumes/health risks, energy savings, carbon footprint, and more—and makes a huge difference in lives of those at the bottom of the economic pyramid. All with a simple three-item product line.

Headquartered in San Francisco with additional offices in China, India, and Kenya, d.light sells inexpensive freestanding bright-light LED lanterns with lifetime batteries powered by dual solar/plug-in electric chargers. The company’s mission statement: “to create new freedoms for customers without access to reliable power so they can enjoy a brighter future.”

And to accomplish this mission, the company employs a deeply holistic analysis of the problems faced by people at the bottom of the heap, and how a reliable and renewable source of good light can help solve them.

The lights go into two types of environments: places where light has been supplied by kerosene (or, conceivably, open fires)—and those with no pre-existing night-time light source.

If the lantern replaces an existing kerosene model, it accomplishes many desirable goals: It provides a better quality of light that needs no fuel, does not produce toxic fumes, has no risk of setting the house on fire, reduces pollution, and leaves considerably more money in the hands of the family using the lantern—because the savings over purchasing kerosene typically pay for the lantern in about two months.

Where the lantern provides light in a previously unlit area, the benefits are different, but just as significant: four more hours per day of productive time. Children can advance much further with their studies; cottage industries, farms, and microbusinesses can produce and sell more. In short, the lamp becomes a ladder out of poverty.

Using classic Prahalad-inspired design principles, the units are cheap, extremely durable, and designed for multiple environments. A company video shows the lamps dropped from a high balcony and run over by a car, and still working afterward. At least one of the three models can be mounted on a wall or ceiling. The top-line model can also charge mobile phones. In developing countries, payment plans can be arranged for less than the previous monthly cost of kerosene; in developed countries, 10 percent of the proceeds funds lamps for children who could not buy them. Worldwide, they’re sold with a two-year free-replacement warranty.

Operating 6000 retail outlets in 40 countries, d.light is very successful, both financially and in the social and environmental good it has created. As of February 28, 2013, the company claims:

  • 13,638,438 “lives empowered”
  • 3,409,610 school-aged children reached with solar lighting
  • $275,817,462 saved in energy-related expenses
  • 3,589,490,280 productive hours created for working and studying
  • 656,952 tons of CO2 offset
  • 10,115,224 kWh generated from renewable energy

Build This Kind of Success Into Your Own Business

So how can you build this kind of profitable social change focus into your own business? Start by filling out one or both of those assessments at http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/d-i-y-do-it-yourself-resources/ , and get on the phone with me for 15 minutes at no charge. Wouldn’t you just love to start 2017 with a new focus on profitable social entrepreneurship?

Friends Who Want to Help
Over the past three years, I’ve worked closely with a remarkable business coach who has helped me wrap myself around the idea of thinking so big as to turn hunger and poverty into sufficiency, war into peace, and catastrophic climate change into planetary balance.

As I do once in a while, I’m sharing a note from her. Just because working with her has been transformational for me and might be for you. I am not compensated for any referrals to her. Doing this just to help her—and you.

“I work as a business and life coach and a Certified Hypnotherapist. Working on your goals and letting go of the thoughts and feelings no longer helpful to you assists you to move forward in your life and work and create wellbeing for yourself and for others. You can do these separately or combine them together. To see how they can assist you to go forward, call Oshana Himot, MBA, CHT, at 602-463-6797 or email oshanaben at yahoo.com ”

Hear and Meet Shel
I’ll be one of the featured experts on the Monetise Your Passion Summit with Rita Joyan, February 13-March 5. That’s not a typo; she’s Australian. In fact, she was named Canberra’s Young Business Woman of The Year for 2015. Canberra, you might know, is Australia’s capital. And I’m especially excited because the other experts are not the same old same old. I’ll be learning for the first time from people like:
  • Stephanie Leigh Mulac – how to build 6-7 figure businesses
  • David Essel –  known as The new leader of the positive thinking movement.
  • Jesse Brisendine – founder of the 1 year 1000 challenge
  • Ally Laporte – radio personality and parenting expert  – her radio program has 6 million listeners.

Look for a solo mailing about this with the full details around February 5, once I have them to share with you.

Also look for these upcoming podcasts (details when I have them):

  • With Internet marketer Willie Crawford
  • On the Positive Phil podcast “interviewing entrepreneurs and positive people” (I’m both)
  • With Kymm Nelsen on the Conscious Business Weekly podcast
  • With Alyssa Wright on the Leading Change podcast

I also expect to be moderating at least one panel at Ethical Corporation’s Responsible Business Summit in New York, March 27-28: http://events.ethicalcorp.com/rbs-usa/conference-agenda.php

And shortlisted/in negotiation with meeting planners at several other events, but none are definite yet. Possibilities include Chicago and Rapid City, South Dakota, among others.

I missed Book Expo America last year after attending every one since 1997. But it’s back in NYC and my daughter is NOT getting married the following week (as she did in 2016), so I expect to be attending (May 30-June 2). If there’s interest, perhaps we can organize a gathering.

Order your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Find out more and order from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies directly from me). http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
 
Download a free sampler with several excerpts, the complete Table of Contents and Index, and all the endorsements.
Another Recommended BookBorn on Third Base

Born on Third Base by Chuck Collins (Chelsea Green, 2016)

One-percenter Chuck Collins, an heir to the Oscar Meyer fortune who went to prep school with Mitt Romney, has written a dramatic and well-penned book on why wealthy people will benefit from getting out of their isolation bubble and getting down and dirty in social change organizing. It’s a great read, and a very provocative one—and it includes reader-friendly features including a resources list, detailed notes, and a thorough index (yay!). His primary audience is the wealthy themselves, with a secondary audience among organizers who would like to enlist one-percenters to work in and/or fund their efforts.

And he walks his talk. He gave away his own fortune, and he’s been community organizing on class and climate issues for more than 30 years.

Collins says many of the one percent are actually disadvantaged by their wealth. It binds them to a set of conventions and isolates them from meaningful community in the wider world. When he had a fire, the neighbors from the trailer park he’d organized came over with casseroles and offers of help. When he needs access to a tool, he can often borrow it. He notes that this kind of gift economy is additive, not zero-sum. Generosity creates more generosity; there are no losers if it’s done with balance and good intention.

But the wealthy, isolated in mansions within “gated communities and gated hearts,” don’t often experience those resilient and vibrant relationships. When they can buy whatever they want, they don’t bother to tap into those community resources. When the civic infrastructure fails them, they have the luxury to opt out and take advantage of for-profit private-sector alternatives—while the poor have to either suffer or agitate for change. Collins suggests instead that the wealthy stay and fight, “be the squeaky wheel,” and get results for the entire community. As an example, he organized to improve conditions at the local municipal swimming pool, rather than fleeing with his family to a private country club. He suggests forming “resilience circles” that build deep community while addressing neighborhood (and global) issues—and urges wealthy allies to tell their stories.

Wealthy people also have the resources to address systemic change through the economic system. As his late colleague Felice Yeskel said, they can work at “the intersection of personal change and system rewiring.” Collins is heavily involved in the climate movement, and he quotes a study showing that superior attention to climate risk correlates well with superior financial metrics. Thus, wealthy investors can choose to invest in conscious businesses. And the socially responsible investment sector is growing exponentially.

The one percent, he notes, is not a monolith. He divides the sector into five “neighborhoods”: substrata of class, ranging from “Affluentville,” with incomes in the $680,000 to $3 million range, on up to “Billionaireville,” a rarified enclave of just 540 households at the very top.

Many of those in the lower strata of the upper class are reachable, he says. Once they see the disconnect between their lives and the lives of others, once they understand the benefits that accrue by replacing purchasing power with real community, once they realize that when others climb out of poverty, it is not an attack on them—they will join and stay involved as long as they’re treated as human beings with something valuable to offer, and not just as either a human ATM machine or a target for class anger. He quotes social change theorist Gar Alperovitz: “You learn by engagement, not by hanging back.

And it’s in those risk-taking leaps that we find the excitement, the meaning of life.”

After more than 40 years of organizing and marketing for social and environmental change, a lot of his points were familiar to me. But one that wasn’t was his shocking chapter on charitable giving. Apparently, many family foundations are basically a way to scam out of paying taxes and do very little genuine charitable work. And this is part of how 22 percent of wealth now devolves to the one percent (most of it to the top 1/10 of 1 percent), more than doubling the 9 percent figure of 1978.

Collins is not anti-capitalist. But he distinguishes generative (healthy) capitalism from degenerative (unhealthy) manifestations. He shows numerous examples of how the wealth can make a difference day to day, and how wealthy people can grapple with their own issues around wealth. The book ends very powerfully, with his story of going back to his childhood community of Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, and discovering that he still had friends there whom he could turn into allies—he didn’t have to be alienated from others in the one percent just because he was working full-tine on social change and had given away his fortune.

And on the very last page, he shares an amazing metaphor: “Our job is to serve as hospice workers for the old world, the old story…and midwives to the new world, the new story.”

Disclosure: Chuck Collins and I lived in the same social change community in 1980-81. I didn’t know him well, but we traveled in the same circles.

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Recent Interviews & Guest Articles: 

Shel’s done 16 podcasts recently, ranging from 5 minutes to a full hour. Click here to see descriptions and replay links.
Connect with Shel


 

Find on Facebook

 

 

 

 

 

About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of ten books…international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.
He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).
“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

The Clean and Green Club, December 2016

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
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Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, December 2016
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Making the Business Case on Climate Change to Trump
Last month, I mentioned that I wrote to Trump and made a business case for continuing to honor Paris. You can read my open letter on GreenBiz.com, https:/www.greenbiz.com/article/making-business-case-climate-change-trump . Interestingly, I read recently that Leonardo DiCaprio had given Trump and his daughter copies of his video on climate change, which I believe makes a similar case.
This Month’s Tip: 10 Reasons to Build Social Responsibility into Your Business

When I’m interviewed, I find that most reporters and radio hosts have this idea that creating a socially response business is onerous. They think it adds costs, complexities and headaches—and many of them wonder why anyone would go through the “bother.”

Well, they got one part right. It does add a layer of complexity. But if you do it right, social entrepreneurship creates so many benefits! Consider a few of them:

  1. You generate consumer loyalty; customers feel good about supporting socially/environmentally responsible businesses, and are even willing to pay higher prices.
  2. Customers become allies in both product development and problem resolution.
  3. You create deep loyalty among your employees; they’re happy to go to work each day, and they brag about working at your firm. This improves productivity and employee retention. And that employee loyalty reduces training and onboarding costs; it even creates a pipeline to find new employees among your current employees’ friends and family.
  4. Customers, employees, suppliers, and distributors do some of your marketing for you.
  5. You’ll have an easier time raising capital. Your options will expand beyond traditional investors and banks to crowdsourcing. Consider entrepreneurial platforms like Kickstarter, GoFundMe, IndieGoGo, and Barnraiser—as well as sites dedicated to social change and environmental crowdfunding, such as https://startsomegood.com/ or https://www.ioby.org/ . You can also attract corporate sponsors and even grants.
  6. It’ll be much easier to find joint venture partnerships that leverage more than one organization’s skills for the benefit of all.
  7. As you start to go public about your social response efforts, you’ll be asked to share best practices as a speaker and/or writer (which have lots of benefits of their own).
  8. Media will be happy to tell your story—and you don’t have to pay to get that exposure.
  9. If you do screw up, you’ll have more latitude while you make it right.
  10. You lower both the risk and the weight of negative consequences from boycotts to lawsuits.

Isn’t all that worth some extra complexity?

Next month: How to Choose the Right Social Responsibility Path for Your Particular Business. And meanwhile, wishing you a very happy holiday season, whatever holiday you celebrate.

Hear and Meet Shel
Master marketer Willie Crawford interviews Shel Thursday, January 26 (rescheduled from December 1). And he will take questions live on the air. Watch next month’s newsletter for listening instructions.

Monday and Tuesday, March 28-29, I think I will be attending the Ethical Corporation conference in New York City, and moderating at least one session. Details not firmed up as of press time.

Order your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Find out more and order from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies directly from me). http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
 
Download a free sampler with several excerpts, the complete Table of Contents and Index, and all the endorsements.
Another Recommended BookPower and Love
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Power and Love: A Theory and Practice of Social Change by Adam Kahane (Berrett-Koehler, 2010)

I’ve been working for social and environmental change since 1969. That’s even longer than my time in marketing, which started in 1972. Back then, what I was marketing was my views on social issues, especially the Vietnam War.

During my early times of active organizing, I would have found this book incredible helpful. Much later, without knowing it, I used Kahane’s model in the most successful organizing I’ve ever been involved with: Save the Mountain, in my own town of Hadley, Massachusetts, US.

Kahane traces the evolution of his thinking through his direct involvement in all sorts of global struggles, from rebuilding South Africa after the end of apartheid to looking for peaceful solutions to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict to helping Guatemala and Colombia emerge from totalitarianism. Serious struggles, in other words. And he acknowledges that he did many things wrong before he discovered his key insight:

Power and love are the yin and yang of organizing. Neither one is        effective without its “opposite.” Either one by itself will        eventually evolve from a generative, positive focus at the start to        a degenerative, socially hostile outcome—but together, they help        us achieve great things.

You can look at this through an Eastern Taoist lens, as I did just now. But you can also frame it as a Germanic Hegelian or Marxian dialectic: power and love are the thesis and antithesis; their synthesis is positive social change. A third lens is one I learned studying comedy improv about ten years ago: replace either-or with both-and.

Whichever lens you look through, the combination of power and love is very effective. They balance each other, keep each other in check, and maintain a generative focus. And we need this kind of holistic approach to move forward.

Martin Luther King defined power as the ability to achieve a purpose (p. 12). Unchecked by love, power-to (positive, change-oriented) devolves into power-over (oppressive, protective of inequality). Paul Tillich notes (p. 46) that power-to destroys oppressive institutions, but power-over destroys people—sometimes in ways that are hard to see. Kahane says that his own wife, a South African and veteran of the struggle there, would rather deal with overt than covert racism (p. 48). But when love comes in to bring power into balance, you can achieve power-with, and real unity (p. 138). And that’s when things start to move forward.

Love can morph in similar ways. Validation of another can crumble into a stifling forced unity/false consensus (p. 49, p. 65, p. 92) or a state of mind that feels good but can’t change anything. But combining awareness of power relationships leads to a multipartisan (NOT bipartisan) approach (p. 118) that recognizes the need to collaborate with opponents—and you don’t have to like them in order to love them (p. 31).

Kahane suggests inquiring specifically about the power and love in any situation, and poses ten questions to determine who brings what into the mix (p. 73).

Although I took four pages of notes, I’m keeping this review short and deliberately omitting many of Kahane’s key points. Why? Because if you’re doing social change, or running a social change business, you will get far more out of Kahane’s ideas and experiences by spending a few hours with the book, and I want you to be able to apply the many powerful lessons I haven’t even touched upon.

But here’s a really good offer for you: I actually typed out my notes (something I almost never do) and if you read the book, I’ll share with you. Email me a receipt that shows you bought the book or a photo that shows you got it out of the library and I’ll send my notes so you get more value out of your reading.

Recent Interviews & Guest Articles: 

Shel’s done 16 podcasts recently, ranging from 5 minutes to a full hour. Click here to see descriptions and replay links.
Connect with Shel


 

Find on Facebook

 

 

 

 

 

About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of ten books…international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.
He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).
“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

The Clean and Green Club, November 2016

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
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Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, November 2016
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Donald Trump, Social Entrepreneurship, and YOU

I am finishing this newsletter less than 24 hours after Donald Trump was named the victor in the US presidential race. As someone who has spent my whole life defending the oppressed, combatting racism, sexism, ableism and other ingrained prejudice, and working to preserve our planet. I was disheartened to see a repudiation of everything I stand for.

But the work goes on. It will be harder under a Trump administration than it has been under Obama. We can expect rollbacks of the hard-fought climate protection agreement forged in Paris last year, as one example. I have actually written to Trump and made a business case for continuing to honor Paris. I’ll be making that public shortly and will link to it here next month—or you can watch for it on my Facebook feed.

One of my very few regrets in my life is not fighting harder against the 2000 election results (which, to me and many others, were deeply tainted). I will not make that mistake again. If you visit my Facebook profile and scroll back to November 9, you’ll see resources of organizations you can support. And you’ll see a press release called “How Can Social Entrepreneurs Still Thrive in a Trump America?”, also posted at http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/how-can-social-entrepreneurs-still-thrive-in-a-trump-america/

This Month’s Tip: How Long Do You Keep Marketing to “Dead” Prospects?

Conventional marketing wisdom tells you to keep purging your list, purging your list, purging your list. If they haven’t bought from you after so many months, out they go! Some businesses will even purge the ones who do buy, but haven’t bought “enough.” They chop out the clients who provide the bottom 10 or 20 percent of revenue each year, and concentrate on the bigger fish.

Here’s some UNconventional marketing wisdom: that’s a load of crap.

Consider this:

  • Some people take years to decide on a purchase
  • Purchases, especially of expensive products or services in the B2B (business-to-business) world, might require a very long sales cycle while you build trust
  • It’s not uncommon to move a sale through the “funnel” model, starting with a no-cost or very inexpensive information product, and moving through a series of products of increasing depth—building trust and a reputation as the expert—before finally landing the big sale.

Tonight, I was inspired to write this column because I listened to a webinar, and at the end of that webinar, I pulled out my credit card and bought an info product for $995. Maybe the most interesting thing about the purchase is where it came in my cycle of trust with the presenter and the organizer. I met the organizer in 1997 or 1998 and have consumed a lot of his no-cost offerings; I met the presenter online a couple of years later. I’d purchased very low-cost products from the organizer a few times (such as a one-day conference in the $59 range); I’d never bought anything from the presenter before this call, although I had listened to several of her previous webinars and actually had a no-cost consultation from her.

It’s very rare that I buy something priced higher than $100 or so through a webinar. But in this case,

  1. Buying this product will probably save me at least 20 hours of time—and (because it includes sample contracts and other documents) several hundred dollars in lawyer-review fees.
  2. The two principals had proven their value to me over time, by consistently providing great information.
  3. The presenter’s offer happened to coincide exactly with a new direction in my business.
  4. A risk-free 100% satisfaction promise made it a no-brainer. If it wasn’t what I expected, I could send it back.

The confluence of those four factors made it worth my while to drop a whole grand on this. Those conditions moved me from lookie-loo to buyer of a relatively expensive product. Those conditions hadn’t existed before.

As a service provider, I’ve also experienced this from the other side.

  • This summer, I had a $39,500 client and a $6,000 client. Both of those originally came to me several years ago, with a tiny little project that earned me a few hundred dollars. And both of them have dribbled a steady stream of small projects my way. The $6K client had done some larger projects with me, including one at $20K. If I remember correctly, the $40K client had not spent more than about $1,500 with me at once.
  • Two other clients I worked with this summer have consistently spent a few hundred dollars at a time, a few times a year, for several years.
  • My final big client this summer was a referral—from a client I worked with nine years ago!
  • I literally had a client contact me who had saved and filed an article in the Wall Street Journal about six years earlier that mentioned me.
  • Most of my largest projects in the 35 years I’ve run my business have grown out of previously completing a series of very small orders—pretty much everything except book contracts from publishers, and a few of my book-project-management gigs.

How much work would I have given up if I had purged these folks from my list because they hadn’t bought yet, or hadn’t bought enough yet?

How many people are you sending away just before they were finally ready to buy, or buy bigger?

Hear and Meet Shel
If you’re attending Suzanne Evans’ Build Your Speaking Biz conference in Atlanta, this Thursday, November 17 through Saturday, November 19, please introduce yourself. Better yet, send an email beforehand and we’ll try to meet up.

Thursday, December 1, 5 pm ET/2 pm PT, guest on Willie Crawford and Haddy Folivi’s entrepreneurial radio show.

Monday, December 5 is the likely release date for a really interesting and unusual interview with Jena Rodriguez on the Branding with Jena/Brave Entrepreneur podcast. This is the first time I think I’ve been asked about how I’ve been brave in my social change work (and I riffed about some of the people who are much braver than I am). We had a lot of fun, too.

Monday and Tuesday, March 28-29, I think I will be attending the Ethical Corporation conference in New York City, and moderating at least one session. Details not firmed up as of press time.

Order your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Find out more and order from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies directly from me). http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
 
Download a free sampler with several excerpts, the complete Table of Contents and Index, and all the endorsements.
Another Recommended BookTools for Grassroots Activists
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Tools for Grassroots Activists: Best Practices for Success in the Environmental Movement, Edited by Nora Gallagher and Lisa Myers

After two months in a row of reviewing corporate apologists, it’s refreshing to stumble on a grassroots handbook for action—published by a very different kind of corporation: Patagonia.

This is a book I wish I’d had access to in some of the organizing campaigns I’ve been involved with for the past 40 years. It’s full of diverse advice from activists in the trenches. Some of these are people we’ve heard of: Bill McKibben, author of several climate change classics and founder of 350.org…Jane Goodall, researcher and activist for chimpanzees…toxics activist Lois Gibbs (who took on Hooker Chemical over the contamination of Niagara Falls’ Love Canal neighborhood)…and of course, Patagonia’s amazing founder Yvon Chouinard, among others.

But most of them are known not so much by their names, but their deeds. They leave a trail of success. They have organized or actively participated in movements that saved threatened land. They have expertise in areas such as grassroots organizing, media relations, fundraising, lobbying…

Many of them have great advice about how to work with people who don’t share your values or lifestyles—engaging ranchers, ethnic or cultural communities, retailers, or commercial fishing operators in the areas where your purposes overlap, or winning over influential conservative politicians.

Reflecting on my own experience as the founding organizer of a group that successfully defeated a large development project on our local mountain in 1999-2000 and my participation in a few other successful movements, I found most of the advice was spot on.  Specifically: 

  • Look for common ground
  • Include business supporters and other stakeholders outside the environmental groups in victory celebrations
  • Stay focused on the big goals—don’t drown in minutiae
  • Be willing to negotiate a small reduction in your goals in order to vastly broaden your support base
  • Focus on stories instead of statistics.

Some provide cautionary tales about how NOT to do this work. For example, when John Sterling—now Executive Director of the Conservation Alliance—was Patagonia’s Director of Environmental Programs, he was pressured by an activist with a very short deadline to declare publicly in an ad that the company was not using products from old-growth forests. The activist gained the signatures of several other companies—but when logging interests declared a boycott on the listed firms, the activist hung them all out to dry. Needless to say, those executives who had gone out on a limb were a lot less receptive to future appeals from environmentalists; the activist had done more harm than good.

The book also introduced me to some new resources, or new ways of using familiar tools. I hadn’t been aware of Headwaters Economics, a think tank that researches the economic contributions of undeveloped natural resources and generally finds that they have contribute more to the economy than they do when they’re extracted. And it hadn’t occurred to me that Google Earth could be such a powerful tool to create visual aids such as time-lapse maps that track the melting of a glacier or the land-use impact of a rapidly developing city.

Surprisingly, the book doesn’t deeply address the issue of coalition partners getting caught up in fighting each other instead of focusing on the wider goal—but this is something I’ve experienced over and over again in progressive movements.

My favorite essay was Jane Goodall’s message of hope. She called for activists to celebrate the good news, and noted that there’s plenty of it. And her success story showed how a well-executed campaign could impact on multiple levels; her Roots and Shoots project manages to address habitat and species protection, youth empowerment, and bringing people out of poverty all at once. That’s just the kind of victory I love to celebrate in my books and talks.

Highly recommended.

Recent Interviews & Guest Articles: 

Shel’s done 13 podcasts recently, ranging from 5 minutes to a full hour. Click here to see descriptions and replay links.
Connect with Shel

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Connect on LinkedIn

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About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of ten books…international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.
He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).
“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
Privacy Policy: We Respect Your Privacy

We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.

The Clean and Green Club, October 2016

Having trouble reading this as e-mail? Please visit www.thecleanandgreenclub.com to read it comfortably online.
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Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Marketing Tip, October 2016
This Month’s Tip: Life-Work Balance? You Bet: How to Create More Hours in the Day
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I’m writing to you on the evening of October 4—just after the end of Rosh HaShana, the Jewish new year. Starting the previous month and going for several weeks until Simchat Torah a few weeks later (October 25, this year), Jews take time for reflection and renewal—peaking at Yom Kippur, which will have been a few days before you receive this. We spend a lot of time in synagogue or find other ways to get right with God and our fellow humans, apologize if necessary, reflect on the things we want to do better, and emanate positive energy about our directions in the year to come. We’ve been doing this a very long time; this year is 5777. We had more than a 1,000-year head start on the Chinese, who are in year 4013.

I personally don’t go to synagogue much. I did the Tashlich ritual twice of casting bread into moving water (traditionally, to represent the sins you want to get rid of—as I do it, the aspirations of what I’d like to do better): once with my kids, who came in for the holidays, and again with friends from our local Jewish community. I do plan to attend Kol Neidre services the evening before Yom Kippur (all Jewish days start the night before) and possibly some part of Yom Kippur itself.

And with all this reflection, I’m going to veer off my usual subjects of green and ethical business success, marketing, and book publishing—and talk a bit about WHY we work.

We work to live; we don’t live to work. Work provides the income that enable us to feed, house, and clothe our selves and our loved ones—and to experience some joys of a fulfilled life that are easier with money. We also work to create a better world, and for the satisfaction of doing something well. And of course, we each have other reasons.

I’ve talked a lot over the years about working—about my joy in using my writing, speaking, and consulting skills to make the world better. Today, I’m going to talk about the choices I’ve made to build in time NOT working—to keep my life in balance and build in time for things that matter.

Let’s start with exercise. My goal is to get 2 hours of it every day, with at least 1/3 outdoors. On non-travel days, I don’t go to bed until I’ve had at least one hour. And I track it—very simply. I write the number of minutes for the day on a paper calendar that I also use to track what books I’ve read, how many learning audios I’ve listened to, and of course, my appointments and to-do list. I find that tracking, even this informally, inspires me to do more. September, for instance, was a particularly good month. I got 3722 total minutes of exercise, or average of 124 minutes per day—above my goal despite two travel days. Three days I only managed between 94-110 minutes, and the 94 was one of my two travel days that month. The other 27 days, I got between 120 and 151 minutes each day.

Reading and learning are other things I make time for. In September, I read seven books (six of them at my exercise bike) and listened to 24 learning audios—more than usual, thanks to a really good telesummit.

Travel, arts, and time with friends and colleagues are also important to me. I got to New York once in September to attend a conference at the UN—and to visit my daughter and her husband. I had scheduled two trips to Boston, one to see my son perform a solo concert and once to meet a client. Both trips were to include visiting my son. But my wife got sick, so we watched his concert on a livestream, from home. Then my client canceled her trip east.

Even skipping my son’s performance, I made it to seven live cultural events last month: four concerts, one play, and two agricultural festivals. And yes, I watched the first presidential debate. I also attended two professional networking functions and scheduled two one-on-one meetings with new colleagues. Add to this an hour or two a day of online networking.

I travel quite a bit. While September had only the one overnight, in the past twelve months I’ve had three major trips of five to 20 days: to Texas, China, and eastern Canada—and at least a dozen shorter ones, to Boston, NYC, Vermont, and Rhode Island. In the next few weeks, I’m visiting family in Denver (and meeting a new business contact) and attending a conference in Atlanta. We’re going to Thailand in January.

Typically, I get about 6 hours of sleep most nights—getting up between 5:40 and 6:30 a.m. and heading to sleep between 11:30 and midnight. Most days, I squeeze in one or two very short naps (30 seconds to ten minutes). Cooking is fun for me, and I usually cook at least three dinners per week for my wife and myself (and, frequently, guests), as does she.

And of course, I spend several hours most weekdays either on direct client projects, admin, and/or on steering my business toward where I’d like it to be (following a shift in emphasis three years ago). But I don’t let the work subsume my reasons for living my life.

How about you? What do you do to regenerate yourself? What are your priorities outside of your work? How much time do you allocate per week to making yourself a better or more complete person? Use the comment field at the bottom to tell us. Maybe it will even lead to connecting with other readers.

Next month, I promise, we’ll be back to a direct focus on business. Next month’s lead article is called Marketing to “Dead” Prospects.

Hear and Meet Shel
Wed. 11/2, 1 pm ET/10 a.m. PT: “Impossible is a Dare: Leveraging Business to Heal the World,” webinar co-sponsored by Green America and Transformpreneur. http://events.transformpreneur.com/index.php/event-registration-5/ Green America is a great organization, and my charity partner for my last two book launches.

I’m taping postcast interviews with both Ajay Prasad on Founder’s Corner and Jena Rodriguez on the Brave Entrepreneur podcasts. See next issue for playback links.

Tues. 11/8, 6 pm ET: First meeting of Western Massachusetts Global Marketers. This is a new group of entrepreneurs who market nationally or internationally and are based in Western Massachusetts. By invitation only. If you think you should be invited, give me a call at 413-586-2388 (8 a.m. to 10 p.m. US Eastern) and tell me about yourself.

Tues. 11/8: If you’re a US citizen, please VOTE! If you want your vote to support the Paris accord and other action on catastrophic climate change—which for me is a very key issue—consider the Democratic Party position of strong support for reducing carbon output and gradually (too gradually) moving toward a clean, renewable economy vs. the Republican position of denial, hostility, and reversal of the small steps we’ve taken. And consider that even if the climate skeptics are right (and I see plenty of evidence in storms like Katrina, Rita, Irene, Sandy, and Matthew that they are very wrong)—we still get to lower our energy bills, increase our comfort, reduce dependence on foreign powers, and clean up our lungs. Reversing and retrogressing back to fossil and nuclear is stepping away from the future we all want.

Wed. 11/9 (telesummit starts 11/1—don’t wait for my call, this is great stuff): Nicole Holland interviews me on her Building Business Rockstars telesummit. Proud to say I’m in awesome company of rockstars including Marisa Murgatroyd, Dorie Clark, Lou Bortone, and several other very cool people. You’ll want to listen to the whole series. No charge to sign up: http://shelhorowitz.com/go/rockstars/ Plus, you get to see the incredible job Nicole did putting together the visually stunning, highly informative workbook (really a combination brochure and learning tool. Even if you hate listening to teleseminars, you should visit that URL and pick up your copy. A lot of learning there both in the content and in the presentation. The calls run November 1-10.

Wed. 11/16: If you are in Atlanta and want to get together in the late afternoon or evening, I will have some free time. Call me (phone number above) no later than November 10.

Thu.-Sat. 11/17-19: I’ll be attending Suzanne Evans’ and Larry Winget’s Build Your Speaking Biz event in Atlanta—and I have ONE ticket to give away. Visit http://buildyourspeakingbizbootcamp.com/ — and let me know right away if you want to go. First person to respond gets the link for a comp.

Friends/Colleagues who Want to Help
These days, we’re all bombarded with marketing messages–most of which are digital and lack a personal touch. 
 
By accurately replicating handwriting, Thankster gives marketers a unique advantage through personalized handwritten cards. The result? Happier customers and higher conversion rates. http://shelhorowitz.com/go/thankster/

Order your copy of Shel’s newest book, Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World

Learn how the business world can profit while solving hunger, poverty, war, and catastrophic climate change (hint: they’re all based in resource conflicts). Endorsed by Chicken Soup’s Jack Canfield, business blogger and bestselling author Seth Godin, and many others. Find out more and order from several major booksellers (or get autographed and inscribed copies directly from me). http://goingbeyondsustainability.com/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world/
 
Download a free sampler with several excerpts, the complete Table of Contents and Index, and all the endorsements.
Another Recommended BookThe Surprising Solution
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The Surprising Solution: Creating Possibility in a Swift and Severe World by Bruce Piasecki (Sourcebooks, 2009)

Here’s another insider’s approach: a book on deep sustainability by a consultant immersed in the world of multinational corporations. It’s well written, thoroughly researched, and in some ways, reader-friendly—with a good index and a long list of recommended books, websites, and other resources. And there’s a lot of substance. I took five full pages of notes.
Among his key points:
  • Sustainability, when done the right way, is good for business (which is now common wisdom.
  • The progress a business makes toward environmental AND economic sustainability is shaped like the letter S; it has upslopes and downslopes. Innovation puts a company on the upslope; things like ethics violations and environmental issues (as well as more 101 stuff like missing the right market) are among the forces pushing down. 
  • Businesses need to think and act for the long term; short-term thinking is short-sighted and forces us to keep on a path that destroys resources and hurts humans, instead of the “social response capitalism” (SRC) he favors. However, the culture, legal structures and governance of most corporations make this more difficult than it should be.
  • While government can play a crucial role, the deepest changes originate within a company (p. 230).
  • Consumers also have a role. When we recognize our power, companies had better pay attention.
  • We have many lessons to learn from the largest corporations; as these lessons trickle down, we’re better able to preserve the planet while making a good profit.
For Piasecki, SRC companies (pp. 43-44):
  1. Create superior, socially responsible “products that bridge the gap between traditional expectation of performance and price and social impactthat respond to legitimate, emerging social pressures and needs” such as eliminating toxics, replacing waste with reusability, etc. 
  2. Stop ignoring externalities and understand that social good builds “the long-term viability of entire product lines” 
Piasecki consistently reinforces the idea that doing the right thing is good for business (as I’ve “preached” for two decades). He cites several benefits for SRC corporations, including lower costs/higher margins, reducing the production cycle time, access to global markets, product differentiation, making products more valuable through their social impact, and reducing risk (pp. 55-56).

Much of his analysis is based on in-depth case studies of two of his client companies: Toyota and HP. Smaller case studies include the Gap clothing chain and the Canadian oil company Suncor (an example that I believe needs to be updated substantially).

I was particularly interested in the HP case study because of its emphasis on how one of the world’s largest companies is addressing Bottom-of-the-Pyramid economies with low-priced, dependable machines and business models adapted to markets with near-zero purchasing power pp. 152-177). (See my review about ten years ago of The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid (scroll down, and if you got here through my email newsletter, you’re already a subscriber)).

Near the end (p. 241), Piasecki poses three questions that every manufacturing company should examine:
  1. What is enough?
  2. How do we make superior, energy-efficient products?
  3. What’s the best way to revitalize manufacturing in this “smaller and more severe world?”
While I found the book quite useful and was glad to see it reinforces many of the principles in my own books including Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World, I found I could only digest a little at a time. After five or ten pages, I would stop. It took me about two months to make it all the way through.
In reading, I also needed to keep my date filtering antennae up. Most of the book (originally published in 2007) was written before the market collapse, although he revised for a 2009 edition. And all of it was before the new (and scary) technologies such as fracking sharply dropped the price of fossil fuels—with major consequences for some of his theories and models.
Recent Interviews & Guest Articles:

Five-minute interview on Jennings Wire: “How Ordinary People Can Do The Extraordinary” How ordinary people start and lead movements—and how Shel saved a mountain in his own town. http://www.jenningswire.com/authors/podcast-how-ordinary-people-can-do-the-extraordinary/

Mike Schwager: http://wsradio.com/051916-guerrilla-marketing-heal-world-shel-horowitz/
How I got started in social/environmental change at age 3 and returned to it (for life) at age 12. Dialog with Jack Nadel, 92-year-old entrepreneur with a green product line. The easiest ways a business can go green—and the real 7-figure savings that are possible when counting all the costs. Why market share doesn’t matter, and how to partner with competitors

Western Massachusetts Business Show with Ira Bryck, http://whmp.com/podcasts/western-mass-business-show-4-9-16/ Profiles of several companies that were founded to good in the world. Green companies as price leaders. How to get a copy of my $9.95 ebook, Painless Green: 111 Tips to Help the Environment, Lower Your Carbon Footprint, Cut Your Budget, and Improve Your Quality of Life—With No Negative Impact on Your Lifestyle at no cost.

Bill Newman: http://whmp.com/podcasts/the-101-best-dingers-in-baseball/ (segment starts at 28:28): A quick, intense 11-minute trip through the highlights of my work

Ask those Branding Guys: http://santafe.com/thevoice/podcasts/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world (segment starts at 9:23)

Barry Moltz: http://barrymoltz.com/2016/05/375-jay-baer-says-hug-haters-green-movement-continues-federal-contracting-opportunities-small-business/ (segment starts at 15:12)

Todd Schinck, Intrepid Now, with a nice emphasis on the power of ordinary people to change the world: http://intrepidnow.com/authors/shel-horowitz-combining-principles-profits-grow-business-heal-world/ (segment starts at 2:28)

JV Crum, Conscious Millionaire, second interview: We cover my first activist moment at age 3, how I helped save a mountain, the next big environmental issue, and how a simple vow in my 20s changed my life http://consciousmillionaire.com/shelhorowitz2/ (segment starts at 3:25)

Jill Buck, Go Green Radio: http://www.voiceamerica.com/episode/92012/guerrilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world (segment starts at 0:52). The difference between socially responsible and socially transformative businesses, impact of a social agenda on employees, urban farming, new energy technologies…and a cool case study of how a dog groomer could green up.

Kristie Notto, Be Legendary: The perfect example of a business that addresses social issues, the hidden revenue model I showed a social entrepreneur, how a famous gourmet food company went head-to-head with a much larger competitor, what we can learn about engineering from nature, and why wars are solvable http://traffic.libsyn.com/belegendarypodcast/Be_Legendary_Podcast_-_Shel_Horowitz_for_itunes.mp3

Guest on Leon Jay, Socialpreneurtv http://socialpreneur.tv/building-better-products/guerilla-marketing-to-heal-the-world (you’ll get to see what I look like when I’m overdue for a haircut/beard trim—a rare glimpse at Shaggy Shel)

Two-part interview on Steve Sapowksy’s excellent EcoWarrior Radio podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/pt.-1-guerrilla-marketing/id1080237490?i=363550688&mt=2/ (Listen to Part 1 before Part 2, of course)

The first of two excellent shows on Conscious Millionaire http://consciousmillionaire.com/shelhorowitz/

Connect with Shel


 

Find on Facebook

 

 

 

 

 

About Shel & This Newsletter

As a green and social change business profitability/marketing consultant and copywriter…award-winning author of ten books…international speaker and trainer, blogger, syndicated columnist – Shel Horowitz shows how green, ethical, and socially conscious businesses can actually be *more* profitable than your less-green, less-socially-aware competitors. His award-winning 8th book Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your Planet was a category bestseller for at least 34 months (and is now available exclusively through Shel). Shel also helps authors/ publishers, small businesses, and organizations to market effectively, and turns unpublished writers into well-published authors.

Shel Horowitz’s consulting firm, Green And Profitable, is the first business ever to earn Green America’s rigorous Gold Certification as a leading green company. He was inducted into the National Environmental Hall of Fame in 2011.
He began publishing his monthly newsletter all the way back in 1997, making it one of the oldest marketing e-zines (it’s changed names a few times along the way).
“As always, some of the links in this newsletter earn commissions—because I believe in the products and services enough to promote them (I get asked to endorse lots of other programs I don’t share with you, because I don’t find them worthy).”
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We collect your information solely to let our mailing service send you the information you request. We do not share it with any outside party not involved in mailing our information to you. Of course, you may unsubscribe at any time—but we hope you’ll stick around to keep up with cool developments at the intersections of sustainability, social transformation, and keeping the planet in balance. Each issue of Shel Horowitz’s Clean and Green Newsletter has a how-to or thought-leadership article and a review of a recommended book. We’ve been doing an e-newsletter all the way back to 1997, and some of our readers have been with us the whole time.